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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: The book, rumors, and legends

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  • Gergely
    Frank, I can t remember if I told you about this already. This November, I was at a political victory party in York County and overheard a guy in a
    Message 1 of 39 , Jan 27, 2008
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      Frank,
      I can't remember if I told you about this already. This November, I was at a political victory party in York County and overheard a guy in a conversation near me say what sounded like "Slovak". I asked him of that's what he said, and he replied that his wife had Slovak ancestry. I asked him her maiden name - Plichta. Remembering you went to Warwick High, I immediately said Galax, and yep, she's your kin. Can't remember now if he said sister or cousin.
      I have a couple of period books on immigrants written around the turn of the 20th Century. I remember they talked about the steamship companies advertising in Central Europe. I'll look to see if they talk any about the inverse.
      Jack Gergely
      Newport News

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Plichta
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2008 11:00 PM
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: The book, rumors, and legends


      Ron,

      Is there a way to find out if one of those advertisements for folks to
      return to Hungary was ever printed in a newspaper in Pittsburgh, PA?

      I know that my grandfather b. 1882 first arrived in the USA in 1899 at the
      age of 16. He married in PA about 1904 and returned to Slovakia with his
      American born wife of Slovak ancestry some time after that. I know he was
      in the Austro-Hungarian army as early as 1914, perhaps earlier, and that he
      was hospitalized on two occasions while in the A-H army in 1916 and 1917.
      He returned to America in June of 1920.

      Frank R. Plichta

      Galax, Virginia

      _____

      From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of LongJohn Wayne
      Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2008 10:28 PM
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Cc: Imperial Secretariat at Chiang Robert Saint-Ormonde
      Subject: [SPAM]Re: [Slovak-World] Re: The book, rumors, and legends

      Fascinating.

      Martin, you are an internet icon.

      --- Ron Matviyak <rmat@mtaonline. <mailto:rmat%40mtaonline.net> net> wrote:

      > Michelle,
      >
      > I believe if you read the book "Round Trip to
      > America" about European
      > (not just Slovak) immigrants who returned to the
      > homeland, then you
      > will also be told of Austria-Hungary advertising in
      > American papers
      > for Hungarian patriots to return and fight for the
      > homeland. This, of
      > course, was during the years America was neutral.
      > The book reports
      > that a fair number of people did return. Perhaps
      > they even comment on
      > the Slovak-Hungarians who returned to fight for the
      > king. Ah,
      > patriotism!
      >
      > Ron
      >
      > --- In Slovak-World@ <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
      yahoogroups.com, "Mader,
      > Michelle A. (GRC-CHC0)"
      > <Michelle.A.Mader@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Thank you so much, Martin! That 'legend' has been
      > around for such a
      > > long time and I always wondered.
      > >
      > > To what do you attribute the fact that a person
      > often wrote down
      > > different dates for their birth on different
      > documents? Could they have
      > > confused the birth date and the baptismal date?
      > Or the actual birth
      > > date and the date the birth was recorded? Or ??
      > >
      > > Michelle
      > > Michelle Maco Mader
      > > Cleveland, Ohio USA
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > >
      > > From: Slovak-World@ <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
      yahoogroups.com
      > > [mailto:Slovak-World@ <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
      yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      > Martin Votruba
      > > Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2008 4:29 PM
      > > To: Slovak-World@ <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
      yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: The book, rumors, and
      > legends
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > > Is it true that the King of Hungary had the
      > permission of the
      > > > US to take people back (non-citizens, I assume)
      > if they could
      > > > be found here?
      > >
      > > Absolutely not. The US state police weren't even
      > allowed to
      > > cross the
      > > state line, so it's quite absurd to imagine that
      > the Federal
      > > government would have allowed agents of a foreign
      > power (and a
      > > potential enemy) to operate in the US, catch, and
      > deport people.
      > >
      > > Quite the contrary, the Department of State
      > published
      > > information
      > > about the legal-military pitfalls a male person
      > from
      > > Austria-Hungary
      > > eligible for draft there might encounter upon
      > returning to their
      > > country of origin.
      > >
      > > There actually was almost an armed conflict
      > sometime in the
      > > 1850s in
      > > the Adriatic when an Austro-Hungarian ship
      > carried a legal
      > > citizen of
      > > Austria-Hungary (with a name that might have been
      > Slovak: Martin
      > > Koszta), but a resident of the US, captured in
      > Izmir, Turkey,
      > > and was
      > > taking him to Austria-Hungary. A US navy ship
      > threatened to fire
      > > its
      > > cannon at the A-H vessel unless the person was
      > released, which
      > > he
      > > ultimately was.
      > >
      > > Martin
      > >
      > > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
      > removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >

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    • bike_for_life2003
      Good point, Chuck.... I personally still find it hard to remember that Europe in the middle ages was much different than the Europe of today. In the 13th
      Message 39 of 39 , May 16, 2008
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        Good point, Chuck....

        I personally still find it hard to remember that Europe in the middle
        ages was much different than the Europe of today. In the 13th
        century, that part of Hungary which is present-day Slovakia could have
        been quite urbanized when compared to other parts of the country.

        Regarding references to Slovakia/Slovenia in Julie's readings, it's
        not surprising. Slavic settlement of what is modern-day Slovenia
        began in 550 and originated in Moravia so there is an historical link.
        More on Slovenia's history can be found here:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Slovenia

        I didn't study Slovenian prior to my short visit to Ljubljana in 1999.
        That said, having now studied Slovak for several years and looking at
        online Slovenian language courses, one can see quite a bit of
        similarity between the languages much as I saw with Croatian when
        visiting there a couple of years ago. I would say it's like the
        similarity between Spanish and Italian.

        Paul in NW Florida

        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, LongJohn Wayne
        <daxthewarrior@...> wrote:
        >
        > Julie:
        >
        > Fantastic observations.
        >
        > And I didn't even read the book. Thannks,
        > Slovak-World. You have become my modern day Cliff
        > Notes.
        >
        > I learn from you.
        >
        > Chuck
        >
        > --- J Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
        >
        > > It's been a busy week, and I'm only now getting
        > > around to posting
        > > about Spiesz's book. I just have a couple of quick
        > > things to say,
        > > before I call it a night.
        > >
        > > I enjoyed the afterword, having a nice summary after
        > > reading the book
        > > over such a long stretch of time.
        > >
        > > Question: Why on pp. 274-275 do we suddenly get
        > > several references
        > > to "Slovenes/Slovaks"?
        > >
        > > Unexpected: p. 276: "The territory that is
        > > Slovakia today was the
        > > most urbanized part of the Hungarian Kingdom <in the
        > > 13th century>".
        > > I don't know which is worse, my ignorance of
        > > Slovakia or my ignorance
        > > of Hungary! I think of Slovakia as being (past and
        > > present) rather
        > > rural... in spite of the fact that the country is
        > > dotted with larger
        > > towns with beautiful old squares (= commerce & money
        > > in past
        > > centuries, right?) where I like to have lunch at a
        > > sidewalk table on
        > > a sunny summer day. Am I the only one with this
        > > misperception? Is
        > > it because most of us think of our impoverished
        > > peasant ancestors in
        > > villages, and we forget that there really was
        > > commerce and trade and
        > > prosperity as well? I mean, I *know* about the
        > > towns and cities, but
        > > keep forgetting about how many there were
        > > historically, and what was
        > > happening there...my mental historical picture must
        > > depend too much
        > > on where I see my ancestors. And I hadn't really
        > > thought much about
        > > how Hungary (the modern geographic area) might
        > > compare to Slovakia
        > > (aka Upper Hungary) back then. Interesting.
        > >
        > > OK, that's it from me tonight.
        > >
        > > Julie Michutka
        > > jmm@...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
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