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Re: [Slovak-World] The case of the disappearing Slovak-Americans - a P.S.

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  • Helen Fedor
    But we re talking about a drastic change in only a timespan of 10 years and over the entire U.S. H ... But I m inclined to think that the Czech/Slovak thing
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 25, 2007
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      But we're talking about a drastic change in only a timespan of 10 years and over the entire U.S.

      H


      >>> "Regina Haring" <rmharing@...> 10/24/2007 6:25 PM >>>
      "But I'm inclined to think that the Czech/Slovak thing paid a large part. There isn't that much consciousness of Slovak heritage in this area because * there aren't that many Slovaks today *, though there is usually a celebration after church in February (for Sts. Cyril and Methodius) where you will find some stuffed cabbage and hauski, but may also find lasagna!"

      Realized that it sounded like I'm agreeing that "there aren't that many Slovaks today".

      But I think that many have moved away from this suburban NYC county - and then too the population has so increased with diverse nationalities that a Slovak presence, which may have been noticeable 100 years ago, is no longer apparent.

      Regina Rabatin Haring

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Helen Fedor
      Greg, I looked on the table that David (the person inquiring) sent me with the figures and there s no listing for the Rusyns, but then again, the table is
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 25, 2007
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        Greg,
        I looked on the table that David (the person inquiring) sent me with the figures and there's no listing for the Rusyns, but then again, the table is labelled "Ancestries With 100,000 or More People in 2000: 1990 and 2000". Forgive my ignorance, but roughly how many Rusyns are there? Should they have been on this table?

        Even if some of the Slovaks moved to the Rusyn catagory, that still doesn't explain a 58% drop in 10 years. The Czechs dropped by 3% and "Czechoslovakians" increased by 40%. I wonder what accounts for that increase? Slovaks changing categories? And if so, why?

        H



        >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@...> 10/24/2007 6:42 PM >>>
        Would someone check the numbers on Carpatho-Rusyns for the
        same two census dates.

        If memory serves me correctly, Rusyn was added as a choice
        and several Carpatho-Rusyn organizations sent out mailings
        telling their members to use that choice.

        If the number of Rusyns didn't drop to the same degree, this
        may be where some of the Slovaks went.

        Greg Kopchak

        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Regina Haring" <rmharing@...> wrote:
        >
        > "But I'm inclined to think that the Czech/Slovak thing paid a large
        part. There isn't that much consciousness of Slovak heritage in this
        area because * there aren't that many Slovaks today *, though there is
        usually a celebration after church in February (for Sts. Cyril and
        Methodius) where you will find some stuffed cabbage and hauski, but
        may also find lasagna!"
        >
        > Realized that it sounded like I'm agreeing that "there aren't that
        many Slovaks today".
        >
        > But I think that many have moved away from this suburban NYC county
        - and then too the population has so increased with diverse
        nationalities that a Slovak presence, which may have been noticeable
        100 years ago, is no longer apparent.
      • vchromoho
        ... with the figures and there s no listing for the Rusyns, but then again, the table is labelled Ancestries With 100,000 or More People in 2000: 1990 and
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 25, 2007
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          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@...> wrote:
          >
          > Greg,
          > I looked on the table that David (the person inquiring) sent me
          with the figures and there's no listing for the Rusyns, but then
          again, the table is labelled "Ancestries With 100,000 or More People
          in 2000: 1990 and 2000". Forgive my ignorance, but roughly how many
          Rusyns are there? Should they have been on this table?
          >
          > Even if some of the Slovaks moved to the Rusyn catagory, that still
          doesn't explain a 58% drop in 10 years. The Czechs dropped by 3%
          and "Czechoslovakians" increased by 40%. I wonder what accounts for
          that increase? Slovaks changing categories? And if so, why?
          >
          > H

          Certainly you are right, Helen -- I assure you, any movement
          from "Slovak" to "Rusyn" would not account for any noticeable change
          in the # of Slovaks. AFAIK there have never been counted more than
          ~10,000 Rusyns in the U.S. census in the last two censuses. Part of
          the problem is with nomenclature and aggregation of responses. For
          Rusyns there was a change from the 1980 to the 1990 (and I think
          again to the 2000) census with respect to categorizing Rusyns and
          other ethnic groups. For starters, see Paul Robert Magocsi, _Are the
          Armenians Really Russians?--Or How the U.S. Census Bureau Classifies
          America's Ethnic Groups_ (1985), available for purchase here:
          http://www.rusynmedia.org/Links/C-RRC/C-RRC-Pubslist.pdf
          (I can't seem to find fulltext online, so check your library or order
          it if you're interested.)

          Counted as Rusyns were not only those who wrote "Carpatho-Rusyn"
          or "Rusyn" (or "Rusin"), but Ruthenian, Carpathian, and a few others.
          Although unfortunately those who said their ancestry was "Lemko" are
          aggregated with the category of Ukrainian. (I would say from a
          sociological point of view that is not an accurate assessment of the
          greater identity of those who would indicate their ancestry as Lemko!)
        • Dorothy L Fitts
          Hello Regina, I grew up in Spring Valley in Rockland County, NY. My paternal grandparents were from what at the time was Czechoslovakia. All of the brothers
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 2, 2007
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            Hello Regina,
            I grew up in Spring Valley in Rockland County, NY. My paternal grandparents
            were from what at the time was Czechoslovakia. All of the brothers came to
            the USA. They even ended up Americanizing the name as people had a hard time
            pronouncing and writing it. (We found three different phonetic type
            spellings in the census records.) They wanted to become Americans. They
            still kept to many of the traditions that they knew in the "Old Country".
            Many of my friends and the neighbors came from the area that I later found
            to be Slovakia. The shifting borders in Europe also made it difficult to
            tell your children exactly where your family came from. As an example, my
            paternal grandmother came from Szurte and when she was born it was in the
            northern part of Ung Megye in the Austria-Hungarian Empire. Then it was part
            of Czechoslovakia when she entered the USA, but now it is in Ukraine. Even
            the name of the town has changed spelling somewhat.

            People moved out from NY City and the population changed. The young people
            intermarried and moved from the area. As people moved from the closer in NY
            City suburbs, Rockland County became a new suburb. Real estate prices rose
            as the population grew. The older people moved to less expensive places. So
            did the young that were starting out with their families.

            Dorothy Jasenzak Fitts

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On
            Behalf Of Regina Haring
            Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2007 6:26 PM
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Slovak-World] The case of the disappearing Slovak-Americans - a
            P.S.


            "But I'm inclined to think that the Czech/Slovak thing paid a large part.
            There isn't that much consciousness of Slovak heritage in this area because
            * there aren't that many Slovaks today *, though there is usually a
            celebration after church in February (for Sts. Cyril and Methodius) where
            you will find some stuffed cabbage and hauski, but may also find lasagna!"

            Realized that it sounded like I'm agreeing that "there aren't that many
            Slovaks today".

            But I think that many have moved away from this suburban NYC county - and
            then too the population has so increased with diverse nationalities that a
            Slovak presence, which may have been noticeable 100 years ago, is no longer
            apparent.

            Regina Rabatin Haring

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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