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Re: [Slovak-World] Mushrooms

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  • helene cincebeaux
    Hi - really enjoyed reading this - i have been told that the splash of vinegar helps release the good stuff in the marrow of the bones. My great grandfather
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 2, 2007
      Hi - really enjoyed reading this - i have been told
      that the splash of vinegar helps release the good
      stuff in the marrow of the bones.

      My great grandfather made a great garlic soup I have
      been told - he mashed up cloves of garlic and added
      water and goose grease - maybe the modern version
      would be olive oil.I keep meaning to try it - one of
      these days.

      helene

      --- "Dr. Joe Q" <doctor_jq@...> wrote:

      > I remember my Baba always had a pot on the stove
      > with
      > "stuff" in it. It was all of the vegetable
      > clippings
      > and every now and then there was some meat. The
      > meat
      > was usually chicken (she had a chicken coop outside
      > of
      > the house) but sometimes it was pork; I don’t
      > remember
      > beef in the soup . The pot cooked all day and at
      > supper time, everyone got a bowl of what ever it was
      > that was cooked that day. My grandfather always put
      > a
      > splash of vinegar in his soup ( I don’t know why,
      > but
      > he would add the vinegar every time).
      >
      > The pot of soup on the stoves is the same thing we
      > saw
      > when we visited my cousins in Bardejov. There was a
      > pot on the stove all the time . . . and we were
      > served
      > the soup at lunch and supper (we never used the
      > confusing term - dinner; it was; breakfast, lunch,
      > supper).
      >
      > My Baba also made "shmear case", I think everyone on
      > this list knows the German name for cottage cheese.
      > My grandmother was Rusyn (Reuthenian), the Slovak
      > she
      > spoke was 100 years old and those are the words I
      > remember.
      >
      > I send this because at this time I am cooking a pot
      > of
      > vegetables and chicken parts (mostly wing tips) to
      > make a soup base. I will freeze the chicken stock
      > in
      > ice cube trays and we will use it in place of water
      > etc. when cooking. This is not a particularly
      > interesting or spectacular bit of information but it
      > is something we have done over the years.
      >
      > We keep the cut off parts of mushrooms (don't mess
      > with wild mushrooms unless you really know what you
      > doing), carrots peelings, celery ends, and not used
      > parts of onions in a bag in the freezer. After a
      > few
      > weeks, the whole thing is boiled to a broth in water
      > and frozen. (You already heard about the ice cube
      > tray).
      >
      > Dr. "Q"
      >
      > --- David <humblebe@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Hi: I picked mushrooms since I was a small kid.
      > Yes,
      > > we picked the
      > > type you are talking about. We called them
      > > red-toppers. When you cut
      > > the stems, they did turn blue/black and when you
      > > boiled them they
      > > were very dark and got kind of mushy, not like the
      > > stumpers and rams
      > > heads. There are look alikes that are bad, but
      > once
      > > you knew which
      > > was which, there never was much of a problem
      > telling
      > > them apart. On
      > > my property I pick up to 70 ramshead mushroom a
      > > year, depending on
      > > rain and cold nights. In fact the season for them
      > is
      > > fast
      > > approaching. Yes, I give them all away.
      > > Dave Kuchta
      > > At 05:40 PM 9/1/2007, you wrote:
      > >
      > > >I have a question for those of you who pick
      > > mushrooms.
      > > >
      > > >Our family has always picked and eaten the types
      > of
      > > boletus
      > > >mushrooms that immediately turn blue when you cut
      > > them (I think
      > > >these are boletus luridus, you can Google some
      > > pictures of that
      > > >at
      > >
      > <http://images.google.com>http://images.google.com).
      > > But in doing
      > > >some online research
      > > >I see sites that say they're poisonous, sites
      > that
      > > say they're
      > > >edible, and sites that say there are several
      > > closely-related
      > > >species that are hard to tell apart and since
      > some
      > > are edible and
      > > >some not it's best not to eat any blue-staining
      > > mushrooms.
      > > >
      > > >So I'm wondering what others of you were taught
      > by
      > > your families.
      > > >Do you pick and eat those, or were you taught to
      > > avoid them? I
      > > >was taught that they were good, and we've always
      > > eaten them and
      > > >have never had a problem.
      > > >
      > > >Joe
      >
      >
      >
      >
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