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Re: [Slovak-World] Mushrooms

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  • Dr. Joe Q
    I remember my Baba always had a pot on the stove with stuff in it. It was all of the vegetable clippings and every now and then there was some meat. The
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 1, 2007
      I remember my Baba always had a pot on the stove with
      "stuff" in it. It was all of the vegetable clippings
      and every now and then there was some meat. The meat
      was usually chicken (she had a chicken coop outside of
      the house) but sometimes it was pork; I don’t remember
      beef in the soup . The pot cooked all day and at
      supper time, everyone got a bowl of what ever it was
      that was cooked that day. My grandfather always put a
      splash of vinegar in his soup ( I don’t know why, but
      he would add the vinegar every time).

      The pot of soup on the stoves is the same thing we saw
      when we visited my cousins in Bardejov. There was a
      pot on the stove all the time . . . and we were served
      the soup at lunch and supper (we never used the
      confusing term - dinner; it was; breakfast, lunch,
      supper).

      My Baba also made "shmear case", I think everyone on
      this list knows the German name for cottage cheese.
      My grandmother was Rusyn (Reuthenian), the Slovak she
      spoke was 100 years old and those are the words I
      remember.

      I send this because at this time I am cooking a pot of
      vegetables and chicken parts (mostly wing tips) to
      make a soup base. I will freeze the chicken stock in
      ice cube trays and we will use it in place of water
      etc. when cooking. This is not a particularly
      interesting or spectacular bit of information but it
      is something we have done over the years.

      We keep the cut off parts of mushrooms (don't mess
      with wild mushrooms unless you really know what you
      doing), carrots peelings, celery ends, and not used
      parts of onions in a bag in the freezer. After a few
      weeks, the whole thing is boiled to a broth in water
      and frozen. (You already heard about the ice cube
      tray).

      Dr. "Q"

      --- David <humblebe@...> wrote:

      > Hi: I picked mushrooms since I was a small kid. Yes,
      > we picked the
      > type you are talking about. We called them
      > red-toppers. When you cut
      > the stems, they did turn blue/black and when you
      > boiled them they
      > were very dark and got kind of mushy, not like the
      > stumpers and rams
      > heads. There are look alikes that are bad, but once
      > you knew which
      > was which, there never was much of a problem telling
      > them apart. On
      > my property I pick up to 70 ramshead mushroom a
      > year, depending on
      > rain and cold nights. In fact the season for them is
      > fast
      > approaching. Yes, I give them all away.
      > Dave Kuchta
      > At 05:40 PM 9/1/2007, you wrote:
      >
      > >I have a question for those of you who pick
      > mushrooms.
      > >
      > >Our family has always picked and eaten the types of
      > boletus
      > >mushrooms that immediately turn blue when you cut
      > them (I think
      > >these are boletus luridus, you can Google some
      > pictures of that
      > >at
      > <http://images.google.com>http://images.google.com).
      > But in doing
      > >some online research
      > >I see sites that say they're poisonous, sites that
      > say they're
      > >edible, and sites that say there are several
      > closely-related
      > >species that are hard to tell apart and since some
      > are edible and
      > >some not it's best not to eat any blue-staining
      > mushrooms.
      > >
      > >So I'm wondering what others of you were taught by
      > your families.
      > >Do you pick and eat those, or were you taught to
      > avoid them? I
      > >was taught that they were good, and we've always
      > eaten them and
      > >have never had a problem.
      > >
      > >Joe



      ____________________________________________________________________________________
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    • helene cincebeaux
      Hi - really enjoyed reading this - i have been told that the splash of vinegar helps release the good stuff in the marrow of the bones. My great grandfather
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 2, 2007
        Hi - really enjoyed reading this - i have been told
        that the splash of vinegar helps release the good
        stuff in the marrow of the bones.

        My great grandfather made a great garlic soup I have
        been told - he mashed up cloves of garlic and added
        water and goose grease - maybe the modern version
        would be olive oil.I keep meaning to try it - one of
        these days.

        helene

        --- "Dr. Joe Q" <doctor_jq@...> wrote:

        > I remember my Baba always had a pot on the stove
        > with
        > "stuff" in it. It was all of the vegetable
        > clippings
        > and every now and then there was some meat. The
        > meat
        > was usually chicken (she had a chicken coop outside
        > of
        > the house) but sometimes it was pork; I don’t
        > remember
        > beef in the soup . The pot cooked all day and at
        > supper time, everyone got a bowl of what ever it was
        > that was cooked that day. My grandfather always put
        > a
        > splash of vinegar in his soup ( I don’t know why,
        > but
        > he would add the vinegar every time).
        >
        > The pot of soup on the stoves is the same thing we
        > saw
        > when we visited my cousins in Bardejov. There was a
        > pot on the stove all the time . . . and we were
        > served
        > the soup at lunch and supper (we never used the
        > confusing term - dinner; it was; breakfast, lunch,
        > supper).
        >
        > My Baba also made "shmear case", I think everyone on
        > this list knows the German name for cottage cheese.
        > My grandmother was Rusyn (Reuthenian), the Slovak
        > she
        > spoke was 100 years old and those are the words I
        > remember.
        >
        > I send this because at this time I am cooking a pot
        > of
        > vegetables and chicken parts (mostly wing tips) to
        > make a soup base. I will freeze the chicken stock
        > in
        > ice cube trays and we will use it in place of water
        > etc. when cooking. This is not a particularly
        > interesting or spectacular bit of information but it
        > is something we have done over the years.
        >
        > We keep the cut off parts of mushrooms (don't mess
        > with wild mushrooms unless you really know what you
        > doing), carrots peelings, celery ends, and not used
        > parts of onions in a bag in the freezer. After a
        > few
        > weeks, the whole thing is boiled to a broth in water
        > and frozen. (You already heard about the ice cube
        > tray).
        >
        > Dr. "Q"
        >
        > --- David <humblebe@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Hi: I picked mushrooms since I was a small kid.
        > Yes,
        > > we picked the
        > > type you are talking about. We called them
        > > red-toppers. When you cut
        > > the stems, they did turn blue/black and when you
        > > boiled them they
        > > were very dark and got kind of mushy, not like the
        > > stumpers and rams
        > > heads. There are look alikes that are bad, but
        > once
        > > you knew which
        > > was which, there never was much of a problem
        > telling
        > > them apart. On
        > > my property I pick up to 70 ramshead mushroom a
        > > year, depending on
        > > rain and cold nights. In fact the season for them
        > is
        > > fast
        > > approaching. Yes, I give them all away.
        > > Dave Kuchta
        > > At 05:40 PM 9/1/2007, you wrote:
        > >
        > > >I have a question for those of you who pick
        > > mushrooms.
        > > >
        > > >Our family has always picked and eaten the types
        > of
        > > boletus
        > > >mushrooms that immediately turn blue when you cut
        > > them (I think
        > > >these are boletus luridus, you can Google some
        > > pictures of that
        > > >at
        > >
        > <http://images.google.com>http://images.google.com).
        > > But in doing
        > > >some online research
        > > >I see sites that say they're poisonous, sites
        > that
        > > say they're
        > > >edible, and sites that say there are several
        > > closely-related
        > > >species that are hard to tell apart and since
        > some
        > > are edible and
        > > >some not it's best not to eat any blue-staining
        > > mushrooms.
        > > >
        > > >So I'm wondering what others of you were taught
        > by
        > > your families.
        > > >Do you pick and eat those, or were you taught to
        > > avoid them? I
        > > >was taught that they were good, and we've always
        > > eaten them and
        > > >have never had a problem.
        > > >
        > > >Joe
        >
        >
        >
        >
        ____________________________________________________________________________________
        > Moody friends. Drama queens. Your life? Nope! -
        > their life, your story. Play Sims Stories at Yahoo!
        > Games.
        > http://sims.yahoo.com/
        >




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