Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Fw:Reply to [Slovak-World] word for "father"

Expand Messages
  • gardnerlyn
    Greetings! This is my first post-reply in this wonderful group of people. I have been a member for sometime, just listening to people talk about my ancesterial
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings! This is my first post-reply in this wonderful group of
      people. I have been a member for sometime, just listening to people
      talk about my ancesterial homeland. I am a second generation
      American. My Grandmother came over with her five year old sister.
      Just the two of them, my Grandmother was 13. I was never allowed to
      speak Slovak, Grandma would always say "You speak American!!!"
      My Dad always called my Grandfather Njan'o. I was nice to finally see
      the word in print. I have learned a lot from this group and I thank
      you. I have a silver needle holder that says Uniontown Pa. on it and
      now I have a connection. Happy Feast Day to you. Linda (Zekany)Zelms


      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > > There is a Rusyn term equivalent to "Dad", which is
      > >
      > > njan'o (phon: NYUN-yoh)
      > >
      > > and its diminutive ("Daddy"),
      > >
      > > njan'ko
      > >
      > > If this is the term you used, maybe you are Rusyn. I've never
      heard
      > > of this word in any dialect of Slovak.
      >
      > Just came across this looking for something else. It's not as
      common
      > today, but it does occur in older Slovak literature and even in the
      > grade school primer (probably copied over and over again from who
      > knows when). I don't know about all the dialects, but I'd assume
      that
      > it cannot have disappeared completely. It is sometimes used as a
      > man's nickname among the Slovaks.
      >
      > In a broader picture, it's ancient Indo-European (if not older), not
      > even merely Slavic; one of those (now often children's) words
      created
      > by repeating the same syllable, the second one of which was often
      > subsequently modified (English: mummy, daddy, baby, yum-yum, the
      words
      > for "defecate/feces," British: geegee). _n~an~a_ is historically
      > related to the English _nanny_. I wouldn't be surprised if versions
      > of _n~an~a_ could be found, at least regionally, in many if not all
      > the Slavic languages, and in many others in Europe.
      >
      >
      > Martin
      >
      > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
      >
    • LongJohn Wayne
      Welcome to the club, Linda! ... ____________________________________________________________________________________ Need a vacation? Get great deals to
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 18, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Welcome to the club, Linda!

        --- gardnerlyn <JZELMS@...> wrote:

        > Greetings! This is my first post-reply in this
        > wonderful group of
        > people. I have been a member for sometime, just
        > listening to people
        > talk about my ancesterial homeland. I am a second
        > generation
        > American. My Grandmother came over with her five
        > year old sister.
        > Just the two of them, my Grandmother was 13. I was
        > never allowed to
        > speak Slovak, Grandma would always say "You speak
        > American!!!"
        > My Dad always called my Grandfather Njan'o. I was
        > nice to finally see
        > the word in print. I have learned a lot from this
        > group and I thank
        > you. I have a silver needle holder that says
        > Uniontown Pa. on it and
        > now I have a connection. Happy Feast Day to you.
        > Linda (Zekany)Zelms
        >
        >
        > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin
        > Votruba" <votrubam@...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > > There is a Rusyn term equivalent to "Dad", which
        > is
        > > >
        > > > njan'o (phon: NYUN-yoh)
        > > >
        > > > and its diminutive ("Daddy"),
        > > >
        > > > njan'ko
        > > >
        > > > If this is the term you used, maybe you are
        > Rusyn. I've never
        > heard
        > > > of this word in any dialect of Slovak.
        > >
        > > Just came across this looking for something else.
        > It's not as
        > common
        > > today, but it does occur in older Slovak
        > literature and even in the
        > > grade school primer (probably copied over and over
        > again from who
        > > knows when). I don't know about all the dialects,
        > but I'd assume
        > that
        > > it cannot have disappeared completely. It is
        > sometimes used as a
        > > man's nickname among the Slovaks.
        > >
        > > In a broader picture, it's ancient Indo-European
        > (if not older), not
        > > even merely Slavic; one of those (now often
        > children's) words
        > created
        > > by repeating the same syllable, the second one of
        > which was often
        > > subsequently modified (English: mummy, daddy,
        > baby, yum-yum, the
        > words
        > > for "defecate/feces," British: geegee). _n~an~a_
        > is historically
        > > related to the English _nanny_. I wouldn't be
        > surprised if versions
        > > of _n~an~a_ could be found, at least regionally,
        > in many if not all
        > > the Slavic languages, and in many others in
        > Europe.
        > >
        > >
        > > Martin
        > >
        > > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
        > >
        >
        >
        >




        ____________________________________________________________________________________
        Need a vacation? Get great deals
        to amazing places on Yahoo! Travel.
        http://travel.yahoo.com/
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.