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  • Victoria Hospodar Valentine
    Of course, it would have been nice to include the link! http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,134851-page,11-c,cellphones/article.html
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 3, 2007
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      Of course, it would have been nice to include the link!

      http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,134851-page,11-c,cellphones/article.html
    • amiak27
      Interesting link on cell phones, Victoria. For all of the high tech and the three and four band cell phones offered out there, my needs are quite simple and
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 3, 2007
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        Interesting link on cell phones, Victoria. For all of the high tech
        and the three and four band cell phones offered out there, my needs
        are quite simple and I took another alternative.

        I use a cell phone for calling people and the only gizmo I might add
        sometime is a camera phone so I can carry one phone/camera instead of
        two separate items. My plans are to visit Europe twice a year, and
        last Christmas I started in Germany, where I bought a European cell
        phone with a SIM card (SIM card is nothing more than a changeable
        computer chip, similar to a memory card in a camera). Total cost: 30
        Euros, including a SIM card with 35 Euros prepaid calling time.

        It is simple, as well as easy to keep track of the costs and recharge
        / buy a new SIM card at the local gas station when my pre-paid time
        runs down. For anyone spending most of your time in Slovakia or
        another country, I suggest buying the phone locally. I was lucky and
        found a good sale I cuold not afford to pass up.

        However, people should read the article you posted and make their own
        decision based upon their plans.
        Ron


        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Victoria Hospodar Valentine"
        <vvalentine4@...> wrote:
        >
        > Of course, it would have been nice to include the link!
        >
        >
        http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,134851-page,11-c,cellphones/article.html
        >
      • Paul Guzowski
        My two hallers worth on the subject. Up front, I will tell you that I don t work in the telecommunications industry and have no vested interested in any
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 9, 2007
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          My two hallers' worth on the subject. Up front, I will tell you that I
          don't work in the telecommunications industry and have no vested
          interested in any mobile phone provider. I reference T-Mobile below
          because that happens to be the easiest example since that's what I am
          using.

          I've been living and working in Central/Eastern Europe for six years now
          and have had a pre-pay mobile phone the entire time. Until recently
          these were cheaper phones that would only work in Europe. Now I have
          one that works easily on both continents by only changing a SIM card
          which takes less than five minutes.

          If you want to be will be getting a new phone in the US and want to use
          it overseas as well, make sure you get a tri-band or quad-band GSM
          phone. Even if you get the phone from a provider, you can still get one
          of these which will allow changing of subscriber identification modules
          (SIM). In this way you can have a phone that works in the US and Europe
          and all you need to do is change the SIM.

          My wife had been wanting a new phone anyway and we were considering
          changing providers for her US service and we settled on a program from
          T-Mobile. She got a Motorola Razr V3 phone for nothing (after rebate)
          when she signed a one-year contract. The phone is locked to T-Mobile
          and came with a US T-Mobile SIM. When she came to Slovakia last summer I
          bought her a T-Mobile Easy-Card (pre-pay) SIM here and it worked fine.
          If she had wanted to use another provider here, she could get an unlock
          code from T-Mobile USA for the phone once she had it 90 days.

          I also bought a Motorola Razr V3 in the US last year but mine was not
          locked to a particular provider so it cost quite a bit more. In any
          case it works fine with any provider here and I also have a T-Mobile
          pre-pay SIM for the US when I go home. The only trick is that the
          pre-pay minutes expire after a shorter time in the US and you can even
          lose the number if you don't add minutes often enough.
        • nhasior@aol.com
          Hello Paul and everyone, My children have been after me to get a cell phone for years. I am almost to that point. However, I would like to know if there is
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 10, 2007
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            Hello Paul and everyone,
            My children have been after me to get a cell phone for years. I am almost
            to that point. However, I would like to know if there is a cell phone that
            one can use to call the United States from Slovakia. Is there any particular
            phone company that provides this distance communication?
            thank you for any help.
            Noreen



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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Paul Guzowski
            Hello Noreen and group, Virtually any mobile phone that will work in Slovakia can be used to call internationally (including the US) as well as make local
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 12, 2007
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              Hello Noreen and group,
              Virtually any mobile phone that will work in Slovakia can be used to
              call internationally (including the US) as well as make local calls in
              Slovakia. That said, prices can vary widely and none of them is what
              most of us would call cheap. How you intend to use the phone while here
              and how much calling you wish to do to the US will affect which option
              you may want to chose.
              Firstly, as I mentioned in the original post, if you want to have one
              phone that will work both in the US and Europe, it needs to be a GSM
              tri-band or quad-band phone since mobile phone networks in the US and
              Europe operate on different frequencies.
              Secondly, the question is just how will you use the phone in Slovakia.
              If you will only come from the US infrequently for shortish stays and
              only use the phone for emergency purposes and perhaps a couple of short
              phone calls to the US, you could probably get by with a US phone program
              which can have international roaming activated when you will travel
              overseas. This would be perhaps the simplest solution and you would
              always have the same phone number although it could be the most
              expensive, especially since making local calls in Slovakia would be
              charged at the international roaming rate.
              If you will be traveling more frequently to Slovakia and will want to
              use the phone for more than just emergency contact and maybe a very few
              calls (either to US or local), you may want to get a pre-pay program
              here in Slovakia. There are only three mobile phone providers here and
              they all have international roaming so if you went to Austria or the
              Czech Republic you could still call. If you want to find out more
              information about the various provider programs here you can read about
              them at their websites at the following links (Unfortunately I could
              only find O2's in Slovak):

              http://www.t-mobile.sk/en/!pages.get?id=329902
              http://www.orange.sk/en_private/default.dwp
              http://www.sk.o2.com/sk/domovska-stranka.html


              With this type of system you only pay for what you use and it's easy
              to find out how much you have left. I can't speak for the other
              providers but with T-Mobile pre-pay here a phone call to the US costs
              about $1.50 per minute and local calls within Slovakia are just a few
              cents per minute. So it is probably quite a bit cheaper than roaming to
              Europe with your US plan. The possible downside is that you will have a
              different telephone number here and you have to change the SIM when you
              travel back and forth from US to Europe and back.
              You can get this type of system either by bringing a tri-band or
              quad-band GSM phone with you and just buying the Subsriber Identity
              Module (SIM) here and putting it into your phone or you can get a
              relatively inexpensive phone here complete with a SIM chip. If you buy
              a cheap phone here, it will most likely not work in the US so if you are
              contemplating getting your first mobile phone in the US, I would just
              make sure it is GSM tri-band or quad-band capable and you will be set.
              Now, given all the above, by far the cheapest way to call the US from
              here is via Voice over Internet Provider (VOIP). You can call from an
              internet café here if the computers are configured with microphones
              and/or headsets (and many of them are) using Skype or Yahoo Messenger.
              If the recipient of your call has the same software installed on his/her
              computer, the call is free and the only charge you would pay would be
              the internet café's charge to use the computer. If you will not be
              calling another computer, you must set up a prepaid account with Skype
              or Yahoo Messenger and when you call your account will be debited a
              couple of cents per minute for the call since you are only paying for
              the local call in the country where the recipient of the call resides.
              I use Skype and can talk for hours with my family and friends in the US
              for nothing above the flat rate I pay every month for my internet
              connection. If I want to call a landline or mobile phone in the US, I
              pay 2 euro-cents (about 2.7 US cents per minute). I have heard Yahoo
              Messenger is a bit cheaper for paid calls but my network is already
              established in Skype and I don't use Windows as my primary computer
              system so I've stayed. The downside of this approach is that you must
              have or find a computer and it cannot be used for emergency services
              like fire or ambulance. You can find out more about Skype and Yahoo
              Messenger at the following links:

              www.skype.com
              http://messenger.yahoo.com/webmessengerpromo.php

              I apologize for this rather longish post. If anyone wants more
              information, feel free to contact me directly.

              Paul in Bratislava
              Homebase in Carlisle, PA, USA
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