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NCOD birthplace

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  • nhasior@aol.com
    Some census records list NCOD as the birthplace for people I know were born in Slovakia. I googled this and cannot come up with anything that makes sense.
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 29, 2007
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      Some census records list NCOD as the birthplace for people I know were born
      in Slovakia. I googled this and cannot come up with anything that makes
      sense.
      Does anyone else notice this when researching census?
      Thank you.
      Noreen



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    • Andy Verostko
      I would suspect that it means, No Country Of Birth......... and that is the census taker was unable to obtain or understand the information given.... Regards
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 29, 2007
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        I would suspect that it means,

        No Country Of Birth.........

        and that is the census taker was unable to obtain or understand the
        information given....



        Regards Andy V......






        nhasior@... wrote:

        > Some census records list NCOD as the birthplace for people I know were
        > born
        > in Slovakia. I googled this and cannot come up with anything that makes
        > sense.
        > Does anyone else notice this when researching census?
        > Thank you.
        > Noreen
        >
        > ************************************** See what's free at
        > http://www.aol.com <http://www.aol.com>
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
      • nhasior@aol.com
        Hello Andy, Thanks for reply. You are probably correct in your reply. Noreen ... ************************************** See what s free at http://www.aol.com.
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 30, 2007
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          Hello Andy,
          Thanks for reply. You are probably correct in your reply.
          Noreen



          >>>>I would suspect that it means,

          >>>No Country Of Birth.......No

          >>>and that is the census taker was unable to obtain or understand the
          >>information given....

          >Regards Andy V......






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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Martin Votruba
          ... It is NCO_D_, not B for birth. It was an acronym provided by the Census Bureau to the census takers: In Census records, it stood for No Code --
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 30, 2007
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            >> Some census records list NCOD
            >
            > No Country Of Birth.........

            It is NCO_D_, not "B" for "birth."

            It was an acronym provided by the Census Bureau to the census takers:

            In Census records, it stood for "No Code" -- meaning that the person
            gave a country of origin (or some other information) for which the
            Census Bureau provided no code. E.g., if someone said "Saxony," the
            census taker looked it up and entered _KSAX_. That was the code
            provided by the Census Bureau. If someone said "Czechoslovakia," the
            code was CZEC, Austria was AUST (as oposed to AUSL, which was
            Australia), Hungary was HUNG.

            But if someone said _Slovakia_, there was no code for it and the
            census takers' instructions were to enter NCOD in such instances.


            Martin

            votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
          • nhasior@aol.com
            Martin, Thank you for the meaning of the entry NCOD on the census. I thought it was a code for a territory that was outside of the main, much like our
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 1, 2007
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              Martin,
              Thank you for the meaning of the entry NCOD on the census. I thought it was
              a code for a territory that was outside of the main, much like our
              Washington DC or the the Vatican and was considering that this may have been a code
              for a military area. It turned out to be nothing so historical or unusual.
              There were others using this code on the page and I wonder if these people
              insisted that they were Slovak and not Czechoslovakian. Previously, the census
              listed them as coming from Slovakland.
              Thank you.
              Noreen



              >>>It was an acronym provided by the Census Bureau to the census takers:

              >>>In Census records, it stood for "No Code" -- meaning that the person
              >>gave a country of origin (or some other information) for which the
              >>Census Bureau provided no code. E.g., if someone said "Saxony," the
              >>census taker looked it up and entered _KSAX_. That was the code
              >>provided by the Census Bureau. If someone said "Czechoslovakia,provi
              >>code was CZEC, Austria was AUST (as oposed to AUSL, which was
              >>Australia), Hungary was HUNG.

              >>But if someone said _Slovakia_, there was no code for it and the
              >>census takers' instructions were to enter NCOD in such instances.

              >>Martin







              ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


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            • Martin Votruba
              ... The initiative of the 1930 Census taker (or its absence) probably also played a role, Noreen -- to what degree s/he tried to determine an existing country
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 14, 2007
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                > There were others using this code on the page and I wonder
                > if these people insisted that they were Slovak and not
                > Czechoslovakian. Previously, the census listed them as
                > coming from Slovakland.

                The initiative of the 1930 Census taker (or its absence) probably also
                played a role, Noreen -- to what degree s/he tried to determine an
                existing country if he heard a name of a territory for which he found
                no code, and also his and the polled person's familiarity with
                Europe's current and historical geography. It was probably faster to
                enter NCOD when the census taker heard something he had no clue about
                than start a discussion.

                _Slovakland_ appeared in the 1920 census, i.e. before the Census
                Bureau introduced the country codes. If someone born in Banska
                Bystrica said "Czecho-Slovakia," that's what the census taker entered,
                and when the polled person said Hungary or Austria or Slovakland, that
                became the entry.

                _Slovakland_ was a meaningful English rendition. Czecho-Slovakia
                consisted of 4 administrative units ("centrally administered states")
                between 1918-1939 that were called "lands" (zem), not "states" like in
                the US: Slovak Land (zem Slovenska), Czech Land, Sub-Carpathian Land,
                and Moravian-Silesian Land. Prague copied the term from Germany which
                still calls its federal states "lands."
                |

                Martin

                votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
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