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Re: Country Name Changes thru History

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  • Plichta
    ... Martin, I don t make stuff up. I can only report what I read in sources that are well respected and known for their historical accuracy. In The
    Message 1 of 22 , Jun 3, 2007
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      >Austria was _not_ a republic during that time. _
      >Martin



      Martin,



      I don't make stuff up. I can only report what I read in sources that are
      well respected and known for their historical accuracy.



      In "The Statesman's YearBook" Edited by Brian Hunter, the 132nd Edition
      dated 1995-96, printed by St. Martin's Press, New York, it states on page
      156, under the article for Austria (Republik Oesterreich) and I quote
      directly: "History: Following the break-up of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,
      the Republic of Austria was proclaimed on 12 Nov. 1918." It then goes on to
      say that "On 12 March 1938 Austria was forcibly absorbed into Nazi Germany."



      If you are not familiar with "The Statesman's Yearbook" it is an annual
      publication, first published in 1864 and is used extensively as a primary
      reference source for diplomats around the world. The 2007 edition is the
      142nd year the reference has been published. From their website at:
      http://www.statesmansyearbook.com/public/about


      About The Statesman's Yearbook
      Dr Barry Turner, only the seventh editor in the 142-year history of The
      Statesman's Yearbook


      The Statesman's Yearbook was conceived of by Robert Carlyle and brought into
      being with the help of William Gladstone. Their vision for the book was an
      authoritative and accessible volume containing information essential for
      diplomats, politicians and all statesmen involved with international
      affairs. It quickly gained recognition as an indispensable reference tool
      and has been published continuously since 1864, through two world wars,
      without missing an edition. It was ranked by Library Journal as one of the
      top 20 best reference resources of the millennium.

      Today, international affairs concern almost every one of us and the scope of
      the book has become correspondingly broader, with expanded coverage of
      history, politics, economics, trade and infrastructure for each country, all
      thoroughly researched and verified by a dedicated editorial team. It also
      provides extensive further reading lists and web links for further research.

      In a world where opinion, propaganda and inaccuracy are frequently put
      forward as fact, The Statesman's Yearbook remains the first point of
      reference for anyone needing reliable, concise information on any country in
      the world.

      See the Reviews of The Statesman's
      <http://www.statesmansyearbook.com/public/reviews> Yearbook.



      Frank R. Plichta

      Galax, Virginia





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Martin Votruba
      ... I did n-o-t quote you about that, Frank. You did not place the Republic of Austria in the 19th century. Another post did and I quoted that post about it,
      Message 2 of 22 , Jun 3, 2007
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        > the Republic of Austria was proclaimed on 12 Nov. 1918."

        I did n-o-t quote you about that, Frank. You did not place the
        Republic of Austria in the 19th century. Another post did and I
        quoted that post about it, not yours.

        > the geographical area known as Galicia was a territory
        > within the political entity known as the Kingdom of Hungary.

        It never was.


        Martin

        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
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