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Re: [Slovak-World] kolbasi and cherries recipe

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  • e.gernat@att.net
    ... From: Dr. Joe Q Hi Dr Joe Q Did you post the reciepe for the kolbasi and cherry concoction? It was delecious but what was the
    Message 1 of 16 , Feb 23, 2007
      -------------- Original message ----------------------
      From: "Dr. Joe Q" <doctor_jq@...>

      Hi Dr Joe Q Did you post the reciepe for the kolbasi and cherry concoction? It was delecious
      but what was the other. I used 3lb of Turkey Kolbasi less fat and 1 can of sour cherry pie filling since I could not find just sour cherries in a can in NJ. Do you know what else I might have used? Thanks Edie



      > A "good" vodka used to marinate?? You can use lab
      > ethanol diluted to about 40% real alcohol content.
      > There are several good vodkas among them: Pravda and
      > Zytnia (both from rye and both from Bielsko Biala
      > Poland), Oliphant (Netherlands), Ultimate (grain and
      > potato Poland), Rain (corn Kentucky), Tito (grain
      > Texas), Turi (grain Estonia - peculiar flavor), and
      > the over priced Van Gogh (grain Holland), Grey Goose,
      > Stolichnaya (grain Russia), and Absolute. But I would
      > not use a "good" anything to marinate something. The
      > cherry flavor will overpower any subtle nuances of
      > flavor in a high priced vodka. Use the cheapest US
      > made vodka you can find, the $8 - $10 / 1.75 liter
      > stuff. It will do an excellent job and you can use
      > the left over money to buy a good vodka to drink with
      > the meal.
      >
      > I agree that Jell-o is not the thing to use and sour
      > cherries are the best. You can also use sour cherries
      > to stuff a small (thick cut 1 1/2 steak) and make a
      > marvelous meal.
      >
      > Just my thoughts.
      >
      > Na zdravie.
      >
      > Dr. "Q"
      >
      > --- Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@...> wrote:
      >
      > > As an amateur chef, I feel I need to ring in here.
      > > With any Kolbasi (Kolbasz, etc - SAUSAGE), the best
      > > thing to do is find sour cherries (Montmorency) that
      > > are marinated in either brandy or a good vodka -
      > > they tend to work well; sour cherries are hard to
      > > find. Jello - I don't think so!!! Then again, I'm
      > > not an expert and I don't run a bistro. No
      > > accounting for taste in anything at all, but Jello
      > > is nasty stuff, IMHO.
      > >
      > > Cheers!
      > >
      > > Paul Wolsko
      > >
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: Matchett
      > > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2007 11:06 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] kolbasi and cherries
      > > recipe
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi Edie, That's a strange combination, but it has
      > > my interest. Hope
      > > you get results from your e-mail and please post
      > > it online. Julia M.
      > >
      > > > HI to all, a while ago there was a recipe posted
      > > for Kolbasi and
      > > > cherry Jello but using canned cherries turned
      > > out to be better. I
      > > > can't find my recipe and I know that there was
      > > at least one other
      > > > ingredent. Please help. I made this when I
      > > visited my daughter and her
      > > > family in December and we all loved it. Thanks
      > > in advance
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dr. Joe Q
      Dear Edie, No, the recipe is unknown to me, though I have an idea as to how to prepare it. This was in response to the earlier posts about using cherries.
      Message 2 of 16 , Feb 23, 2007
        Dear Edie,

        No, the recipe is unknown to me, though I have an idea
        as to how to prepare it. This was in response to the
        earlier posts about using cherries. Sour cherries add
        a nice flavor and accent to meat dishes. They are
        used as a condiment - sparingly.

        Paul suggested marinating the cherries in vodka. I
        just added my opinion regarding the quality of vodka.
        Marinating in vodka, wine, burbon, scotch, rye, etc.
        should add a nice flavor.

        Dr. "Q"

        --- e.gernat@... wrote:

        >
        > -------------- Original message
        > ----------------------
        > From: "Dr. Joe Q" <doctor_jq@...>
        >
        > Hi Dr Joe Q Did you post the reciepe for the
        > kolbasi and cherry concoction? It was delecious
        > but what was the other. I used 3lb of Turkey Kolbasi
        > less fat and 1 can of sour cherry pie filling since
        > I could not find just sour cherries in a can in NJ.
        > Do you know what else I might have used? Thanks Edie
        >
        >
        >
        > > A "good" vodka used to marinate?? You can use lab
        > > ethanol diluted to about 40% real alcohol content.
        >
        > > There are several good vodkas among them: Pravda
        > and
        > > Zytnia (both from rye and both from Bielsko Biala
        > > Poland), Oliphant (Netherlands), Ultimate (grain
        > and
        > > potato Poland), Rain (corn Kentucky), Tito (grain
        > > Texas), Turi (grain Estonia - peculiar flavor),
        > and
        > > the over priced Van Gogh (grain Holland), Grey
        > Goose,
        > > Stolichnaya (grain Russia), and Absolute. But I
        > would
        > > not use a "good" anything to marinate something.
        > The
        > > cherry flavor will overpower any subtle nuances of
        > > flavor in a high priced vodka. Use the cheapest
        > US
        > > made vodka you can find, the $8 - $10 / 1.75 liter
        > > stuff. It will do an excellent job and you can
        > use
        > > the left over money to buy a good vodka to drink
        > with
        > > the meal.
        > >
        > > I agree that Jell-o is not the thing to use and
        > sour
        > > cherries are the best. You can also use sour
        > cherries
        > > to stuff a small (thick cut 1 1/2 steak) and make
        > a
        > > marvelous meal.
        > >
        > > Just my thoughts.
        > >
        > > Na zdravie.
        > >
        > > Dr. "Q"
        > >
        > > --- Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > > As an amateur chef, I feel I need to ring in
        > here.
        > > > With any Kolbasi (Kolbasz, etc - SAUSAGE), the
        > best
        > > > thing to do is find sour cherries (Montmorency)
        > that
        > > > are marinated in either brandy or a good vodka -
        > > > they tend to work well; sour cherries are hard
        > to
        > > > find. Jello - I don't think so!!! Then again,
        > I'm
        > > > not an expert and I don't run a bistro. No
        > > > accounting for taste in anything at all, but
        > Jello
        > > > is nasty stuff, IMHO.
        > > >
        > > > Cheers!
        > > >
        > > > Paul Wolsko
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > > From: Matchett
        > > > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        > > > Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2007 11:06 PM
        > > > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] kolbasi and
        > cherries
        > > > recipe
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Hi Edie, That's a strange combination, but it
        > has
        > > > my interest. Hope
        > > > you get results from your e-mail and please
        > post
        > > > it online. Julia M.
        > > >
        > > > > HI to all, a while ago there was a recipe
        > posted
        > > > for Kolbasi and
        > > > > cherry Jello but using canned cherries
        > turned
        > > > out to be better. I
        > > > > can't find my recipe and I know that there
        > was
        > > > at least one other
        > > > > ingredent. Please help. I made this when I
        > > > visited my daughter and her
        > > > > family in December and we all loved it.
        > Thanks
        > > > in advance



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      • David
        Not all quite true. Here in Lehighton, PA there is/was a fair size orchard of cherry trees. Yes the sour ones. They used to advertise about coming and picking
        Message 3 of 16 , Feb 24, 2007
          Not all quite true. Here in Lehighton, PA there is/was a fair size
          orchard of cherry trees. Yes the sour ones. They used to advertise
          about coming and picking your own and of course selling them.
          I have a couple of sour cherry trees on my property. But by the time
          they are ready to eat, the squirrels and birds nail them all. They
          don't save any for me. I also don't believe in spraying anything, but
          professional orchards do it all the time. Nobody wants to buy fruit
          that has worms in it or the outside skins (covering) don't look shiny red.
          Dave Kuchta

          At 05:55 PM 2/23/2007, you wrote:

          >True true, one CAN rehydrate sour cherries, which are hard-to-find.
          >
          >And, Julie, I did not grow up in Michigan (in New Jersey), but we
          >had a sour cherry tree in our yard, where I grew to love them
          >dearly. I know that Michigan is where they all seem to grow. About
          >20 years ago, I planted a small dwarf Montmorency cherry tree here
          >at our house in Sussex County, NJ. It's no dwarf anymore, but it
          >produces a nice crop each year; much to the glee of the Northern
          >Cardinals which are our best friends when they turn red. As it turns
          >out, in the past few years, they've developed a spot fungus on the
          >cherry when the fruit begins to set and ruins a lot of the fruit. I
          >could spray, but that's dangerous to birds and me. But we still get
          >sour cherries, which are nowhere to be found anywhere else. We
          >manage to get enough for my wife to make at least one good cherry
          >pie and every afternoon when I get home from work, I make sure I
          >stop and eat a bunch right then and there. Nothing like it!
          >
          >Paul Wolsko
          >
          >----- Original Message -----
          >From: Helen Fedor
          >To: <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          >Sent: Friday, February 23, 2007 9:27 AM
          >Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] kolbasi and cherries recipe
          >
          >You can always rehydrate dried sour cherries in the vodka. They're
          >not as widely available as, say, raisins, but if you have a Trader
          >Joe's or an equivalent, or someplace that sells different kinds of
          >dried fruits, you could get them there (I got some at TJ's a couple
          >of weeks ago for some cookies).
          >
          >H
          >
          > >>> "J. Michutka" <<mailto:jmm%40pathbridge.net>jmm@...>
          > 02/22/07 7:24 PM >>>
          >At 06:41 PM 2/22/2007, you wrote:
          > >As an amateur chef, I feel I need to ring in here. With any Kolbasi
          > >(Kolbasz, etc - SAUSAGE), the best thing to do is find sour cherries
          > >(Montmorency) that are marinated in either brandy or a good vodka -
          > >they tend to work well; sour cherries are hard to find.
          >
          >Sour cherries are the ONLY kind of cherries, IMHO! Those sweet
          >things that resemble them are aberrations. People here in New
          >England don't know about sour cherries :( As far as I can tell,
          >they are impossible to find out of season, except in a can of pie
          >filling. They don't travel well, either, so even the couple times
          >(in 20 years) that I've found them in gourmet stores here, they were
          >disappointing.
          >
          >Paul, are you in Michigan? That's where I grew up, eating sour
          >cherries from our trees in the back yard!
          >
          >Julie Michutka
          ><mailto:jmm%40pathbridge.net>jmm@...
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
        • Joe Armata
          I think this is the recipe people are talking about. I once posted this recipe here from someone in a club I belong to, and he swears it s great, though I ve
          Message 4 of 16 , Feb 24, 2007
            I think this is the recipe people are talking about. I once
            posted this recipe here from someone in a club I belong to, and
            he swears it's great, though I've never made it.

            One three-pound package of kolbasi, cut into 1/2" chunks
            One package cherry Kool-Aid, unsweetened
            One cup sugar
            One cup water
            Three ounces yellow mustard

            Mix the last four ingredients in a big pot. Add kolbasi and put
            on high heat for about 30 minutes. Stir often. The syrup will
            draw water out of the kolbasi, thinning it. Keep boiling it. As
            syrup thickens, it will want to burn if you don't keep stirring.
            Turn the heat down for another 15 minutes or so, not crucial.
            Serve warm because the fat from the kolbasi looks gross if it
            congeals.


            Joe Armata
          • e.gernat@att.net
            ... From: Joe Armata Hi Joe Thank you Thank you, I forgot the yellow mustard. As I said I used 1 can of sour cherry pie filling because we
            Message 5 of 16 , Feb 25, 2007
              -------------- Original message ----------------------
              From: Joe Armata <armata+@...>

              Hi Joe Thank you Thank you, I forgot the yellow mustard. As I said I used 1 can of sour cherry pie filling because we could not find sour cherries in a can at that time. It is delecious!!!
              Edie



              > I think this is the recipe people are talking about. I once
              > posted this recipe here from someone in a club I belong to, and
              > he swears it's great, though I've never made it.
              >
              > One three-pound package of kolbasi, cut into 1/2" chunks
              > One package cherry Kool-Aid, unsweetened
              > One cup sugar
              > One cup water
              > Three ounces yellow mustard
              >
              > Mix the last four ingredients in a big pot. Add kolbasi and put
              > on high heat for about 30 minutes. Stir often. The syrup will
              > draw water out of the kolbasi, thinning it. Keep boiling it. As
              > syrup thickens, it will want to burn if you don't keep stirring.
              > Turn the heat down for another 15 minutes or so, not crucial.
              > Serve warm because the fat from the kolbasi looks gross if it
              > congeals.
              >
              >
              > Joe Armata
              >





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