Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC

Expand Messages
  • Bill Tarkulich
    Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC In case you missed it, a good article on Employment prospects in Slovakia, done by the BBC in November, 2002: Friday, 29
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 31, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC

      In case you missed it, a good article on Employment prospects in
      Slovakia, done by the BBC in November, 2002:

      Friday, 29 November, 2002, 17:20 GMT
      Making Slovakia work

      http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/2516025.stm

      Bill Tarkulich
    • Matchett
      Bill, thanks for calling the article to our attention. I was interested in reading about the youth leaving Slovakia. It reminded me of a young Czech relative
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 31, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Bill, thanks for calling the article to our attention. I was
        interested in reading about the youth leaving Slovakia. It reminded me
        of a young Czech relative who was interested in working in America.
        That must have been about 10 or more years ago. He stayed in Bohemia
        and started a business (building garages and gas stations). He has
        prospered greatly.

        I know a lot of Slovak youth are working in America but when Slovakia
        gets into the EU, the multinational companies will head to Slovakia and
        the exodus should slow down. Julia M.

        On Friday, January 31, 2003, at 07:57 AM, Bill Tarkulich wrote:

        > Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC
        >
        > In case you missed it, a good article on Employment prospects in
        > Slovakia, done by the BBC in November, 2002:
        >
        > Friday, 29 November, 2002, 17:20 GMT
        > Making Slovakia work
        >
        > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/2516025.stm
        >
        > Bill Tarkulich
        >
      • Bill Tarkulich
        The population statistics in the eastern villages of Slovakia are dreadful. Many of the villages have been characterized by the locals as dying. At first I
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 31, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          The population statistics in the eastern villages of Slovakia are
          dreadful. Many of the villages have been characterized by the locals as
          "dying." At first I passed this off as alarmist, until I began to
          research the trends. In the Ulic' valley I saw but a couple of young
          children in an entire week. It is predominantly an over-50 population.


          Since 1970, the overall population of the region is down 51%. Here is
          one example, from the village of Zboj (northeastern Slovakia):

          Year Population
          1787 528
          1828 653
          1869 533
          1880 523
          1890 688
          1900 823
          1910 1002
          1921 926
          1930 1108
          1940 1238
          1948 968
          1961 1114
          1970 1128
          1980 950
          1991 657
          2001 448
          All of the young I met from these villages has moved to Bratislava,
          Kosice, Humenne, and so on for work and higher education. Many would
          like to come to the USA, but the immigration restrictions are making it
          nearly impossible. Still, this does not deter them from finding a
          "better life." Many I know equate learning English as their "ticket to
          success" as their nation transforms. I cannot disagree.

          This is fairly typical of most villages in the region. The number of
          abandonded homes is shocking.

          I recognize that poor, small towns worldwide continually experience
          outward emigration, and that without something to attract growth, the
          villages will always stagnate. The reason I'm most alarmed is that
          these are our ancestral villages. I wonder what they will look like in
          another 30 years.

          Bill Tarkulich

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Matchett [mailto:wmatchett@...]
          Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 9:52 AM
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC


          Bill, thanks for calling the article to our attention. I was
          interested in reading about the youth leaving Slovakia. It reminded me
          of a young Czech relative who was interested in working in America.
          That must have been about 10 or more years ago. He stayed in Bohemia
          and started a business (building garages and gas stations). He has
          prospered greatly.

          I know a lot of Slovak youth are working in America but when Slovakia
          gets into the EU, the multinational companies will head to Slovakia and
          the exodus should slow down. Julia M.

          On Friday, January 31, 2003, at 07:57 AM, Bill Tarkulich wrote:

          > Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC
          >
          > In case you missed it, a good article on Employment prospects in
          > Slovakia, done by the BBC in November, 2002:
          >
          > Friday, 29 November, 2002, 17:20 GMT
          > Making Slovakia work
          >
          > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/2516025.stm
          >
          > Bill Tarkulich
          >


          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        • David
          Bill: This is no different than many of the towns in the hard coal regions of PA. At one time, my home town of Lansford had over 10,000 people. Now it has
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 31, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            Bill: This is no different than many of the towns in the hard coal regions
            of PA. At one time, my home town of Lansford had over 10,000 people. Now it
            has about 4,000. What has happened is the town has became a bedroom
            community with the people traveling over 50 miles to go to work. As the old
            timers died off, their kids, who were educated and moved away for better
            paying jobs sell the homes. Some of the prices are ridiculously cheap. What
            this has done is reversed the homes from becoming empty and dilapidated and
            being sold to people from out of the area. Many from NY and NJ. They sell
            their homes there for big bucks, buy the old homes in Lansford, fix them up
            and bank the rest of the money. Problem is that a lot of outsiders with no
            money, buy the homes and let them become uninhabitable. That's the down side.
            This is happening throughout the entire coal regions.
            Dave

            At 10:19 AM 1/31/2003 -0500, you wrote:
            >The population statistics in the eastern villages of Slovakia are
            >dreadful. Many of the villages have been characterized by the locals as
            >"dying." At first I passed this off as alarmist, until I began to
            >research the trends. In the Ulic' valley I saw but a couple of young
            >children in an entire week. It is predominantly an over-50 population.
            >
            >
            >Since 1970, the overall population of the region is down 51%. Here is
            >one example, from the village of Zboj (northeastern Slovakia):
            >
            >Year Population
            >1787 528
            >1828 653
            >1869 533
            >1880 523
            >1890 688
            >1900 823
            >1910 1002
            >1921 926
            >1930 1108
            >1940 1238
            >1948 968
            >1961 1114
            >1970 1128
            >1980 950
            >1991 657
            >2001 448
            >All of the young I met from these villages has moved to Bratislava,
            >Kosice, Humenne, and so on for work and higher education. Many would
            >like to come to the USA, but the immigration restrictions are making it
            >nearly impossible. Still, this does not deter them from finding a
            >"better life." Many I know equate learning English as their "ticket to
            >success" as their nation transforms. I cannot disagree.
            >
            >This is fairly typical of most villages in the region. The number of
            >abandonded homes is shocking.
            >
            >I recognize that poor, small towns worldwide continually experience
            >outward emigration, and that without something to attract growth, the
            >villages will always stagnate. The reason I'm most alarmed is that
            >these are our ancestral villages. I wonder what they will look like in
            >another 30 years.
            >
            >Bill Tarkulich
            >
            >-----Original Message-----
            >From: Matchett [mailto:wmatchett@...]
            >Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 9:52 AM
            >To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC
            >
            >
            >Bill, thanks for calling the article to our attention. I was
            >interested in reading about the youth leaving Slovakia. It reminded me
            >of a young Czech relative who was interested in working in America.
            >That must have been about 10 or more years ago. He stayed in Bohemia
            >and started a business (building garages and gas stations). He has
            >prospered greatly.
            >
            >I know a lot of Slovak youth are working in America but when Slovakia
            >gets into the EU, the multinational companies will head to Slovakia and
            >the exodus should slow down. Julia M.
            >
            >On Friday, January 31, 2003, at 07:57 AM, Bill Tarkulich wrote:
            >
            > > Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC
            > >
            > > In case you missed it, a good article on Employment prospects in
            > > Slovakia, done by the BBC in November, 2002:
            > >
            > > Friday, 29 November, 2002, 17:20 GMT
            > > Making Slovakia work
            > >
            > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/2516025.stm
            > >
            > > Bill Tarkulich
            > >
            >
            >
            >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            >Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            >http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            >Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • Bill Tarkulich
            Hi Dave, I agree, hence my comment small towns worldwide continually experience ... The difference I see however is that these villages stand little chance of
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 31, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Dave,
              I agree, hence my comment "small towns worldwide continually experience
              >outward emigration"
              The difference I see however is that these villages stand little chance
              of becoming "bedroom communities" since it's inhabitants are relatively
              immobile. Autos remain unaffordable given the prevailing wage scale and
              the regional bus only stops twice a day in the villages. So, it's
              similar to the "sticks" in America, but without automobiles. Even those
              well off enough to afford a nice place in the mountains don't have to
              travel so far - there are many beautiful places, much closer to
              commerce. My sense is that the villages will continue to drop in
              population and many houses crumble, before and if opportunties arise.
              The other distinction I see is that these villages are rapidly losing
              critical mass - that is, the number of people must be large enough to
              support essential services a store, gas station (a moot point), medical
              outpost, schools, priests, etc. The villages have already banded
              together regionally in response, but even this is too small.

              If you look at the stats, you'd find that all of these villages
              population levels have declined below where they were in the mid 1800s.


              Interestingly, Nova Sedlica was intially settled in the mid 1700s, then
              abandonded for about 20 decades shortly thereafter when it's citizens
              deemed the land "unihabitable" due to the harsh working conditions.


              -----Original Message-----
              From: David [mailto:humblebe@...]
              Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 2:14 PM
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC


              Bill: This is no different than many of the towns in the hard coal
              regions
              of PA. At one time, my home town of Lansford had over 10,000 people. Now
              it
              has about 4,000. What has happened is the town has became a bedroom
              community with the people traveling over 50 miles to go to work. As the
              old
              timers died off, their kids, who were educated and moved away for better

              paying jobs sell the homes. Some of the prices are ridiculously cheap.
              What
              this has done is reversed the homes from becoming empty and dilapidated
              and
              being sold to people from out of the area. Many from NY and NJ. They
              sell
              their homes there for big bucks, buy the old homes in Lansford, fix them
              up
              and bank the rest of the money. Problem is that a lot of outsiders with
              no
              money, buy the homes and let them become uninhabitable. That's the down
              side. This is happening throughout the entire coal regions. Dave

              At 10:19 AM 1/31/2003 -0500, you wrote:
              >The population statistics in the eastern villages of Slovakia are
              >dreadful. Many of the villages have been characterized by the locals
              >as "dying." At first I passed this off as alarmist, until I began to
              >research the trends. In the Ulic' valley I saw but a couple of young
              >children in an entire week. It is predominantly an over-50 population.
              >
              >
              >Since 1970, the overall population of the region is down 51%. Here is
              >one example, from the village of Zboj (northeastern Slovakia):
              >
              >Year Population
              >1787 528
              >1828 653
              >1869 533
              >1880 523
              >1890 688
              >1900 823
              >1910 1002
              >1921 926
              >1930 1108
              >1940 1238
              >1948 968
              >1961 1114
              >1970 1128
              >1980 950
              >1991 657
              >2001 448
              >All of the young I met from these villages has moved to Bratislava,
              >Kosice, Humenne, and so on for work and higher education. Many would
              >like to come to the USA, but the immigration restrictions are making it

              >nearly impossible. Still, this does not deter them from finding a
              >"better life." Many I know equate learning English as their "ticket to

              >success" as their nation transforms. I cannot disagree.
              >
              >This is fairly typical of most villages in the region. The number of
              >abandonded homes is shocking.
              >
              >I recognize that poor, small towns worldwide continually experience
              >outward emigration, and that without something to attract growth, the
              >villages will always stagnate. The reason I'm most alarmed is that
              >these are our ancestral villages. I wonder what they will look like in

              >another 30 years.
              >
              >Bill Tarkulich
              >
              >-----Original Message-----
              >From: Matchett [mailto:wmatchett@...]
              >Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 9:52 AM
              >To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC
              >
              >
              >Bill, thanks for calling the article to our attention. I was
              >interested in reading about the youth leaving Slovakia. It reminded me

              >of a young Czech relative who was interested in working in America.
              >That must have been about 10 or more years ago. He stayed in Bohemia
              >and started a business (building garages and gas stations). He has
              >prospered greatly.
              >
              >I know a lot of Slovak youth are working in America but when Slovakia
              >gets into the EU, the multinational companies will head to Slovakia and

              >the exodus should slow down. Julia M.
              >
              >On Friday, January 31, 2003, at 07:57 AM, Bill Tarkulich wrote:
              >
              > > Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC
              > >
              > > In case you missed it, a good article on Employment prospects in
              > > Slovakia, done by the BBC in November, 2002:
              > >
              > > Friday, 29 November, 2002, 17:20 GMT
              > > Making Slovakia work
              > >
              > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/2516025.stm
              > >
              > > Bill Tarkulich
              > >
              >
              >
              >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              >Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              >http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              >Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              >http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



              To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            • David
              Bill: Well done. My ancestors lived in Western Slovakia. Here is something that might be of interest, and that is that both the old Kuchta and Zloch
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 31, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                Bill: Well done. My ancestors lived in Western Slovakia. Here is something
                that might be of interest, and that is that both the old Kuchta and Zloch
                residences, which were abandoned and sort of run down, are both being fixed
                up and used as summer cottages or summer homes. Another home near my
                cousins farm, is also being used as a summer home. So, maybe there is a
                chance of a second life coming from these old towns and villages. Let's
                hope so.
                Dave Kuchta
                At 03:35 PM 1/31/2003 -0500, you wrote:
                >Hi Dave,
                >I agree, hence my comment "small towns worldwide continually experience
                > >outward emigration"
                >The difference I see however is that these villages stand little chance
                >of becoming "bedroom communities" since it's inhabitants are relatively
                >immobile. Autos remain unaffordable given the prevailing wage scale and
                >the regional bus only stops twice a day in the villages. So, it's
                >similar to the "sticks" in America, but without automobiles. Even those
                >well off enough to afford a nice place in the mountains don't have to
                >travel so far - there are many beautiful places, much closer to
                >commerce. My sense is that the villages will continue to drop in
                >population and many houses crumble, before and if opportunties arise.
                >The other distinction I see is that these villages are rapidly losing
                >critical mass - that is, the number of people must be large enough to
                >support essential services a store, gas station (a moot point), medical
                >outpost, schools, priests, etc. The villages have already banded
                >together regionally in response, but even this is too small.
                >
                >If you look at the stats, you'd find that all of these villages
                >population levels have declined below where they were in the mid 1800s.
                >
                >
                >Interestingly, Nova Sedlica was intially settled in the mid 1700s, then
                >abandonded for about 20 decades shortly thereafter when it's citizens
                >deemed the land "unihabitable" due to the harsh working conditions.
                >
                >
                >-----Original Message-----
                >From: David [mailto:humblebe@...]
                >Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 2:14 PM
                >To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                >Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC
                >
                >
                >Bill: This is no different than many of the towns in the hard coal
                >regions
                >of PA. At one time, my home town of Lansford had over 10,000 people. Now
                >it
                >has about 4,000. What has happened is the town has became a bedroom
                >community with the people traveling over 50 miles to go to work. As the
                >old
                >timers died off, their kids, who were educated and moved away for better
                >
                >paying jobs sell the homes. Some of the prices are ridiculously cheap.
                >What
                >this has done is reversed the homes from becoming empty and dilapidated
                >and
                >being sold to people from out of the area. Many from NY and NJ. They
                >sell
                >their homes there for big bucks, buy the old homes in Lansford, fix them
                >up
                >and bank the rest of the money. Problem is that a lot of outsiders with
                >no
                >money, buy the homes and let them become uninhabitable. That's the down
                >side. This is happening throughout the entire coal regions. Dave
                >
                >At 10:19 AM 1/31/2003 -0500, you wrote:
                > >The population statistics in the eastern villages of Slovakia are
                > >dreadful. Many of the villages have been characterized by the locals
                > >as "dying." At first I passed this off as alarmist, until I began to
                > >research the trends. In the Ulic' valley I saw but a couple of young
                > >children in an entire week. It is predominantly an over-50 population.
                > >
                > >
                > >Since 1970, the overall population of the region is down 51%. Here is
                > >one example, from the village of Zboj (northeastern Slovakia):
                > >
                > >Year Population
                > >1787 528
                > >1828 653
                > >1869 533
                > >1880 523
                > >1890 688
                > >1900 823
                > >1910 1002
                > >1921 926
                > >1930 1108
                > >1940 1238
                > >1948 968
                > >1961 1114
                > >1970 1128
                > >1980 950
                > >1991 657
                > >2001 448
                > >All of the young I met from these villages has moved to Bratislava,
                > >Kosice, Humenne, and so on for work and higher education. Many would
                > >like to come to the USA, but the immigration restrictions are making it
                >
                > >nearly impossible. Still, this does not deter them from finding a
                > >"better life." Many I know equate learning English as their "ticket to
                >
                > >success" as their nation transforms. I cannot disagree.
                > >
                > >This is fairly typical of most villages in the region. The number of
                > >abandonded homes is shocking.
                > >
                > >I recognize that poor, small towns worldwide continually experience
                > >outward emigration, and that without something to attract growth, the
                > >villages will always stagnate. The reason I'm most alarmed is that
                > >these are our ancestral villages. I wonder what they will look like in
                >
                > >another 30 years.
                > >
                > >Bill Tarkulich
                > >
                > >-----Original Message-----
                > >From: Matchett [mailto:wmatchett@...]
                > >Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 9:52 AM
                > >To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                > >Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC
                > >
                > >
                > >Bill, thanks for calling the article to our attention. I was
                > >interested in reading about the youth leaving Slovakia. It reminded me
                >
                > >of a young Czech relative who was interested in working in America.
                > >That must have been about 10 or more years ago. He stayed in Bohemia
                > >and started a business (building garages and gas stations). He has
                > >prospered greatly.
                > >
                > >I know a lot of Slovak youth are working in America but when Slovakia
                > >gets into the EU, the multinational companies will head to Slovakia and
                >
                > >the exodus should slow down. Julia M.
                > >
                > >On Friday, January 31, 2003, at 07:57 AM, Bill Tarkulich wrote:
                > >
                > > > Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC
                > > >
                > > > In case you missed it, a good article on Employment prospects in
                > > > Slovakia, done by the BBC in November, 2002:
                > > >
                > > > Friday, 29 November, 2002, 17:20 GMT
                > > > Making Slovakia work
                > > >
                > > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/2516025.stm
                > > >
                > > > Bill Tarkulich
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > >Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                > >http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                > >
                > >
                > >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > >Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                > >http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >
                >
                >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                >Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                >
                >
                >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                >http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >
                >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                >Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                >
                >
                >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              • Bill Tarkulich
                Dave, That s a good point about summer cottages. A relative of mine married into a family who s parents are university professors in Bratislava. They have
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 31, 2003
                • 0 Attachment
                  Dave,
                  That's a good point about summer cottages. A relative of mine married
                  into a family who's parents are university professors in Bratislava.
                  They have fixed up a home also as a summer cottage. I'd like to hope
                  there are a lot of fixer-uppers, but unfortunately, most people are not
                  well enough off as these professors to be able to afford to purchase.
                  Unfortunately, for most people, home ownership is still a dream. I
                  suspect it will be generation or two before this situation begins to
                  change. In the mean time, it still rains and snows on abandonded
                  homes....
                  Bill

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: David [mailto:humblebe@...]
                  Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 4:51 PM
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC


                  Bill: Well done. My ancestors lived in Western Slovakia. Here is
                  something
                  that might be of interest, and that is that both the old Kuchta and
                  Zloch
                  residences, which were abandoned and sort of run down, are both being
                  fixed
                  up and used as summer cottages or summer homes. Another home near my
                  cousins farm, is also being used as a summer home. So, maybe there is a
                  chance of a second life coming from these old towns and villages. Let's
                  hope so.
                  Dave Kuchta
                  At 03:35 PM 1/31/2003 -0500, you wrote:
                  >Hi Dave,
                  >I agree, hence my comment "small towns worldwide continually experience
                  > >outward emigration"
                  >The difference I see however is that these villages stand little chance

                  >of becoming "bedroom communities" since it's inhabitants are relatively

                  >immobile. Autos remain unaffordable given the prevailing wage scale
                  >and the regional bus only stops twice a day in the villages. So, it's
                  >similar to the "sticks" in America, but without automobiles. Even
                  >those well off enough to afford a nice place in the mountains don't
                  >have to travel so far - there are many beautiful places, much closer to

                  >commerce. My sense is that the villages will continue to drop in
                  >population and many houses crumble, before and if opportunties arise.
                  >The other distinction I see is that these villages are rapidly losing
                  >critical mass - that is, the number of people must be large enough to
                  >support essential services a store, gas station (a moot point), medical

                  >outpost, schools, priests, etc. The villages have already banded
                  >together regionally in response, but even this is too small.
                  >
                  >If you look at the stats, you'd find that all of these villages
                  >population levels have declined below where they were in the mid 1800s.
                  >
                  >
                  >Interestingly, Nova Sedlica was intially settled in the mid 1700s, then

                  >abandonded for about 20 decades shortly thereafter when it's citizens
                  >deemed the land "unihabitable" due to the harsh working conditions.
                  >
                  >
                  >-----Original Message-----
                  >From: David [mailto:humblebe@...]
                  >Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 2:14 PM
                  >To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  >Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC
                  >
                  >
                  >Bill: This is no different than many of the towns in the hard coal
                  >regions of PA. At one time, my home town of Lansford had over 10,000
                  >people. Now it
                  >has about 4,000. What has happened is the town has became a bedroom
                  >community with the people traveling over 50 miles to go to work. As the
                  >old
                  >timers died off, their kids, who were educated and moved away for
                  better
                  >
                  >paying jobs sell the homes. Some of the prices are ridiculously cheap.
                  >What this has done is reversed the homes from becoming empty and
                  >dilapidated and
                  >being sold to people from out of the area. Many from NY and NJ. They
                  >sell
                  >their homes there for big bucks, buy the old homes in Lansford, fix
                  them
                  >up
                  >and bank the rest of the money. Problem is that a lot of outsiders with
                  >no
                  >money, buy the homes and let them become uninhabitable. That's the down
                  >side. This is happening throughout the entire coal regions. Dave
                  >
                  >At 10:19 AM 1/31/2003 -0500, you wrote:
                  > >The population statistics in the eastern villages of Slovakia are
                  > >dreadful. Many of the villages have been characterized by the locals

                  > >as "dying." At first I passed this off as alarmist, until I began to

                  > >research the trends. In the Ulic' valley I saw but a couple of young

                  > >children in an entire week. It is predominantly an over-50
                  > >population.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >Since 1970, the overall population of the region is down 51%. Here
                  > >is one example, from the village of Zboj (northeastern Slovakia):
                  > >
                  > >Year Population
                  > >1787 528
                  > >1828 653
                  > >1869 533
                  > >1880 523
                  > >1890 688
                  > >1900 823
                  > >1910 1002
                  > >1921 926
                  > >1930 1108
                  > >1940 1238
                  > >1948 968
                  > >1961 1114
                  > >1970 1128
                  > >1980 950
                  > >1991 657
                  > >2001 448
                  > >All of the young I met from these villages has moved to Bratislava,
                  > >Kosice, Humenne, and so on for work and higher education. Many would

                  > >like to come to the USA, but the immigration restrictions are making
                  > >it
                  >
                  > >nearly impossible. Still, this does not deter them from finding a
                  > >"better life." Many I know equate learning English as their "ticket
                  > >to
                  >
                  > >success" as their nation transforms. I cannot disagree.
                  > >
                  > >This is fairly typical of most villages in the region. The number of

                  > >abandonded homes is shocking.
                  > >
                  > >I recognize that poor, small towns worldwide continually experience
                  > >outward emigration, and that without something to attract growth, the

                  > >villages will always stagnate. The reason I'm most alarmed is that
                  > >these are our ancestral villages. I wonder what they will look like
                  > >in
                  >
                  > >another 30 years.
                  > >
                  > >Bill Tarkulich
                  > >
                  > >-----Original Message-----
                  > >From: Matchett [mailto:wmatchett@...]
                  > >Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 9:52 AM
                  > >To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  > >Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >Bill, thanks for calling the article to our attention. I was
                  > >interested in reading about the youth leaving Slovakia. It reminded
                  > >me
                  >
                  > >of a young Czech relative who was interested in working in America.
                  > >That must have been about 10 or more years ago. He stayed in Bohemia

                  > >and started a business (building garages and gas stations). He has
                  > >prospered greatly.
                  > >
                  > >I know a lot of Slovak youth are working in America but when Slovakia

                  > >gets into the EU, the multinational companies will head to Slovakia
                  > >and
                  >
                  > >the exodus should slow down. Julia M.
                  > >
                  > >On Friday, January 31, 2003, at 07:57 AM, Bill Tarkulich wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > Employment prospects in Slovakia, BBC
                  > > >
                  > > > In case you missed it, a good article on Employment prospects in
                  > > > Slovakia, done by the BBC in November, 2002:
                  > > >
                  > > > Friday, 29 November, 2002, 17:20 GMT
                  > > > Making Slovakia work
                  > > >
                  > > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/2516025.stm
                  > > >
                  > > > Bill Tarkulich
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > >Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  > >http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > >Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  > >http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  >Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  >http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  >Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  >http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



                  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                • Jan Lan
                  At 07:50 PM 1/31/2003 -0500, you wrote: Bill: Well done. My ancestors lived in Western Slovakia. Here is something that might be of interest, and that is
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 31, 2003
                  • 0 Attachment
                    At 07:50 PM 1/31/2003 -0500, you wrote:
                    >Bill: Well done. My ancestors lived in Western Slovakia. Here is something
                    >that might be of interest, and that is that both the old Kuchta and Zloch
                    >residences, which were abandoned and sort of run down, are both being fixed
                    >up and used as summer cottages or summer homes. Another home near my
                    >cousins farm, is also being used as a summer home. So, maybe there is a
                    >chance of a second life coming from these old towns and villages. Let's
                    >hope so.
                    >Dave Kuchta

                    I see the same in my mother's village near Bardejov. City dwellers have
                    built a few attractive summer (possibly winter vacation also) homes in the
                    village. There is a ski tow and slope on the outskirts of the
                    village. That may be an added attraction. I remember being surprised at
                    finding snow making equipment at the bottom of the slope. Unfortunately,
                    not many of the original families remain in the area even though it is just
                    a few kilometer bus ride to Bardejov.

                    I'm not too familiar with the economics of the area (or economics for that
                    matter) but I know it is currently down. One of my cousins in Bardejov
                    received his Ing about a year ago and had a hard time locating work until
                    recently when he found a job at a new supermarket that was opening. I
                    believe he is part of the management staff. His sister just completed high
                    school (our equivalent of a bachelors degree I believe) and is fluent in
                    English. I'm not certain she will be able to stay in the area but her
                    prospects for finding a job somewhere are probably better because of her
                    English abilities. The need to be at least bilingual in Europe is almost a
                    necessity. With the EU adding members there is hope for a slow recovery.

                    As for what happens to ancestral villages, about what happened to many of
                    our towns and villages as the industrial revolution moved into gear. They
                    either became ghost towns and eventually disappeared or dropped to a
                    minimum sustainable size as Bill mentioned. I noticed that some of the
                    nearby city dwellers still retained their village properties or helped
                    relatives keep them so they could have a large zahrad to supplement their
                    food budgets.

                    Janko


                    __________________________________________________
                    Do you Yahoo!?
                    Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
                    http://mailplus.yahoo.com
                  • Nick Holcz
                    Yes, small towns are disappearing in Australia as well.In our agricultural areas small farms are disappearing, they are being combined into big properties
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jan 31, 2003
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Yes, small towns are disappearing in Australia as well.In our agricultural
                      areas small farms are disappearing, they are being combined into big
                      properties worked by less people. Towns are losing services and dying out.

                      Unfortunate but most people are forced to move to the cities like economic
                      refugees.

                      Nick

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.