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Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese after wine

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  • Lil Junas
    Well, obviously this cheese should not be a protected product only from Poland. But, it could be a protected product from both countries. I often wondered
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 5, 2007
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      Well, obviously this cheese should not be a protected product only
      from Poland. But, it could be a protected product from both countries.
      I often wondered years ago why Slovakia didn't try selling smoked
      sheep cheese abroad. It's excellent. But perhaps the Slovaks have been
      more laid back when it comes to selling consumer goods.

      One thing for sure, the Slovak ostiepok is much better tasting than
      the Polish counterpart, in my opinion and also the opinion of some of
      my Slovak friends. Last May I took my small group of college students
      to a salas in Poland (just across the border from Cerveny Klastor)
      where we watched how they formed the curd and smoked their cheese.
      Then everyone bought a piece that looked just like those in the photo
      that Martin attached to his message.

      But the taste, as I said, was no match for what we got from the Valca
      and Klastor sheep farms (south of Martin) and from a sheep farm near
      Cerveny Klastor. So, I hope the Slovaks win their dispute.
      Lil

      On 2/5/07, Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@...> wrote:
      > HAHAHA!!!! An international dispute over cheese - I love it! Good thing
      > that God gave man free will - proves beyond a doubt that He has a good sense
      > of humor.
      >
      > Paul Wolsko
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Martin Votruba
      > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Monday, February 05, 2007 3:39 PM
      > Subject: [Slovak-World] Cheese after wine
      >
      >
      > After Bratislava sorted out its right to the dessert wine label
      > Tokaj/Tokay claimed exclusively by Hungary, it has embarked on a
      > dispute about cheese with Poland.
      >
      > Only hours before the deadline, Slovakia submitted its objection to
      > Poland's application six months ago to have the football-shaped smoked
      > sheep cheese os~tiepok (oscypek/oszczypek in Polish) registered with
      > the European Union as a protected Polish product.
      >
      > Ostiepok has traditionally been produced in the Tatra region on both
      > sides of the Slovak-Polish border.
      >
      > The Slovak ostiepok (next to the radishes - brownish):
      >
      > http://tinyurl.com/35thwq
      >
      > One of the two traditional shapes of the Polish oscypek:
      >
      > http://tinyurl.com/2aqnf4
      >
      > Slovak commentators criticize Bratislava for being merely reactive in
      > such matters, often at the very last moment.
      >
      > Martin
      >
      > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Martin Votruba
      ... Yes, it s become similar to disputes about trademarks. The US--Czech battle over Budweiser, originally also just a regional designation, has still not
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 5, 2007
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        > HAHAHA!!!! An international dispute over cheese

        Yes, it's become similar to disputes about trademarks. The US--Czech
        battle over Budweiser, originally also just a regional designation,
        has still not been legally resolved.

        The European Union has been granting exclusive rights to the names of
        various traditional European food products. Should Poland get the
        exclusive rights to "ostiepok," Slovakia would have to change its name
        (at least for export). Exclusive "country" rights to, or "formula
        standards" for the names of a number of traditional cheeses, liquors,
        other products that didn't use to be trademarks have already been
        legislated.

        The EU has speeded up this process somewhat recently, and expanded it
        enormously. In the past the dispute over the Greek claim to feta
        cheese, for example, took about 20 years to resolve.

        BTW, a major pan-European battle going on now is about what can/cannot
        be called "vodka."

        Martin

        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
      • amiak27
        Jumping back to a cheese war from last February, there was discussion about a Slovak-Polish argument for the rights to a special cheese from the Tatra
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 5, 2007
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          Jumping back to a 'cheese war' from last February, there was
          discussion about a Slovak-Polish argument for the rights to a special
          cheese from the Tatra Mountain region. I just stumbled across a
          Polish site, in English, presenting their side - and showing a map of
          the area that includes primarily Slovakia. They make some intersting
          statements such as
          "Podhale, nestled high up in the Tatra Mountains on the Polish side of
          the Polish and Slovak border"
          "Podhale has been changing hands of foreign suitors many a time"
          "Although the Tatra region spreads to Slovakia, this type of cheese is
          only made in Poland."
          "The regions of Podhale, Orawa and Spis are all located on the
          southern border of Poland, neighboring Slovakia."

          http://www.american.edu/TED/polish-cheese.htm#IIdentification

          The European commissioners must have had a tough time keeping straight
          faces when they heard the arguments for exclusive rights to this cheese!

          Ron



          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > > HAHAHA!!!! An international dispute over cheese
          >
          > Yes, it's become similar to disputes about trademarks. The
          US--Czech > battle over Budweiser, originally also just a regional
          designation, > has still not been legally resolved.
          >
          > The European Union has been granting exclusive rights to the names
          of > various traditional European food products. Should Poland get
          the > exclusive rights to "ostiepok," Slovakia would have to change
          its name > (at least for export). Exclusive "country" rights to, or
          "formula > standards" for the names of a number of traditional
          cheeses, liquors, > other products that didn't use to be trademarks
          have already been > legislated.
          >
          > The EU has speeded up this process somewhat recently, and expanded
          it > enormously. In the past the dispute over the Greek claim to feta
          > cheese, for example, took about 20 years to resolve.
          >
          > BTW, a major pan-European battle going on now is about what
          can/cannot > be called "vodka."
          >
          > Martin
          >
          > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
          >
        • Paul Guzowski
          Sounds like the age-old argument over the sparkling wine called Champagne ....A similar argument transpired between Hungary and Slovakia over Tokay/Tokaj
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 7, 2007
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            Sounds like the age-old argument over the sparkling wine called
            "Champagne"....A similar argument transpired between Hungary and
            Slovakia over Tokay/Tokaj wine. Italy produces wine from Tokay grapes
            and they are grown in California as well but I'm not sure they got into
            the fray. Another such debate, though internal to one country was the
            famous dispute regarding Sacher Torte in Vienna. It was first produced
            when a young apprentice pastry chef named Sacher invented it for a
            special royal occasion while working for the Demel cake and coffee house
            in Vienna. He later left Demel and started his own business, the Hotel
            Sacher, and began producing the cake there. Since Demel was still
            producing the cake a dispute arose over who was producing the "Original
            Sacher Torte" and the case went before a judge. He is said to have been
            really perplexed and finally decreed that Demel could produce the
            "Authentic Sacher Torte" and the Sacher Hotel could produce the
            "Original Sacher Torte".

            Paul in Bratislava
            Homebase in Carlisle, PA
          • Martin Votruba
            ... I d think it s more likely that they were yawning, Ron. They ve been handling similar disputes for years (the feta cheese dispute has dragged for two
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 17, 2007
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              > The European commissioners must have had a tough time
              > keeping straight faces when they heard the arguments for
              > exclusive rights to this cheese!

              I'd think it's more likely that they were yawning, Ron. They've been
              handling similar disputes for years (the feta cheese dispute has
              dragged for two decades) and many more are coming up. And that they
              were happy. They'd be out of their extremely well paid jobs otherwise
              (the EU salaries are incomparably higher than the government salaries
              in D.C.).

              This Slovak--Polish dispute has already been resolved, the way that I
              thought was obvious from the start: surprise, surprise, the Poles have
              the exclusive right to the Polish name _oscypek_ and the Slovaks to
              the Slovak name _os~tiepok_, and what each country sells under the
              name it owns the right to is up to each country's internal standards.

              Why on earth was there even a dispute? There was no single name that
              producers and countries spar about, like rum, feta, vodka, gorgonzola.

              That needed a year of negotiations, taxpayer-funded compensation for
              the diplomats, bureaucrats in Brussels, lawyers, interpreters,
              experts, translators, secretaries, travel, hotels, per diems...


              Martin

              votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
            • Martin Votruba
              After Slovakia and Poland settled their ostiepok/oscypek controversy, a new Central-European storm over rights to food labels is gathering around Slovakia,
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 16, 2007
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                After Slovakia and Poland settled their ostiepok/oscypek controversy,
                a new Central-European storm over rights to food labels is gathering
                around Slovakia, this time concerning salami and sausages. Bratislava
                applied for the registration of six types of salami, a type of
                frankfurters, of klobasa, and of sausage (s~peka'c~ik). Warsaw wants
                to register two similar types of salami. Prague is planning to
                contest Warsaw's two applications, and Bratislava's application for
                the right to all of those meat products.

                The European Union registers traditional food products from many of
                its members, which then translates to a status comparable to a
                nationally-held trademark.


                Martin
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