Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Mike Strank

Expand Messages
  • Martin Votruba
    ... It isn t, Colin. I really wonder about that. Thanks for your contribution. Martin votruba at pitt dot edu
    Message 1 of 15 , Oct 10, 2006
      > I take it that your question at the end is rhetorical.

      It isn't, Colin. I really wonder about that. Thanks for your
      contribution.


      Martin

      votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
    • Bruce L. Bauer
      Martin A minor correction. Mike s birth was recorded in the civil village records. (The LDS church birth records for Jarabina end in 1908). I have a copy of
      Message 2 of 15 , Oct 10, 2006
        Martin

        A minor correction. Mike's birth was recorded in the civil village
        records. (The LDS church birth records for Jarabina end in 1908). I
        have a copy of his birth certificate. The original is with his sister.

        Bruce

        At 07:45 PM 10/10/2006, you wrote:
        > > I have validated all this with the Church records
        >
        >Thank you very much, Bruce. I didn't even imagine I could get such
        >perfect confirmation. I'm truly grateful.
      • vchromoho
        ... percentage of ... would, ... their ... if ... their ... OK, I m home and have access to them now. (For the record, I m referring to Ladislav A. Potemra,
        Message 3 of 15 , Oct 10, 2006
          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > > How many Slovaks were living in Jarabina in 1919? OK,
          > > for argument's sake let's make it 1921
          >
          > I agree completely, Rich. I wondered whether you might have them.
          > Even if the percentage were tilted towards the Slovaks in 1921, I'd
          > still think it prudent to check the 1931 census. If the
          percentage of
          > the Rusyns were significantly higher in 1931 than in 1921, it
          would,
          > of course, mean that the people had been there all along and only
          > declared Slovak ethnicity in 1921 due to a variety of possible
          > circumstances. And even if the majority declared Slovak ethnicity
          > both in 1921 and 1931, it would still be at least possible that
          their
          > dominant linguistic and cultural heritage may have been Rusyn but a
          > readiness to claim it in the census wasn't there.
          >
          > A motive for the inhabitants of north-west Spis to call themselves
          > Slovaks regardless of their ethnic heritage in 1921 would have been
          > the recent Polish-Czechoslovak border war. Some may have done so
          if
          > they believed that declaring Slovak identity would help them and
          their
          > village to be part of Czechoslovakia rather than Poland.
          >
          >
          > Martin

          OK, I'm home and have access to them now. (For the record, I'm
          referring to Ladislav A. Potemra, "Ruthenians in Slovakia and the
          Greek Catholic Diocese of Presov", Slovak Studies I, Rome: Slovak
          Institute, 1961.)

          According to the 1921 Czechoslovak census, in Jarabina (pop. 1153)
          there were:

          84 Slovaks;
          1025 Rusyns;
          1 Hungarian;
          43 foreigners [of unstated ethnonational affiliation/background].

          By religion there were:

          75 Roman Catholics;
          1076 Greek Catholics;
          2 Protestants.

          So there were Slovaks in Jarabina, but evidently they were almost
          all Roman Catholics.

          The Strenks and the Grofiks, if church membership in the U.S. is any
          indication, were Greek Catholics. (There were other Strenks and
          other Grofiks just in Conemaugh who were members of the local Greek
          Catholic parish, not to mention others in nearby Johnstown and in
          New York City who were likewise Greek Catholics, or later, Orthodox.)

          So how likely is it that Vasil Strenk and Marta Grofikova Strenkova
          (Michael's parents) were Slovaks?
        • Martin Votruba
          ... Thank you for the evidence, Rich. When we re at it, I recall a mention that one of Robert Urich s parents was Rusyn and the other one Slovak. Do you know
          Message 4 of 15 , Oct 11, 2006
            > So how likely is it that Vasil Strenk and Marta Grofikova Strenkova
            > (Michael's parents) were Slovaks?

            Thank you for the evidence, Rich. When we're at it, I recall a
            mention that one of Robert Urich's parents was Rusyn and the other one
            Slovak. Do you know that that was the case and if so, do you know
            which one was which?


            Martin

            votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
          • vchromoho
            ... Strenkova ... one ... You re welcome, Martin, but the Slovak American organizations still strenuously insist that Mike Strank was a Slovak American and
            Message 5 of 15 , Oct 11, 2006
              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > > So how likely is it that Vasil Strenk and Marta Grofikova
              Strenkova
              > > (Michael's parents) were Slovaks?
              >
              > Thank you for the evidence, Rich. When we're at it, I recall a
              > mention that one of Robert Urich's parents was Rusyn and the other
              one
              > Slovak. Do you know that that was the case and if so, do you know
              > which one was which?
              >
              >
              > Martin
              >
              > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu

              You're welcome, Martin, but the Slovak American organizations still
              strenuously insist that Mike Strank was a Slovak American and that
              he was NOT Rusyn! So I don't think this settles anything for them.

              Robert Urich's father was Rusyn. Original surname: Juric~, village
              of origin was Venecia, now part of Lukov, Bardejov district.
            • Vladimir Bohinc
              I did a thorough genealogical research of Mike Strank. Was in Jarabina several times. At one occasion I told one Strenk relative: So you now have a very
              Message 6 of 15 , Oct 13, 2006
                I did a thorough genealogical research of Mike Strank. Was in Jarabina several times. At one occasion I told one Strenk relative: "So you now have a very famous Slovak in your village."
                "No!, he was Rusyn, not Slovak!" I was corrected immediately and vigorously.
                Both families were of Rusyn ethnicity.
                Jarabina still have a welcome sign in the road in rusyn language. It is a Rusyn village. Most of the "Slovaks"there are actually Roma.
                Vladimir


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: vchromoho
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, October 10, 2006 5:37 PM
                Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Mike Strank


                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > A movie to be released Oct. 20 features the character of the
                > Slovak-American (Rusyn?) soldier represented in the Iwo Jima
                memorial
                > based on a WW II photograph.

                This much we know for sure:
                Michael Strank (Michal Strenk) was born in Jarabina in 1919.

                Hypothesis:

                Michael Strank (Michal Strenk) was a Slovak-American. (true or false?)

                If true, this would imply that:
                The Strenk and Grofik families were Slovak. (true or false?)

                If true, this would imply that:
                There were Slovaks living in Jarabina in 1919. (true or false?)

                How many Slovaks were living in Jarabina in 1919? OK, for argument's
                sake let's make it 1921, when there was a Czechoslovak census.
                Anyone have that data?





                __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.1801 (20061012) __________

                Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
                http://www.eset.sk


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Vladimir Bohinc
                He was american soldier , say the Americans. He was Slovak , says the Slovak history. He was Rusyn say his relatives. All true and all are proud of him.
                Message 7 of 15 , Oct 13, 2006
                  "He was american soldier", say the Americans.
                  "He was Slovak", says the Slovak history.
                  "He was Rusyn" say his relatives.
                  All true and all are proud of him. Were he a crook, nobody would want him as his own.
                  Vladimir

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Martin Votruba
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, October 10, 2006 9:18 AM
                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Mike Strank


                  A movie to be released Oct. 20 features the character of the
                  Slovak-American (Rusyn?) soldier represented in the Iwo Jima memorial
                  based on a WW II photograph. Strank's statue is the one with the sun
                  on his knee here:

                  http://tinyurl.com/e8beg

                  The movie, directed by Clint Eastwood, is based on the like-named book
                  Flags of Our Fathers. Strank is played by Barry Pepper:

                  http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001608

                  I wonder whether someone with access to the respective databases, or
                  other reliable information could confirm Strank's place of birth?

                  The info from the U.S. Marine Corps lists him as born Nov. 10, 1919,
                  in Conemaugh, PA. That should be reliable. His parents' names are
                  listed on this unofficial webpage:

                  http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/michaels.htm

                  Strank's DOB as given to the Marines is also on his tombstone at
                  Arlington (he died in battle about a month after the photo was taken,
                  still in the Pacific):

                  http://www.iwo.com/images/IwotombsSmall.gif

                  However, the internet is full of comments saying he was born in
                  Jarabina, Slovakia/Czechoslovakia, and immigrated with his parents as
                  a child. The same claim has cropped up in the Slovak media. Should
                  he have been born in Jarabina (I haven't seen any evidence of that),
                  could there have been a reason why he might have thought it "better"
                  for him to misstate his place (and possibly date) of birth as being in
                  the US when he enlisted?

                  Thanks for any suggestions.

                  Martin

                  votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu





                  __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.1801 (20061012) __________

                  Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
                  http://www.eset.sk


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Bruce L. Bauer
                  Hello Vladimir All true. Although, Mike would have been very, very uncomfortable being very famous, as were the rest of the flag raisers with the possible
                  Message 8 of 15 , Oct 13, 2006
                    Hello Vladimir

                    All true. Although, Mike would have been very, very uncomfortable
                    being very famous, as were the rest of the flag raisers with the
                    possible exception of Rene.

                    The family has seen the movie and it is a powerful movie and we feel
                    that Eastwood had done a great job of capturing the essence of the
                    book. We, of course, noted some differences but that is to be
                    expected given how well we know the history.

                    Bruce

                    At 02:04 AM 10/13/2006, you wrote:
                    >I did a thorough genealogical research of Mike Strank. Was in
                    >Jarabina several times. At one occasion I told one Strenk relative:
                    >"So you now have a very famous Slovak in your village."
                    >"No!, he was Rusyn, not Slovak!" I was corrected immediately and vigorously.
                    >Both families were of Rusyn ethnicity.
                    >Jarabina still have a welcome sign in the road in rusyn language. It
                    >is a Rusyn village. Most of the "Slovaks"there are actually Roma.
                    >Vladimir
                    >
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: vchromoho
                    > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Tuesday, October 10, 2006 5:37 PM
                    > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Mike Strank
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > A movie to be released Oct. 20 features the character of the
                    > > Slovak-American (Rusyn?) soldier represented in the Iwo Jima
                    > memorial
                    > > based on a WW II photograph.
                    >
                    > This much we know for sure:
                    > Michael Strank (Michal Strenk) was born in Jarabina in 1919.
                    >
                    > Hypothesis:
                    >
                    > Michael Strank (Michal Strenk) was a Slovak-American. (true or false?)
                    >
                    > If true, this would imply that:
                    > The Strenk and Grofik families were Slovak. (true or false?)
                    >
                    > If true, this would imply that:
                    > There were Slovaks living in Jarabina in 1919. (true or false?)
                    >
                    > How many Slovaks were living in Jarabina in 1919? OK, for argument's
                    > sake let's make it 1921, when there was a Czechoslovak census.
                    > Anyone have that data?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.1801 (20061012) __________
                    >
                    > Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
                    > http://www.eset.sk
                    >
                    >
                    >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Slovak American
                    Well put, Vladimir! Patrick http://slovakamerican.blogspot.com/ Vladimir Bohinc wrote: He was american soldier , say the Americans. He
                    Message 9 of 15 , Oct 13, 2006
                      Well put, Vladimir!

                      Patrick
                      http://slovakamerican.blogspot.com/

                      Vladimir Bohinc <konekta@...> wrote:
                      "He was american soldier", say the Americans.
                      "He was Slovak", says the Slovak history.
                      "He was Rusyn" say his relatives.
                      All true and all are proud of him. Were he a crook, nobody would want him as his own.
                      Vladimir

                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Martin Votruba
                      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, October 10, 2006 9:18 AM
                      Subject: [Slovak-World] Mike Strank

                      A movie to be released Oct. 20 features the character of the
                      Slovak-American (Rusyn?) soldier represented in the Iwo Jima memorial
                      based on a WW II photograph. Strank's statue is the one with the sun
                      on his knee here:

                      http://tinyurl.com/e8beg

                      The movie, directed by Clint Eastwood, is based on the like-named book
                      Flags of Our Fathers. Strank is played by Barry Pepper:

                      http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001608

                      I wonder whether someone with access to the respective databases, or
                      other reliable information could confirm Strank's place of birth?

                      The info from the U.S. Marine Corps lists him as born Nov. 10, 1919,
                      in Conemaugh, PA. That should be reliable. His parents' names are
                      listed on this unofficial webpage:

                      http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/michaels.htm

                      Strank's DOB as given to the Marines is also on his tombstone at
                      Arlington (he died in battle about a month after the photo was taken,
                      still in the Pacific):

                      http://www.iwo.com/images/IwotombsSmall.gif

                      However, the internet is full of comments saying he was born in
                      Jarabina, Slovakia/Czechoslovakia, and immigrated with his parents as
                      a child. The same claim has cropped up in the Slovak media. Should
                      he have been born in Jarabina (I haven't seen any evidence of that),
                      could there have been a reason why he might have thought it "better"
                      for him to misstate his place (and possibly date) of birth as being in
                      the US when he enlisted?

                      Thanks for any suggestions.

                      Martin

                      votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu

                      __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.1801 (20061012) __________

                      Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
                      http://www.eset.sk

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                      ---------------------------------
                      Stay in the know. Pulse on the new Yahoo.com. Check it out.

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • rabbit
                      The 1930 US Census for Pennsylvania has a Michael Strank as a son of Wasil (ca 1898) and Martha (ca 1901) Strank. It shows him born in Czechoslovakia and
                      Message 10 of 15 , Oct 13, 2006
                        The 1930 US Census for Pennsylvania has a Michael Strank as a son of Wasil (ca 1898) and Martha (ca 1901) Strank. It shows him born in Czechoslovakia and living in Franklin, Cambria Co, PA. The brother born 3 years later is indicated to have been born in PA.

                        This indicates that immigration occurred between 1919 and 1922. The 1930 Census says that his father immigrated in 1921 and he and his mother immigrated in 1922.

                        I did not find him or his parents in a quick look at Ellis Island. Perhaps someone with more time will have more success.

                        Wasel registered for the WWII draft in Cambria Co in 1942 indicating that he was from Hungary and was living in (Franklin) Conemaugh, PA. He appears to have signed his given name with a "V" spelling.

                        I did not find Michael under Strank or the more common Strunk names. This suggests that he may have volunteered.

                        Jim Crownover-
                        CA

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.