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geneology

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  • Kelly L. Zavotka
    Hello, I ve been lurking here for quite a while, enjoying the discussions and photographs. I have been silent because I have little to contribute, only
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 4, 2006
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      Hello,
      I've been lurking here for quite a while, enjoying the discussions and photographs. I have been silent because I have little to contribute, only questions. I didn't know if it would be rude to post a specifically personal geneoloical query, but here goes:
      My last name is Zavotka (Zavodka on my great grandfather's passport.) I became interested in geneology because I realized that my immediate family were the only people I'd ever heard of with that surname. I found mention of one other zavodka who passed through Ellis Island. Does anyone recognzie this surname as a Slovak last name, or has anyone ever heard of this surname in Slovakia? Did slovak surnames change (in Slovakia) after independence from Hungary?
      Thank you,
      Kelly Zavotka

      ________________________________

      From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com on behalf of genealogyslovakia
      Sent: Sun 9/3/2006 4:59 PM
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Cemeteries and genealogy searching



      I added two links to this Yahoo group
      Thea are about my activities: Cemeteries and genealogy searching
      http://www.cisarik.com <http://www.cisarik.com>
    • Kelly L. Zavotka
      Hi, I needed to add on to this query...I ve noticed that the word zavodka appears in russian, czech, belorussian, austrian and hungarian websites. Does
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 4, 2006
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        Hi,
        I needed to add on to this query...I've noticed that the word "zavodka" appears in russian, czech, belorussian, austrian and hungarian websites. Does anyone know what language "zavodka" is, and what it means? I've not been able to translate it. Thanks,
        Kelly

        ________________________________

        From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Kelly L. Zavotka
        Sent: Mon 9/4/2006 7:58 PM
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com; Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Slovak-World] geneology



        Hello,
        I've been lurking here for quite a while, enjoying the discussions and photographs. I have been silent because I have little to contribute, only questions. I didn't know if it would be rude to post a specifically personal geneoloical query, but here goes:
        My last name Zavotka (Zavodka on my great grandfather's passport.) I became interested in geneology because I realized that my immediate family were the only people I'd ever heard of with that surname. I found mention of one other zavodka who passed through Ellis Island. Does anyone recognzie this surname as a Slovak last name, or has anyone ever heard of this surname in Slovakia? Did slovak surnames change (in Slovakia) after independence from Hungary?
        Thank you,
        Kelly Zavotka

        ________________________________

        From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com> on behalf of genealogyslovakia
        Sent: Sun 9/3/2006 4:59 PM
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Cemeteries and genealogy searching

        I added two links to this Yahoo group
        Thea are about my activities: Cemeteries and genealogy searching
        http://www.cisarik.com <http://www.cisarik.com> <http://www.cisarik.com <http://www.cisarik.com> >
      • Martin Votruba
        ... Place names with the root zavad- (zavod- can be a version of the same root) occur in several Slavic countries. As many as 5 localities in Slovakia are
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 5, 2006
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          > what language "zavodka" is

          Place names with the root zavad- (zavod- can be a version of the same
          root) occur in several Slavic countries. As many as 5 localities in
          Slovakia are called _Zavadka_, there are several in Poland, at least
          one in Subcarpathian/Transcarpathian Rus in Ukraine.

          Family names with the root zavad-/zavod- (some of them probably
          derived from the place names) occur in Slovakia and elsewhere, so it's
          difficult to pinpoint it to just one language. The Slovak telephone
          directory shows neither Zavadka nor Zavodka as family names but the
          directory comes up with several hundred people whose names contain the
          root zavod- or zavad-. For instance (feminine--masculine versions)
          Zavodska--Zavodsky, Zavadska--Zavadsky are quite common.


          Martin

          votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
        • Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)
          It looks like it could come from the roots za (beyond, behind) and voda (water), so it would carry the meaning of someone who came from across a river, or who
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 6, 2006
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            It looks like it could come from the roots za (beyond, behind) and
            voda (water), so it would carry the meaning of someone who came from
            across a river, or who lived on the other side of a brook or pond,
            something like that. Of course, surname origins are lost in the mists
            of time, so in most cases there's no way of knowing for sure how a
            surname developed for a specific family.

            Joe


            -----Original Message-----
            From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Kelly L. Zavotka
            Sent: Monday, September 04, 2006 8:39 PM
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com; Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com;
            Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] geneology


            Hi,
            I needed to add on to this query...I've noticed that the word
            "zavodka" appears in russian, czech, belorussian, austrian and
            hungarian websites. Does anyone know what language "zavodka" is, and
            what it means? I've not been able to translate it. Thanks,
            Kelly
          • Martin Votruba
            ... It might appear so (just as, e.g., the place names that include Plavecky might appear to be from swimming , or Zahradnik might appear to mean from behind
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 6, 2006
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              > voda (water)

              It might appear so (just as, e.g., the place names that include
              Plavecky might appear to be from "swimming", or Zahradnik might appear
              to mean "from behind the castle"), but the root in these names is
              "lead" (vodit, viest, zavadzat). Zavod- (-nik, -sky, -c~i, etc.) were
              names of occupations, a "guide/leader" who led groups of people to/at
              work (typically in the open: forests, fields), in armed conflicts, or
              someone who guided beasts of burden, horses in the army...


              Martin

              votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
            • Kelly L. Zavotka
              Thanks for the insight, Martin and Joe. This is very interesting. Kelly ________________________________ From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 6, 2006
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                Thanks for the insight, Martin and Joe. This is very interesting.
                Kelly

                ________________________________

                From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]
                On Behalf Of Martin Votruba
                Sent: Wednesday, September 06, 2006 11:41 AM
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: geneology

                > voda (water)

                It might appear so (just as, e.g., the place names that include
                Plavecky might appear to be from "swimming", or Zahradnik might appear
                to mean "from behind the castle"), but the root in these names is
                "lead" (vodit, viest, zavadzat). Zavod- (-nik, -sky, -c~i, etc.) were
                names of occupations, a "guide/leader" who led groups of people to/at
                work (typically in the open: forests, fields), in armed conflicts, or
                someone who guided beasts of burden, horses in the army...

                Martin

                votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu



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