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Slovak-Hungarian tensions

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  • David
    August 31, 2006 - Slovak-Hungarian tensions mounting TWO more ethnic Hungarians were beaten up in Slovakia over the weekend. In one case, the female victim
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 31, 2006
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      August 31, 2006 -

      Slovak-Hungarian tensions mounting

      TWO more ethnic Hungarians were beaten up in
      Slovakia over the weekend. In one case, the
      female victim then had anti-Hungarian statements
      daubed on her shirt, MTI reported.

      The 23-year-old woman was attacked in an
      underpass in Nyitra on Friday (Aug 25) by two
      Slovak youngsters when she was talking on the phone in Hungarian.

      After having kicked her several times, the
      suspects wrote "Hungarians get lost, go to the
      other side of the Danube!" and "Death to all parasites!"

      The girl was taken to a hospital in Nyitra with internal bleeding.

      According to reports, police superintendent Ján
      Packa, said he will do anything to find the suspects.

      Béla Bugár, head of the Hungarian coalition party
      had contacted the Slovak police and the Interior
      Ministry, asking for such reassurances, shortly after the incident.

      The second incident took place the following day,
      on Saturday (Aug 26), when a 19-year-old
      Hungarian man was attacked in Diószeg.

      According to the injured man, before being hit,
      the two Slovak suspects, who denied attacking the
      Hungarian because of ethnic reasons, asked him
      whether he knew a Jan Slota and where he lived.

      As previously reported in The Budapest Sun,
      (Slovak teenagers burn flag, Aug 10, Continuing
      Slovak hate, Aug 17), an increasing number of
      anti-Hungarian actions have taken place in
      Slovakia and tensions have risen since Jan Slota,
      a far right member of Slovakia's coalition
      government, started making remarks against the
      ethnic-Hungarian minority in his country.

      According to Bugár, the rise in tension is allied
      to the fact that Slota has found an ally in
      Robert Fico, the recently elected Prime Minister
      of Slovakia, who is willing to cooperate with the rightwing party.

      He therefore asked Fico to distance himself from
      the anti-Hungarian statements as soon as
      possible, as these emotions have taken an "uncontrollable" turn.

      Hungary's Minister of Foreign Affairs, Kinga
      Göncz, told reporters the government deemed "all
      forms of xenophobia unacceptable," at the weekly
      press conference following the cabinet session on Wednesday (Aug 23).

      The Minister was reacting to anti-Slovak banners
      displayed among the stands at first and second
      division football matches held in Hungary over
      that weekend. (more appeared this weekend). Göncz
      stressed that the government rejected "all
      statements which, in any way, may evoke hatred
      against any people, nation or group, with special
      regard to the fact, that such extreme sentiments
      are likely to provoke similar reactions." Göncz
      added that the neighboring countries "need peace,
      progress and the promotion of growth via mutual
      assistance." Due to the repeated anti-Hungarian
      incidents in Slovakia, Göncz has summoned
      Slovakia's charge d'affaires in Budapest by
      saying, "Slovakia should find a way to prevent
      further acts of ethnic-based violence," state news agency MTI reported.

      Last Saturday, three Slovakian youngsters were
      arrested after holding a large flag during a
      football match in Besztercebánya saying "Death to
      Hungarians" and "Felvidék, endurance!"

      Speaking at a news conference on Saturday (Aug
      26), Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsány said, "It is
      impossible to ignore the fact that anti-Hungarian
      and, in some places, far more extensive
      manifestations of xenophobia have been escalating."

      The policy of silence has to come to a halt, he added.

      However, his Slovakian counterpart, Fico, said
      there is no need to intervene, as, according to
      him, the Hungarian coalition party foments the ethnic tensions.

      "What happened in Nyitra, can happen anywhere else in the world," he added.

      His Czech counterpart, Jiri Paroubek, said he
      agreed with the Slovak Prime Minister and
      suggested that Fico should not respond to the
      "verbal fireworks" between Hungary and Slovakia.



      o
    • Martin Votruba
      Here s today s item (Thursday). Let me add that while Slovakia arrested those who displayed the slogans at a soccer game (see the last para in the report
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 31, 2006
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        Here's today's item (Thursday). Let me add that while Slovakia
        arrested those who displayed the slogans at a soccer game (see the
        last para in the report below), Hungary did nothing about similar
        slogans at a soccer game in Hungary a couple of weeks back -- the
        slogans insisted that the Slovaks would always remain the Hungarians'
        slaves, called for a SK politician's death, etc. (I posted links to
        them then). Budapest said that it was free speech.


        Martin

        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu

        x x x

        Bratislava, Agence France Presse, 8/31 -- Slovakia's six parliamentary
        political parties, including the far-right Slovak National Party,
        agreed a declaration Thursday condemning intolerance following a spate
        of incidents targeting the country's Hungarian minority.

        "Representatives of all the parliamentary political parties condemned
        all forms of intolerance and extremism," read the joint declaration,
        presented to the press by Hungarian Coalition Party vice-president,
        Pal Csaky.

        His party draws most of its support from Slovakia's Hungarian
        minority, which comprises 10 percent of the population of the Central
        European country.

        Slovak parties estimated that "inter-ethnic coexistence is currently
        in a worrying state," Csaky added.

        Party leaders however rejected the Coalition Party's initial demand
        for a more strongly-worded condemnation of the "brutal physical
        attacks" against Hungarians, opting instead for a shorter, less
        specific statement without clear reference to the Hungarian minority.

        Tension has mounted between Slovakia and Hungary since the far-right
        xenophobic Slovak National Party became a member of the left-dominated
        coalition government of Prime Minister Robert Fico in June.

        On August 25 a Hungarian student was attacked in the western city of
        Nitra by two men who heard her speaking Hungarian. They wrote the
        message "Hungarians - get back to the other side of the Danube," with
        a felt tip pen on her T-shirt.

        The river Danube serves as a natural frontier along part of the border
        between Slovakia and Hungary.

        A day later, three Slovak youths were arrested after unfolding a
        banner calling for "Death to Hungarians" at a football match in the
        centre of the country.
      • KD7EER
        Nothing to be proud about but maybe something to do with the centuries of Magyar oppression. I am not anti-magyar but its history and it can t be changed.
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 1 9:34 AM
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          Nothing to be proud about but maybe something to do with the centuries of Magyar oppression. I am not "anti-magyar" but its history and it can't be changed. My grandparents were Slovaks from Duvrava/Velki Saris/Presov who were Slovaks but in the US called themselves Austrians or Hungarians and went to Hungarian Catholic churches for whatever reason in NYC.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • andreialexiev
          There is no excuse for this kind of behaiviour.Those two young people were not responsible for Hungarian policy over the centuries.I don t like the way the
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 1 2:17 PM
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            There is no excuse for this kind of behaiviour.Those two young
            people were not responsible for Hungarian policy over the
            centuries.I don't like the way the Poles treated my Ukrainian
            ancestors, but I don't take it out on the modern-day Poles.I
            remember walking through Polish stores in the detroit area with my
            late wife, dressed as an Orthodox priest, and getting subtle and not
            so subtle hate stares.Then my wife would speak in her Lemko dialect
            and the Poles would realise that she wasn't a "real" russian or
            Ukraiunian, then they at least were friendly to her.Incidently, i
            went to the Slovak festival at Sts. Cyril & Methodius church in
            Sterling Heights,Michigan and got the exact opposite reception.You
            would have thought I was a visiting cardinal! and that was BEFORE I
            even opened my mouth to speak in Slovak! Fr. Andrei--- In Slovak-
            World@yahoogroups.com, David <humblebe@...> wrote:
            >
            > August 31, 2006 -
            >
            > Slovak-Hungarian tensions mounting
            >
            > TWO more ethnic Hungarians were beaten up in
            > Slovakia over the weekend. In one case, the
            > female victim then had anti-Hungarian statements
            > daubed on her shirt, MTI reported.
            >
            > The 23-year-old woman was attacked in an
            > underpass in Nyitra on Friday (Aug 25) by two
            > Slovak youngsters when she was talking on the phone in Hungarian.
            >
            > After having kicked her several times, the
            > suspects wrote "Hungarians get lost, go to the
            > other side of the Danube!" and "Death to all parasites!"
            >
            > The girl was taken to a hospital in Nyitra with internal bleeding.
            >
            > According to reports, police superintendent Ján
            > Packa, said he will do anything to find the suspects.
            >
            > Béla Bugár, head of the Hungarian coalition party
            > had contacted the Slovak police and the Interior
            > Ministry, asking for such reassurances, shortly after the incident.
            >
            > The second incident took place the following day,
            > on Saturday (Aug 26), when a 19-year-old
            > Hungarian man was attacked in Diószeg.
            >
            > According to the injured man, before being hit,
            > the two Slovak suspects, who denied attacking the
            > Hungarian because of ethnic reasons, asked him
            > whether he knew a Jan Slota and where he lived.
            >
            > As previously reported in The Budapest Sun,
            > (Slovak teenagers burn flag, Aug 10, Continuing
            > Slovak hate, Aug 17), an increasing number of
            > anti-Hungarian actions have taken place in
            > Slovakia and tensions have risen since Jan Slota,
            > a far right member of Slovakia's coalition
            > government, started making remarks against the
            > ethnic-Hungarian minority in his country.
            >
            > According to Bugár, the rise in tension is allied
            > to the fact that Slota has found an ally in
            > Robert Fico, the recently elected Prime Minister
            > of Slovakia, who is willing to cooperate with the rightwing party.
            >
            > He therefore asked Fico to distance himself from
            > the anti-Hungarian statements as soon as
            > possible, as these emotions have taken an "uncontrollable" turn.
            >
            > Hungary's Minister of Foreign Affairs, Kinga
            > Göncz, told reporters the government deemed "all
            > forms of xenophobia unacceptable," at the weekly
            > press conference following the cabinet session on Wednesday (Aug
            23).
            >
            > The Minister was reacting to anti-Slovak banners
            > displayed among the stands at first and second
            > division football matches held in Hungary over
            > that weekend. (more appeared this weekend). Göncz
            > stressed that the government rejected "all
            > statements which, in any way, may evoke hatred
            > against any people, nation or group, with special
            > regard to the fact, that such extreme sentiments
            > are likely to provoke similar reactions." Göncz
            > added that the neighboring countries "need peace,
            > progress and the promotion of growth via mutual
            > assistance." Due to the repeated anti-Hungarian
            > incidents in Slovakia, Göncz has summoned
            > Slovakia's charge d'affaires in Budapest by
            > saying, "Slovakia should find a way to prevent
            > further acts of ethnic-based violence," state news agency MTI
            reported.
            >
            > Last Saturday, three Slovakian youngsters were
            > arrested after holding a large flag during a
            > football match in Besztercebánya saying "Death to
            > Hungarians" and "Felvidék, endurance!"
            >
            > Speaking at a news conference on Saturday (Aug
            > 26), Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsány said, "It is
            > impossible to ignore the fact that anti-Hungarian
            > and, in some places, far more extensive
            > manifestations of xenophobia have been escalating."
            >
            > The policy of silence has to come to a halt, he added.
            >
            > However, his Slovakian counterpart, Fico, said
            > there is no need to intervene, as, according to
            > him, the Hungarian coalition party foments the ethnic tensions.
            >
            > "What happened in Nyitra, can happen anywhere else in the world,"
            he added.
            >
            > His Czech counterpart, Jiri Paroubek, said he
            > agreed with the Slovak Prime Minister and
            > suggested that Fico should not respond to the
            > "verbal fireworks" between Hungary and Slovakia.
            >
            >
            >
            > o
            >
          • amiak27
            Maybe your grandparents had no trouble separating their ethnic identity (Slovak) from their nationality (Hungarian), much as we do the same today in the US.
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 1 2:31 PM
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              Maybe your grandparents had no trouble separating their ethnic
              identity (Slovak) from their nationality (Hungarian), much as we do
              the same today in the US. If it is hard to imagine them being proud
              Hungarians, then try to picture why black Americans are proud of being
              American, despite the discrimination they face every day. I believe
              there is a valid parallel there.

              Ron

              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "KD7EER" <KD7EER@...> wrote:
              >
              My grandparents were Slovaks ... but in the US called themselves
              Austrians or Hungarians and went to Hungarian Catholic churches for
              whatever reason in NYC.
              >
            • Martin Votruba
              ... On Monday (yesterday), the prosecutor dropped the case against the unknown assailants. According to the police the woman made it up. They say that 250
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 12 10:10 AM
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                > The 23-year-old woman was attacked in an underpass in Nyitra
                > on Friday (Aug 25) by two Slovak youngsters
                > when she was talking on the phone in Hungarian.

                On Monday (yesterday), the prosecutor dropped the case against the
                unknown assailants. According to the police the woman made it up.
                They say that 250 policemen were involved in the investigation of the
                alleged attack and the personnel and patrons of 100 restaurants have
                been questioned.

                The main argument for closing the case was that there was no record of
                her making a call on her cellphone at any time during that day. When
                the police pointed it out to her, she said she borrowed someone else's
                phone, but was unable to say whose.

                The police also quoted the doctor's report according to which the
                woman suffered no injuries. The blood on her clothes came from her
                nose. She smeared it over her body and clothes. She told the police
                that she gets a nosebleed whenever she's nervous.

                She had originally said that she remained lying in mud for an hour
                after the attack but the police say that her blouse was clean and that
                expert analysis detected only traces of detergent.

                The police also say that the anti-Hungarian statements written
                according to her by her assailants on her blouse matches her own
                handwriting.

                She also originally told the police that her watch and ID were stolen.
                She later produced an envelope from an unknown sender in which her
                watch and ID were returned. The police say that subsequent genetic
                analysis of the saliva on the stamp has shown that it is her own saliva.

                Apparently, the police have not decided so far whether to bring
                charges against her.


                Let me add a small observation: the news item about the attack that
                Dave posted on August 31 spells the Slovak town of Nitra as _Niytra_,
                which is a Hungarian spelling. That is to say that the news report
                came from Hungary and not from Slovakia where it allegedly happened.

                A Hungarian organization, "64 Counties," whose goal is to restore the
                pre-World War I Kingdom of Hungary, demonstrated outside the Slovak
                Embassy in Budapest and within 2 days of the Hungarian report of the
                alleged attack, and is planning a demonstration in Bratislava this
                coming Saturday. The demonstrators carried placards with, among other
                things, the Hungarian names of Slovakia's regions, and statements
                lamenting the demise of the Kingdom agreed on at Trianon after
                Austria-Hungary was defeated in 1918.


                Martin

                votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
              • andreialexiev
                Thanks for the update,Martin.It looks as if the Magyar irredentists are using some of the same tactics as the Nazis;for example some Nazis harrassed a Czech
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 13 2:00 PM
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                  Thanks for the update,Martin.It looks as if the Magyar irredentists
                  are using some of the same tactics as the Nazis;for example some
                  Nazis harrassed a Czech border guard in 1938 until the man finally
                  slapped one of them in the face.The Nazi headline read,"Savage
                  horsewhipping by bestial Czech." In 1939,Nazis slipped into Polish
                  Army uniforms and across the border into Poland to create
                  incidents.Of course, the Communists used similar tactics, in Tsarist
                  Russia, they would infiltrate patriotic organisations to stir up
                  antisemitic pogroms.Also the brutal war against Finland in 1940, the
                  invasion of Hungary in 1956, and the invasion of Czecho-slovakia in
                  1968 were all depicted as 'aiding" the reprssed workers of said
                  lands>Fr.Andrei--- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba"
                  <votrubam@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > The 23-year-old woman was attacked in an underpass in Nyitra
                  > > on Friday (Aug 25) by two Slovak youngsters
                  > > when she was talking on the phone in Hungarian.
                  >
                  > On Monday (yesterday), the prosecutor dropped the case against the
                  > unknown assailants. According to the police the woman made it up.
                  > They say that 250 policemen were involved in the investigation of
                  the
                  > alleged attack and the personnel and patrons of 100 restaurants
                  have
                  > been questioned.
                  >
                  > The main argument for closing the case was that there was no
                  record of
                  > her making a call on her cellphone at any time during that day.
                  When
                  > the police pointed it out to her, she said she borrowed someone
                  else's
                  > phone, but was unable to say whose.
                  >
                  > The police also quoted the doctor's report according to which the
                  > woman suffered no injuries. The blood on her clothes came from her
                  > nose. She smeared it over her body and clothes. She told the
                  police
                  > that she gets a nosebleed whenever she's nervous.
                  >
                  > She had originally said that she remained lying in mud for an hour
                  > after the attack but the police say that her blouse was clean and
                  that
                  > expert analysis detected only traces of detergent.
                  >
                  > The police also say that the anti-Hungarian statements written
                  > according to her by her assailants on her blouse matches her own
                  > handwriting.
                  >
                  > She also originally told the police that her watch and ID were
                  stolen.
                  > She later produced an envelope from an unknown sender in which her
                  > watch and ID were returned. The police say that subsequent genetic
                  > analysis of the saliva on the stamp has shown that it is her own
                  saliva.
                  >
                  > Apparently, the police have not decided so far whether to bring
                  > charges against her.
                  >
                  >
                  > Let me add a small observation: the news item about the attack that
                  > Dave posted on August 31 spells the Slovak town of Nitra as
                  _Niytra_,
                  > which is a Hungarian spelling. That is to say that the news report
                  > came from Hungary and not from Slovakia where it allegedly
                  happened.
                  >
                  > A Hungarian organization, "64 Counties," whose goal is to restore
                  the
                  > pre-World War I Kingdom of Hungary, demonstrated outside the Slovak
                  > Embassy in Budapest and within 2 days of the Hungarian report of
                  the
                  > alleged attack, and is planning a demonstration in Bratislava this
                  > coming Saturday. The demonstrators carried placards with, among
                  other
                  > things, the Hungarian names of Slovakia's regions, and statements
                  > lamenting the demise of the Kingdom agreed on at Trianon after
                  > Austria-Hungary was defeated in 1918.
                  >
                  >
                  > Martin
                  >
                  > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                  >
                • Matchett
                  I noticed the used book Deliverance of Sister Cecilia is for sale on eBay. I have a worn out copy that I ve read a couple times. She s hunted by the
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 14 5:20 AM
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                    I noticed the used book "Deliverance of Sister Cecilia" is for sale on
                    eBay. I have a worn out copy that I've read a couple times. She's
                    hunted by the authorities and is in hiding for months during the
                    communist era. Julia Matchett Item number: 190030891300.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Martin Votruba
                    ... I wouldn t put it past them, Alexei. If they are, they rely on all those well-meaning, concerned people who rush to spread every item about injustice as
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 14 10:55 AM
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                      > as if the Magyar irredentists are using some of the
                      > same tactics as the Nazis

                      I wouldn't put it past them, Alexei. If they are, they rely on all
                      those well-meaning, concerned people who rush to spread every item
                      about injustice as soon as it flashes across their screens, condemn
                      the -- still merely alleged -- event, and pass it on while being able
                      to supply little or nothing about the report's context and without any
                      interest or ability to follow up and keep bringing new information as
                      the story develops after the initial frenzy.

                      That way the meddlers win twice: the story gets out and spreads wide,
                      plus it is taken for a fact because now it seems to be coming from the
                      presumably credible people, since they are uninvolved but concerned,
                      thus obscuring the story's real source and context that might
                      otherwise give some thoughtful or informed people pause.


                      Martin

                      votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
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