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Slovakia this n that

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  • J. Michutka
    The Uluv (folk) store in Kosice is gone; but there s another store that sells folk art, on a street running parallel (about two blocks away) to Hlavna; address
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 3, 2006
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      The Uluv (folk) store in Kosice is gone; but there's another store that
      sells folk art, on a street running parallel (about two blocks away) to
      Hlavna; address is Hrnciarska 15. They have some traditional folk art, and
      some artisans' modern uses of traditional art forms.

      There's a nice used bookstore, basement level (enter from the street), in
      Kosice, AntiqArt (or AntikArt), Hlavna 12.

      In Bratislava: that wonderful used book store, Antikvariat Steiner (or
      maybe Steiner Antikvariat) is recently gone from the stare mesto. I'm not
      sure from the answer I got, whether the store is totally out of business,
      or moved to someplace with lower rent.

      The street that the main Uluv store is on (in Bratislava), Obchodna Ulica,
      which begins practically right outside Michael's Gate, is being torn up and
      redone; nice new wide sidewalks, trolley tracks being given new base and
      relaid, etc. But it didn't look like there was going to be room left for
      cars (pretty sure I remember that street being open to auto traffic), so I
      suspect it's about to become a new pedestrian zone, and if so, I'm willing
      to bet that the shops are about to go up-scale. Anyone have more solid
      information than my speculations?

      Speaking of that main Uluv store (address is Obchodna 64), behind it in the
      sort-of-courtyard are various Uluv workshops, and the last one on the right
      is another Uluv shop that has lots of stuff for costumes (kroj): fabric
      including linen, wool in various stages of becoming yarn, those ribbons
      that I thought could only be found in Detva, buttons and buckles, lace,
      Uluv published books on various forms of folk art such as wire work, egg
      decoration, corn husk dolls, etc. If you go to that main Uluv store, don't
      miss that little place in the back!

      I am the granddaughter of farmers, and these are the fields we saw
      growing/in bloom at the tail end of June/first half of July:
      *sunflowers in bloom mid-July, only in the SW of Slovakia and in Czech
      Republic and Austria
      *We passed by too quickly to be 100% sure, but I'm *pretty* sure that the
      field of blue flowers was flax in bloom
      *rapeseed--on my last trip my relatives had mentioned a grain that has a
      yellow flower, and I couldn't imagine what it was; well, it was in bloom
      this time, and evidently it is also becoming much more common a crop; very
      pretty; grown for its oil (canola oil) for a petroleum substitute
      *fields of poppies in the Czech Republic; we were told that they won't be
      allowed to grow them commercially after they join the EU; does anyone know
      if this is so?
      *wheat, ripe, already cut in some places, waiting to be cut elsewhere. One
      memorable sight: massive ancient Roman arch in the middle of wheat fields,
      in Carnuntum, Austria
      *potatoes in bloom
      *corn, but I grew up surrounded by corn fields, so nothing special for me
      in that sight, except delight in its green-ness
      *hay being cut, flat land to steep hillsides, huge fields to small patches
      carved out of woods, with scythes and big machines and everything in
      between. I was surprised to see a haywagon drawn by milk cows, didn't know
      that people worked milk cows that way
      *judging from pictures I've seen, one field of plants growing up poles (a
      whole field of poles!) was hops

      Julie Michutka
      jmm@...
    • Helen Fedor
      That shop in Kosice on Hrnciarska carries the work of a blacksmith, who makes traditional and modern items. I got some lovely little fish (wire worked around
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 3, 2006
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        That shop in Kosice on Hrnciarska carries the work of a blacksmith, who makes traditional and modern items. I got some lovely little fish (wire worked around a glass "stone") that you can use as a suncatcher or hang as Christmas tree ornaments. They're great for gifts (the small ones were $3-4).

        Antikvariat Steiner was gone from its location last May (2005) and I couldn't seem to get a straight answer either.

        I think I remember traffic on Obchodna too.

        Canola oil isn't a a petroleum substitute--it's edible. It's one of the healthy cooking oils.

        Helen



        >>> jmm@... 08/03/06 12:17 PM >>>
        The Uluv (folk) store in Kosice is gone; but there's another store that
        sells folk art, on a street running parallel (about two blocks away) to
        Hlavna; address is Hrnciarska 15. They have some traditional folk art, and
        some artisans' modern uses of traditional art forms.

        There's a nice used bookstore, basement level (enter from the street), in
        Kosice, AntiqArt (or AntikArt), Hlavna 12.

        In Bratislava: that wonderful used book store, Antikvariat Steiner (or
        maybe Steiner Antikvariat) is recently gone from the stare mesto. I'm not
        sure from the answer I got, whether the store is totally out of business,
        or moved to someplace with lower rent.

        The street that the main Uluv store is on (in Bratislava), Obchodna Ulica,
        which begins practically right outside Michael's Gate, is being torn up and
        redone; nice new wide sidewalks, trolley tracks being given new base and
        relaid, etc. But it didn't look like there was going to be room left for
        cars (pretty sure I remember that street being open to auto traffic), so I
        suspect it's about to become a new pedestrian zone, and if so, I'm willing
        to bet that the shops are about to go up-scale. Anyone have more solid
        information than my speculations?

        Speaking of that main Uluv store (address is Obchodna 64), behind it in the
        sort-of-courtyard are various Uluv workshops, and the last one on the right
        is another Uluv shop that has lots of stuff for costumes (kroj): fabric
        including linen, wool in various stages of becoming yarn, those ribbons
        that I thought could only be found in Detva, buttons and buckles, lace,
        Uluv published books on various forms of folk art such as wire work, egg
        decoration, corn husk dolls, etc. If you go to that main Uluv store, don't
        miss that little place in the back!

        I am the granddaughter of farmers, and these are the fields we saw
        growing/in bloom at the tail end of June/first half of July:
        *sunflowers in bloom mid-July, only in the SW of Slovakia and in Czech
        Republic and Austria
        *We passed by too quickly to be 100% sure, but I'm *pretty* sure that the
        field of blue flowers was flax in bloom
        *rapeseed--on my last trip my relatives had mentioned a grain that has a
        yellow flower, and I couldn't imagine what it was; well, it was in bloom
        this time, and evidently it is also becoming much more common a crop; very
        pretty; grown for its oil (canola oil) for a petroleum substitute
        *fields of poppies in the Czech Republic; we were told that they won't be
        allowed to grow them commercially after they join the EU; does anyone know
        if this is so?
        *wheat, ripe, already cut in some places, waiting to be cut elsewhere. One
        memorable sight: massive ancient Roman arch in the middle of wheat fields,
        in Carnuntum, Austria
        *potatoes in bloom
        *corn, but I grew up surrounded by corn fields, so nothing special for me
        in that sight, except delight in its green-ness
        *hay being cut, flat land to steep hillsides, huge fields to small patches
        carved out of woods, with scythes and big machines and everything in
        between. I was surprised to see a haywagon drawn by milk cows, didn't know
        that people worked milk cows that way
        *judging from pictures I've seen, one field of plants growing up poles (a
        whole field of poles!) was hops

        Julie Michutka
        jmm@...
      • J. Michutka
        ... Yep, I know, I use it all the time; that and olive oil. But it is also being used as a petroleum substitute, and that s what one of the Slovaks told us it
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 3, 2006
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          >
          >
          >Canola oil isn't a a petroleum substitute--it's edible. It's one of the
          >healthy cooking oils.

          Yep, I know, I use it all the time; that and olive oil. But it is also
          being used as a petroleum substitute, and that's what one of the Slovaks
          told us it was being raised for in Slovakia.

          There are a few businesses here in the Boston area (and a few car owners)
          that have converted their furnaces (or cars) to run on filtered used
          vegetable oil from restaurants.

          Brasilians are using a petroleum substitute made from sugar cane; various
          other crops including corn can also be used, but I think sugar cane is more
          productive. One of the big debates on the petroleum substitute for corn is
          whether it takes as much petroleum to produce it, as it replaces.

          Julie Michutka
          jmm@...
        • J. Michutka
          ... This wording is awkward, is can be taken differently than I meant; of course, I meant one of the big debates on corn as a substitute for petroleum is...
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 3, 2006
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            > One of the big debates on the petroleum substitute for corn is


            This wording is awkward, is can be taken differently than I meant; of
            course, I meant "one of the big debates on corn as a substitute for
            petroleum is..."

            Julie Michutka
            jmm@...
          • Nick Holcz
            ... Probably a diesel substitute called Bio-diesel Nick
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 3, 2006
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              At 01:08 AM 4/08/2006, you wrote:


              > >
              > >
              > >Canola oil isn't a a petroleum substitute--it's edible. It's one of the
              > >healthy cooking oils.

              Probably a diesel substitute called Bio-diesel

              Nick
            • raybravo2000
              Ethanol in Brazil is produced efficiently because it comes from sugar cane. However, corn does not produce as much ethanol and it takes more energy to make it
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 3, 2006
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                Ethanol in Brazil is produced efficiently because it comes from sugar cane. However, corn
                does not produce as much ethanol and it takes more energy to make it than we get from
                it. The only reason we make ethenol is a subsidy. Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) the
                biggest producer would not be able to make money producing ethanol if it weren't for the
                subsidy. However, even if it isn't as efficient it burns cleaner than regular gas.

                Colin

                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "J. Michutka" <jmm@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > >
                > >
                > >Canola oil isn't a a petroleum substitute--it's edible. It's one of the
                > >healthy cooking oils.
                >
                > Yep, I know, I use it all the time; that and olive oil. But it is also
                > being used as a petroleum substitute, and that's what one of the Slovaks
                > told us it was being raised for in Slovakia.
                >
                > There are a few businesses here in the Boston area (and a few car owners)
                > that have converted their furnaces (or cars) to run on filtered used
                > vegetable oil from restaurants.
                >
                > Brasilians are using a petroleum substitute made from sugar cane; various
                > other crops including corn can also be used, but I think sugar cane is more
                > productive. One of the big debates on the petroleum substitute for corn is
                > whether it takes as much petroleum to produce it, as it replaces.
                >
                > Julie Michutka
                > jmm@...
                >
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