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[Slovak-World] Re: my slovak name

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  • Helen Fedor
    The T becomes a C only in front of a soft vowel ( e or i , e.g., tetka = cetka or ticho = cicho) or when the t has a ma:kcen~ [soft sign], such as in verb
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 1, 2006
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      The T becomes a C only in front of a soft vowel ("e" or "i", e.g., tetka = cetka or ticho = cicho) or when the "t" has a ma:kcen~ [soft sign], such as in verb infinitives (e.g., spat' = spac"). The letter D becomes DZ under the same conditions (e.g., dedo =dzedo).

      H



      >>> Andrei424@... 07/31/06 6:53 PM >>>
      -At the risk of sounding like an expert(I'm not Slovak) ,in the East
      Slovak dilects,"t" often becomes "c" as in Polish,i.e."Budem
      spat'"(Iwill be sleeping) in literary Slovak becomes "Budzem spac" in
      East Slovak.Along the Slovak-Polish border, one may hear "l"
      pronounced like a "w" as in Polish.Thus, "Labik", my late wife's rusin
      maiden name is sometimes pronounced "Wabik", some relatives of my wife
      write the name that way.Of course, Ukrainiophiles who insist that
      rusins are really misguided Ukrainians would probably say<"LaBYK"
      accent on the last syllable.-- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen
      Fedor" <hfed@...> wrote:
      >
      > Povina is up in the NW part of Slovakia, but "Fojcik" is what the
      name would be in the eastern dialects.
      >
      > H
      >
      >
      >
      > >>> nv_cracker@... 07/31/06 3:31 PM >>>
      > After researching my maternal side, I found that the correct
      spelling for my mother's father's surname is "Fojtik". For at least
      eighty years it has been spelled as
      > "Foycik" in this country. I also learned that the spelling as
      "Fojtik" is particular to the area of Povina Slovakia. or so I have
      been told. It is apparent as you look at the documents that I have
      found that grandmother knew it should be spelled Fojtik but she never
      corrected it. I know this because she spelled it correctly when she
      applied for a marriage license for her second marriage in early 1930.
      Also it appears correctly spelled on a death certificate for my
      grandfather. I think now it would be a little to late to make a
      correction as there is only one of us left to carry out the family
      name and since we are all older I don't think that will happen. Life
      is strange!
      >
      > Diane
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > See the all-new, redesigned Yahoo.com. Check it out.
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • raybravo2000
      I m no expert either but in Jakubany, which I am told should be considered Eastern Slovak, they say spat with the t sound. Although it might be a soft t ,
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 1, 2006
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        I'm no expert either but in Jakubany, which I am told should be
        considered Eastern Slovak, they say "spat" with the "t" sound.
        Although it might be a soft "t", but not the "c" or "s" sound. Maybe
        that's the Rusyn pronunciation, or maybe they are trying to
        speak "proper" Slovak for my benefit.

        Colin


        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "andreialexiev" <Andrei424@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > -At the risk of sounding like an expert(I'm not Slovak) ,in the
        East
        > Slovak dilects,"t" often becomes "c" as in Polish,i.e."Budem
        > spat'"(Iwill be sleeping) in literary Slovak becomes "Budzem spac"
        in
        > East Slovak.Along the Slovak-Polish border, one may hear "l"
        > pronounced like a "w" as in Polish.Thus, "Labik", my late wife's
        rusin
        > maiden name is sometimes pronounced "Wabik", some relatives of my
        wife
        > write the name that way.Of course, Ukrainiophiles who insist that
        > rusins are really misguided Ukrainians would probably say<"LaBYK"
        > accent on the last syllable.-- In Slovak-
        World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen
        > Fedor" <hfed@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Povina is up in the NW part of Slovakia, but "Fojcik" is what the
        > name would be in the eastern dialects.
        > >
        > > H
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > >>> nv_cracker@ 07/31/06 3:31 PM >>>
        > > After researching my maternal side, I found that the correct
        > spelling for my mother's father's surname is "Fojtik". For at
        least
        > eighty years it has been spelled as
        > > "Foycik" in this country. I also learned that the spelling as
        > "Fojtik" is particular to the area of Povina Slovakia. or so I
        have
        > been told. It is apparent as you look at the documents that I have
        > found that grandmother knew it should be spelled Fojtik but she
        never
        > corrected it. I know this because she spelled it correctly when
        she
        > applied for a marriage license for her second marriage in early
        1930.
        > Also it appears correctly spelled on a death certificate for my
        > grandfather. I think now it would be a little to late to make a
        > correction as there is only one of us left to carry out the family
        > name and since we are all older I don't think that will happen.
        Life
        > is strange!
        > >
        > > Diane
        > >
        > >
        > > ---------------------------------
        > > See the all-new, redesigned Yahoo.com. Check it out.
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
      • andreialexiev
        I,ve heard of American Rusins visiting the old country who claim that the children are/were being taught Czech in the schools.What theycall Czech is
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 1, 2006
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          I,ve heard of American Rusins visiting the old country who claim that
          the children are/were being taught "Czech" in the schools.What
          theycall "Czech" is probably correct literary Slovak which these
          Rusin_Americans wouldn't know because their parents were never taught
          in this language.--- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "raybravo2000"
          <colinvv@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm no expert either but in Jakubany, which I am told should be
          > considered Eastern Slovak, they say "spat" with the "t" sound.
          > Although it might be a soft "t", but not the "c" or "s" sound. Maybe
          > that's the Rusyn pronunciation, or maybe they are trying to
          > speak "proper" Slovak for my benefit.
          >
          > Colin
          >
          >
          > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "andreialexiev" <Andrei424@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > -At the risk of sounding like an expert(I'm not Slovak) ,in the
          > East
          > > Slovak dilects,"t" often becomes "c" as in Polish,i.e."Budem
          > > spat'"(Iwill be sleeping) in literary Slovak becomes "Budzem spac"
          > in
          > > East Slovak.Along the Slovak-Polish border, one may hear "l"
          > > pronounced like a "w" as in Polish.Thus, "Labik", my late wife's
          > rusin
          > > maiden name is sometimes pronounced "Wabik", some relatives of my
          > wife
          > > write the name that way.Of course, Ukrainiophiles who insist that
          > > rusins are really misguided Ukrainians would probably say<"LaBYK"
          > > accent on the last syllable.-- In Slovak-
          > World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen
          > > Fedor" <hfed@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Povina is up in the NW part of Slovakia, but "Fojcik" is what the
          > > name would be in the eastern dialects.
          > > >
          > > > H
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > >>> nv_cracker@ 07/31/06 3:31 PM >>>
          > > > After researching my maternal side, I found that the correct
          > > spelling for my mother's father's surname is "Fojtik". For at
          > least
          > > eighty years it has been spelled as
          > > > "Foycik" in this country. I also learned that the spelling as
          > > "Fojtik" is particular to the area of Povina Slovakia. or so I
          > have
          > > been told. It is apparent as you look at the documents that I have
          > > found that grandmother knew it should be spelled Fojtik but she
          > never
          > > corrected it. I know this because she spelled it correctly when
          > she
          > > applied for a marriage license for her second marriage in early
          > 1930.
          > > Also it appears correctly spelled on a death certificate for my
          > > grandfather. I think now it would be a little to late to make a
          > > correction as there is only one of us left to carry out the family
          > > name and since we are all older I don't think that will happen.
          > Life
          > > is strange!
          > > >
          > > > Diane
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > ---------------------------------
          > > > See the all-new, redesigned Yahoo.com. Check it out.
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > >
          >
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