Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Fw:Reply to [Slovak-World] word for "father"

Expand Messages
  • George Sirko
    The word for Father is Otce but I believe we called our Father something starting with an N . Does anybody know a different word for Father. Help us out.
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 16, 2006
      The word for Father is Otce but I believe we called our Father something starting with an N . Does anybody know a different word for Father. Help us out.
      George


      ----- Forwarded Message ----
      From: Danusha Goska <dgoska@...>
      To: slovak-world@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, July 16, 2006 11:48:41 AM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] word for "father"


      Dear Slovak World members,

      Thanks again for all the posts in response to mine. Very helpful.

      I hope that it is understood that my post was not a criticism of cemetery posts; rather, I was asking, as a newcomer, if it was okay to talk about anything other than cemeteries. I'm glad to read that many feel that other topics are also okay.

      For now, i have a quick question: What did Slovak speakers in your family call their fathers?

      Thanks.


      ------------ --------- --------- ---
      See the all-new, redesigned Yahoo.com. Check it out.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • vchromoho
      ... something starting with an N . Does anybody know a different word for Father. Help us out. ... There is a Rusyn term equivalent to Dad , which is njan o
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 16, 2006
        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, George Sirko <gsirko@...> wrote:
        >
        > The word for Father is Otce but I believe we called our Father
        something starting with an N . Does anybody know a different word for
        Father. Help us out.
        > George

        There is a Rusyn term equivalent to "Dad", which is

        njan'o (phon: NYUN-yoh)

        and its diminutive ("Daddy"),

        njan'ko

        If this is the term you used, maybe you are Rusyn. I've never heard
        of this word in any dialect of Slovak.
      • Martin Votruba
        ... Just came across this looking for something else. It s not as common today, but it does occur in older Slovak literature and even in the grade school
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 30, 2007
          > There is a Rusyn term equivalent to "Dad", which is
          >
          > njan'o (phon: NYUN-yoh)
          >
          > and its diminutive ("Daddy"),
          >
          > njan'ko
          >
          > If this is the term you used, maybe you are Rusyn. I've never heard
          > of this word in any dialect of Slovak.

          Just came across this looking for something else. It's not as common
          today, but it does occur in older Slovak literature and even in the
          grade school primer (probably copied over and over again from who
          knows when). I don't know about all the dialects, but I'd assume that
          it cannot have disappeared completely. It is sometimes used as a
          man's nickname among the Slovaks.

          In a broader picture, it's ancient Indo-European (if not older), not
          even merely Slavic; one of those (now often children's) words created
          by repeating the same syllable, the second one of which was often
          subsequently modified (English: mummy, daddy, baby, yum-yum, the words
          for "defecate/feces," British: geegee). _n~an~a_ is historically
          related to the English _nanny_. I wouldn't be surprised if versions
          of _n~an~a_ could be found, at least regionally, in many if not all
          the Slavic languages, and in many others in Europe.


          Martin

          votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
        • J Michutka
          As long as you re talking about words for daddy , Martin, exactly what grammatical form is otci , which is what I ve heard a (grown) cousin call her father?
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 30, 2007
            As long as you're talking about words for "daddy", Martin, exactly
            what grammatical form is "otci", which is what I've heard a (grown)
            cousin call her father? Not nominative, since that's "otec"; and I'm
            not seeing the vocative case discussed in my textbooks; is it an old
            vocative? A diminutive of some sort? (but my impression of the
            masculine diminutive is that it often ends in -o, eg my little cousin
            Martinko, Rudo from Rudolf, Peto from Peter, the word njan'ko
            mentioned earlier, etc)

            Julie Michutka
            jmm@...


            >> There is a Rusyn term equivalent to "Dad", which is
            >>
            >> njan'o (phon: NYUN-yoh)
            >>
            >> and its diminutive ("Daddy"),
            >>
            >> njan'ko
          • Helen Fedor
            Here s something a tad different. In the Croatian (Slavonia) folk dancing song Pjevano kolo , one of the verses goes Ej, oce nana bogatoga zeta (Ej, mama
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 30, 2007
              Here's something a tad different. In the Croatian (Slavonia) folk dancing song "Pjevano kolo", one of the verses goes "Ej, oce nana bogatoga zeta" (Ej, mama would like a rich son-in-law). I checked the dictionary and it's definitely "mother", taken, it says, from Turkish.

              H




              >>> "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...> 08/30/07 12:45 PM >>>
              > There is a Rusyn term equivalent to "Dad", which is
              >
              > njan'o (phon: NYUN-yoh)
              >
              > and its diminutive ("Daddy"),
              >
              > njan'ko
              >
              > If this is the term you used, maybe you are Rusyn. I've never heard
              > of this word in any dialect of Slovak.

              Just came across this looking for something else. It's not as common
              today, but it does occur in older Slovak literature and even in the
              grade school primer (probably copied over and over again from who
              knows when). I don't know about all the dialects, but I'd assume that
              it cannot have disappeared completely. It is sometimes used as a
              man's nickname among the Slovaks.

              In a broader picture, it's ancient Indo-European (if not older), not
              even merely Slavic; one of those (now often children's) words created
              by repeating the same syllable, the second one of which was often
              subsequently modified (English: mummy, daddy, baby, yum-yum, the words
              for "defecate/feces," British: geegee). _n~an~a_ is historically
              related to the English _nanny_. I wouldn't be surprised if versions
              of _n~an~a_ could be found, at least regionally, in many if not all
              the Slavic languages, and in many others in Europe.


              Martin

              votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
            • Martin Votruba
              ... A) One of the words for father has become _oco_ [otso]. It developed (the nominative was back-formed) from the case forms of _otec_ that lose the -e-
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 30, 2007
                > what grammatical form is "otci", which is what I've heard a (grown)
                > cousin call her father?

                A) One of the words for "father" has become _oco_ [otso]. It
                developed (the nominative was back-formed) from the case forms of
                _otec_ that lose the -e- (otca [otsa], otcovi [otsovi]).

                B) While Slovak does not have the vocative, people often modify words
                when addressing someone. -i is one such common modification,
                especially with women's names: Marti (Marta), Evi (Eva). That's what
                you've heard with _oco_. Another thing that people sometimes do is
                that they use a diminutive of someone's name when addressing her/him,
                while they use the standard version when talking about her/him: "Ahoj,
                Joz~ko!" and "Joz~o pris~iel."


                Martin

                votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
              • Caye Caswick
                Anyone remember Oche Nash? (big smile here) Caye ... ____________________________________________________________________________________ Be a better
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 30, 2007
                  Anyone remember Oche Nash?

                  (big smile here)


                  Caye


                  --- Martin Votruba <votrubam@...> wrote:

                  > > what grammatical form is "otci", which is what
                  > I've heard a (grown)
                  > > cousin call her father?
                  >
                  > A) One of the words for "father" has become _oco_
                  > [otso]. It
                  > developed (the nominative was back-formed) from the
                  > case forms of
                  > _otec_ that lose the -e- (otca [otsa], otcovi
                  > [otsovi]).
                  >
                  > B) While Slovak does not have the vocative, people
                  > often modify words
                  > when addressing someone. -i is one such common
                  > modification,
                  > especially with women's names: Marti (Marta), Evi
                  > (Eva). That's what
                  > you've heard with _oco_. Another thing that people
                  > sometimes do is
                  > that they use a diminutive of someone's name when
                  > addressing her/him,
                  > while they use the standard version when talking
                  > about her/him: "Ahoj,
                  > Joz~ko!" and "Joz~o pris~iel."
                  >
                  >
                  > Martin
                  >
                  > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                  >
                  >
                  >




                  ____________________________________________________________________________________
                  Be a better Globetrotter. Get better travel answers from someone who knows. Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.
                  http://answers.yahoo.com/dir/?link=list&sid=396545469
                • Martin Votruba
                  ... Just like nanny is a woman, not an old man/grandfather. These ancient family/communal/tribal words have changed their meanings a lot in various ways.
                  Message 8 of 11 , Aug 30, 2007
                    > dictionary and it's definitely "mother", taken,
                    > it says, from Turkish.

                    Just like "nanny" is a woman, not an old man/grandfather. These
                    ancient family/communal/tribal words have changed their meanings a lot
                    in various ways. Some scholars assume that a "daughter," for
                    instance, used to mean a "wet nurse" a long time ago, that the word
                    for "father" used to mean a provider, not what it means today, etc.
                    The link between "nanny" and "granddad/old man" would be either
                    "caretaker," or "dopey," or "one that hangs around (the child while
                    others go to collect and hunt)." But early meanings of words that are
                    so old and common are difficult to determine, there are lots of theories.

                    As to a word like that occurring in Turkish, some use such words to
                    argue that they've reconstructed a historical relationship between the
                    Indo-European, Altaic (including Turkish), and other language
                    families. They call that even older language family _Nostratic_.

                    Still, _nana_can be a borrowing in Croatian, or the "native" word
                    could have shifted its meaning under foreign influence, or it could
                    have developed that meaning independently. The same word has occurred
                    with the meaning "father" in Czech, Lusatian, has been used to address
                    either parent in Polish...

                    It cannot be pinned down to one language and meaning as its original
                    source.


                    Martin

                    votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                  • J Michutka
                    Dakujem Vam za informaciu, Martin. It s printed off and will be taped into an appropriate place in one of my Slovak textbooks. I wondered, shortly after
                    Message 9 of 11 , Aug 30, 2007
                      Dakujem Vam za informaciu, Martin. It's printed off and will be
                      taped into an appropriate place in one of my Slovak textbooks.

                      I wondered, shortly after sending off my question, whether I had the
                      spelling right (otci vs. oci); and now I know that, too!

                      Julie Michutka
                      jmm@...


                      On Aug 30, 2007, at 3:04 PM, Martin Votruba wrote:

                      >> what grammatical form is "otci", which is what I've heard a (grown)
                      >> cousin call her father?
                      >
                      > A) One of the words for "father" has become _oco_ [otso]. <snip>
                    • gardnerlyn
                      Greetings! This is my first post-reply in this wonderful group of people. I have been a member for sometime, just listening to people talk about my ancesterial
                      Message 10 of 11 , Sep 1, 2007
                        Greetings! This is my first post-reply in this wonderful group of
                        people. I have been a member for sometime, just listening to people
                        talk about my ancesterial homeland. I am a second generation
                        American. My Grandmother came over with her five year old sister.
                        Just the two of them, my Grandmother was 13. I was never allowed to
                        speak Slovak, Grandma would always say "You speak American!!!"
                        My Dad always called my Grandfather Njan'o. I was nice to finally see
                        the word in print. I have learned a lot from this group and I thank
                        you. I have a silver needle holder that says Uniontown Pa. on it and
                        now I have a connection. Happy Feast Day to you. Linda (Zekany)Zelms


                        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > > There is a Rusyn term equivalent to "Dad", which is
                        > >
                        > > njan'o (phon: NYUN-yoh)
                        > >
                        > > and its diminutive ("Daddy"),
                        > >
                        > > njan'ko
                        > >
                        > > If this is the term you used, maybe you are Rusyn. I've never
                        heard
                        > > of this word in any dialect of Slovak.
                        >
                        > Just came across this looking for something else. It's not as
                        common
                        > today, but it does occur in older Slovak literature and even in the
                        > grade school primer (probably copied over and over again from who
                        > knows when). I don't know about all the dialects, but I'd assume
                        that
                        > it cannot have disappeared completely. It is sometimes used as a
                        > man's nickname among the Slovaks.
                        >
                        > In a broader picture, it's ancient Indo-European (if not older), not
                        > even merely Slavic; one of those (now often children's) words
                        created
                        > by repeating the same syllable, the second one of which was often
                        > subsequently modified (English: mummy, daddy, baby, yum-yum, the
                        words
                        > for "defecate/feces," British: geegee). _n~an~a_ is historically
                        > related to the English _nanny_. I wouldn't be surprised if versions
                        > of _n~an~a_ could be found, at least regionally, in many if not all
                        > the Slavic languages, and in many others in Europe.
                        >
                        >
                        > Martin
                        >
                        > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                        >
                      • LongJohn Wayne
                        Welcome to the club, Linda! ... ____________________________________________________________________________________ Need a vacation? Get great deals to
                        Message 11 of 11 , Sep 18, 2007
                          Welcome to the club, Linda!

                          --- gardnerlyn <JZELMS@...> wrote:

                          > Greetings! This is my first post-reply in this
                          > wonderful group of
                          > people. I have been a member for sometime, just
                          > listening to people
                          > talk about my ancesterial homeland. I am a second
                          > generation
                          > American. My Grandmother came over with her five
                          > year old sister.
                          > Just the two of them, my Grandmother was 13. I was
                          > never allowed to
                          > speak Slovak, Grandma would always say "You speak
                          > American!!!"
                          > My Dad always called my Grandfather Njan'o. I was
                          > nice to finally see
                          > the word in print. I have learned a lot from this
                          > group and I thank
                          > you. I have a silver needle holder that says
                          > Uniontown Pa. on it and
                          > now I have a connection. Happy Feast Day to you.
                          > Linda (Zekany)Zelms
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin
                          > Votruba" <votrubam@...>
                          > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > > There is a Rusyn term equivalent to "Dad", which
                          > is
                          > > >
                          > > > njan'o (phon: NYUN-yoh)
                          > > >
                          > > > and its diminutive ("Daddy"),
                          > > >
                          > > > njan'ko
                          > > >
                          > > > If this is the term you used, maybe you are
                          > Rusyn. I've never
                          > heard
                          > > > of this word in any dialect of Slovak.
                          > >
                          > > Just came across this looking for something else.
                          > It's not as
                          > common
                          > > today, but it does occur in older Slovak
                          > literature and even in the
                          > > grade school primer (probably copied over and over
                          > again from who
                          > > knows when). I don't know about all the dialects,
                          > but I'd assume
                          > that
                          > > it cannot have disappeared completely. It is
                          > sometimes used as a
                          > > man's nickname among the Slovaks.
                          > >
                          > > In a broader picture, it's ancient Indo-European
                          > (if not older), not
                          > > even merely Slavic; one of those (now often
                          > children's) words
                          > created
                          > > by repeating the same syllable, the second one of
                          > which was often
                          > > subsequently modified (English: mummy, daddy,
                          > baby, yum-yum, the
                          > words
                          > > for "defecate/feces," British: geegee). _n~an~a_
                          > is historically
                          > > related to the English _nanny_. I wouldn't be
                          > surprised if versions
                          > > of _n~an~a_ could be found, at least regionally,
                          > in many if not all
                          > > the Slavic languages, and in many others in
                          > Europe.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Martin
                          > >
                          > > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          >




                          ____________________________________________________________________________________
                          Need a vacation? Get great deals
                          to amazing places on Yahoo! Travel.
                          http://travel.yahoo.com/
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.