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Sui Vesan

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  • Martin Votruba
    NPR s Weekend Edition (May 7) had a brief segment about an unusual Slovak singer. Their website has two tracks from her new album Merging with the Brook :
    Message 1 of 9 , May 7, 2006
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      NPR's Weekend Edition (May 7) had a brief segment about an unusual
      Slovak singer. Their website has two tracks from her new album
      "Merging with the Brook":

      http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5371503

      A track from her earlier album "Sui" and an interview with her is here:

      http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/world/interviews/int_sui.shtml

      Reviews of her work are elsewhere on the web.


      Sui Vesan is her made-up name which she explains as a combination of
      an acronym (from "I'm with you right away" -- Som U teba Ihned) plus a
      modified place name from the island of Corsica (Veatsean, which
      apparently means "120" -- I have not been able to find it). She added
      the Slovak slash-like lengthening mark on the _i_ in order to "make it
      like the wind," she says.

      She sings in Slovak (Malinka som...), in a meaningless sequence of
      syllables that she calls _tatlanina_ (-ina is a typical ending in the
      names of languages: slovencina, anglictina) as in Merging with the
      Brook, and in a combination of both (Running Through the Hollow Tree).

      Her regular name is Jana Ondrejkova. She comes from Banovce nad
      Bebravou (near Trencin, West Slovakia). She was a kindergarten
      teacher and a stay-at-home mother before she started her singing
      career in the 1990s, first under her nickname from younger years
      _C~melka_ (a made-up combination of the words for "bumblebee" and
      "honey bee").

      The literal translation of the Slovak name of the track Running
      Through the Hollow Tree (Beh po butlavom strome) is "running along [or
      up and down] a hollow tree."


      Martin

      votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
    • memzommi1@aol.com
      very interesting and somehow soothing! Thank you again, Martin. from Marianne [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 9 , May 7, 2006
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        very interesting and somehow soothing! Thank you again, Martin. from
        Marianne


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Helen Fedor
        I wonder if it s Ventiseri? H ... NPR s Weekend Edition (May 7) had a brief segment about an unusual
        Message 3 of 9 , May 8, 2006
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          I wonder if it's Ventiseri? <http://www.fallingrain.com/world/FR/0/Ventiseri.html>

          H




          >>> votrubam@... 05/07/06 12:40 PM >>>
          NPR's Weekend Edition (May 7) had a brief segment about an unusual
          Slovak singer. Their website has two tracks from her new album
          "Merging with the Brook":

          http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5371503

          A track from her earlier album "Sui" and an interview with her is here:

          http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/world/interviews/int_sui.shtml

          Reviews of her work are elsewhere on the web.


          Sui Vesan is her made-up name which she explains as a combination of
          an acronym (from "I'm with you right away" -- Som U teba Ihned) plus a
          modified place name from the island of Corsica (Veatsean, which
          apparently means "120" -- I have not been able to find it). She added
          the Slovak slash-like lengthening mark on the _i_ in order to "make it
          like the wind," she says.

          She sings in Slovak (Malinka som...), in a meaningless sequence of
          syllables that she calls _tatlanina_ (-ina is a typical ending in the
          names of languages: slovencina, anglictina) as in Merging with the
          Brook, and in a combination of both (Running Through the Hollow Tree).

          Her regular name is Jana Ondrejkova. She comes from Banovce nad
          Bebravou (near Trencin, West Slovakia). She was a kindergarten
          teacher and a stay-at-home mother before she started her singing
          career in the 1990s, first under her nickname from younger years
          _C~melka_ (a made-up combination of the words for "bumblebee" and
          "honey bee").

          The literal translation of the Slovak name of the track Running
          Through the Hollow Tree (Beh po butlavom strome) is "running along [or
          up and down] a hollow tree."


          Martin

          votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu






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        • Martin Votruba
          ... http://www.fallingrain.com/world/FR/0/Ventiseri.html Super, Helen, thank you. I m convinced that s it. It certainly looks like it could mean (or at least
          Message 4 of 9 , May 8, 2006
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            > I wonder if it's Ventiseri?
            http://www.fallingrain.com/world/FR/0/Ventiseri.html

            Super, Helen, thank you. I'm convinced that's it. It certainly looks
            like it could mean (or at least remind someone) of "120."


            Martin

            votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
          • sandman6294
            ... Meaningless? She is obviously referring to the language of the inhabitants of the lost continent of Atlantis. The use of _tatlanina_ is an attempt to
            Message 5 of 9 , May 8, 2006
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              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
              wrote:

              > She sings in Slovak (Malinka som...), in a meaningless sequence of
              > syllables that she calls _tatlanina_

              Meaningless? She is obviously referring to the language of the
              inhabitants of the lost continent of Atlantis. The use of _tatlanina_
              is an attempt to thinly disguise the term _atlantian_ (some
              say atlantean) which was their language.

              On the other hand, it could be a Central European variation on "skat"
              singing, which started during the Ragtime era and was prominent during
              the Jazz Age (i.e. Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway,
              Scatman John, etc.).

              From the spiritual point of view, there's always the "speaking and
              singing in tongues" explanation.

              RU
            • Martin Votruba
              ... RU, r u calling her a Babylonian? She s from Banovce nad Bebravou. Martin votruba at pitt dot edu
              Message 6 of 9 , May 8, 2006
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                > the "speaking and singing in tongues" explanation.

                RU, r u calling her a Babylonian? She's from Banovce nad Bebravou.


                Martin

                votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
              • krejc@aol.com
                did anyone plug in her audio song? i rather liked it. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Message 7 of 9 , May 8, 2006
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                  did anyone plug in her audio song? i rather liked it.


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • sandman6294
                  ... Hmmm, I didn t realize Banovce nad Bebrav was in Mesopotamia. ;-) For some reason she reminded me of Yma Sumac, the Inca Princess . .... if you re not
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 9, 2006
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                    --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > > the "speaking and singing in tongues" explanation.
                    >
                    > RU, r u calling her a Babylonian? She's from Banovce nad Bebravou.

                    Hmmm, I didn't realize Banovce nad Bebrav was in Mesopotamia. ;-)
                    For some reason she reminded me of Yma Sumac, the "Inca Princess".

                    ".... if you're not familiar with Ms.Sumac, she sang wordless vocals
                    in various exotic settings with a voice that defied belief and a
                    range that covered several octaves......."

                    ".....It is fairly uncommon for an untrained singer to have a vocal
                    range of two octaves. Trained singers aspire to three octaves but
                    sometimes fall short of that goal. It is practically unheard of to
                    have at one's command a vocal register of four and one half octaves.
                    Indeed, it is somewhat freakish, and musicians usually have no idea
                    how to exploit such a phenomenon to its best advantage."

                    http://www.sunvirgin.com/
                    http://www.artistdirect.com/nad/store/artist/album/0,,1635659,00.html

                    RU
                  • Taoz@aol.com
                    Boy what memories were brought forth by the mention of Yma Sumac. She was once in a musical called Flahooly which was not a hit by any means. But her
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 10, 2006
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                      Boy what memories were brought forth by the mention of Yma Sumac. She was
                      once in a musical called "Flahooly" which was not a hit by any means. But her
                      voice was just plain amazing. I have her album called "Voice of the Xtabay"
                      and I still marvel at the voice.

                      I understand they tried to train her for opera but I never did hear the
                      outcome of that. The amazing part of the musical was when she stood between a
                      basso-profundo and a coloratura soprano and could sing lower than him and
                      higher than her. Absolutely amazing.

                      Thanks for bringing up the memories

                      Pavel



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