Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Similarities between Slovaks and Czechs

Expand Messages
  • modra101
    I m an American who for the last 8 months has been living in a small apartment with two 24-year old guys, a Czech from Prague and a Slovak from Bratislava.
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 4, 2006
      I'm an American who for the last 8 months has been living in a small
      apartment with two 24-year old guys, a Czech from Prague and a Slovak
      from Bratislava. Here are my observations about Czechs and Slovaks
      based on watching their interactions and listening to their own words
      about Czechs and Slovaks:

      1) The same sense of humor - The same things make them laugh! I found
      that strikingly odd, but maybe that has to do with the fact that they
      are the same age and share the same interests: computers.

      2) Mutual intelligibility of the languages - Often they speak
      "Czecho-Slovak" to one another rather than English, particularly when
      they get lazy :). Marek, the Slovak, understands Filip, the Czech,
      100% of the time. Filip understands Marek about 80% and often has to
      get a clarification on an unknown vocabulary word. Filip says he never
      realized that he didn't understand Slovak well.

      In Slovakia, Slovaks watch Czech TV shows and movies all the time.
      They are exposed to the Czech language and thus, over time, understand
      Czech like native. On the other hand, in the Czech Republic, there
      are hardly any Slovak TV shows on and when there are, they are shown
      with Czech subtitles.

      3) Same types of food - When describing national dishes and preparing
      foods, the guys describe more or less the same things. The difference
      is in how the food is named in each language. The one thing that is
      uniquely different is Slovak bryndzove halusky. Filip said he's only
      ever had that while on a skiing trip in Slovakia.

      4) Surprisingly different histories - Being that their languages are
      so closely related, one would assume that the histories would be
      parallel. They aren't. Slovaks have a thousand years of struggle with
      Hungarians while the Czechs had their hands full with the Austrians.
      Both cultures developed down their own separate paths. With my two
      roommates it shows in how they describe traditions like how Slovaks
      hang "salonky", wrapped candies, on the Christmas tree and Czechs
      don't. Or that on Easter Monday Slovak boys pour water on the girls
      and Czechs don't.

      5) A united front - Marek describes the relationship between Czechs
      and Slovaks like this: "Czechs and Slovaks are like two brothers.
      There is a natural competitive nature between the two but out in the
      world they will stand by eachother and work as a team."

      I wrote this after reading what Katarina said:
      "Just an observations on "sticking together" - in my humble
      experience, Slovaks & Czechs are one of the few groups that I notice
      that do not stick together or help each other - at least in NY. We
      have Polish communities, Jewish, Chinese, etc where an expat can come
      & settle and find help. Not the Czechs or Slovaks. If someone has
      had a different experience - perhaps in a different state, I would
      love to hear about it. I find it very sad that this is the case."

      I think today we are dealing with a new generation of Czechs and
      Slovaks. The young people coming into the workforce and society today
      don't carry the "Czechoslovak" baggage such as living under communism
      and the inner squabbles of a single nation with two separate peoples.
      Therefore, these new Czechs and Slovaks are more competative and self
      sufficient. On one hand this new generation didn't fully experience
      the hardships under communism and may be "doomed to forget", but on
      the other hand, they are starting with a clean slate, the future looks
      bright and the world is their oyster.

      In clonclusion I'd say that both guys have respect for the other and I
      have never heard either say any desparaging remarks about the other's
      culture. But that could also be because both are polite decent people,
      lucky for me :).

      Margarete
    • Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)
      Hi Margarete - I just have to ask, so what language do YOU speak, and how much do you understand of what Filip and Marek say? Are you a native speaker, or did
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 4, 2006
        Hi Margarete - I just have to ask, so what language do YOU speak, and
        how much do you understand of what Filip and Marek say? Are you a
        native speaker, or did you learn as an adult?

        Joe


        ********
        2) Mutual intelligibility of the languages - Often they speak
        "Czecho-Slovak" to one another rather than English, particularly when
        they get lazy :). Marek, the Slovak, understands Filip, the Czech,
        100% of the time. Filip understands Marek about 80% and often has to
        get a clarification on an unknown vocabulary word. Filip says he never
        realized that he didn't understand Slovak well.
      • Plichta
        During my recent trip March 6-23 I asked this same question of my Slovak cousin concerning the mutual understanding of the Czech and Slovak languages. Jozef
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 4, 2006
          During my recent trip March 6-23 I asked this same question of my Slovak
          cousin concerning the mutual understanding of the Czech and Slovak
          languages.

          Jozef accompanied me on my week long trip to the Czech Republic because of
          my lack of the Czech language.

          Jozef told me that the older folks in Slovakia, meaning 30+ age group, have
          a fairly good understanding of the Czech language because of the influence
          of Czech TV. BUT, that is changing now. Now the emphasis is on English and
          so the Slovaks now watch CNN and other English language programming.
          Jozef's two sons, ages 13 and 11 are studying English in school and devote
          their time to English TV programs and computer games. The youngsters now
          are not exposed to the Czech language and it is much more difficult for them
          to understand.

          Frank R. Plichta
          Galax, Virginia

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of modra101
          Sent: Tuesday, April 04, 2006 2:13 PM
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [SPAM][Slovak-World] Similarities between Slovaks and Czechs

          I'm an American who for the last 8 months has been living in a small
          apartment with two 24-year old guys, a Czech from Prague and a Slovak
          from Bratislava. Here are my observations about Czechs and Slovaks
          based on watching their interactions and listening to their own words
          about Czechs and Slovaks:

          1) The same sense of humor - The same things make them laugh! I found
          that strikingly odd, but maybe that has to do with the fact that they
          are the same age and share the same interests: computers.

          2) Mutual intelligibility of the languages - Often they speak
          "Czecho-Slovak" to one another rather than English, particularly when
          they get lazy :). Marek, the Slovak, understands Filip, the Czech,
          100% of the time. Filip understands Marek about 80% and often has to
          get a clarification on an unknown vocabulary word. Filip says he never
          realized that he didn't understand Slovak well.

          In Slovakia, Slovaks watch Czech TV shows and movies all the time.
          They are exposed to the Czech language and thus, over time, understand
          Czech like native. On the other hand, in the Czech Republic, there
          are hardly any Slovak TV shows on and when there are, they are shown
          with Czech subtitles.

          3) Same types of food - When describing national dishes and preparing
          foods, the guys describe more or less the same things. The difference
          is in how the food is named in each language. The one thing that is
          uniquely different is Slovak bryndzove halusky. Filip said he's only
          ever had that while on a skiing trip in Slovakia.

          4) Surprisingly different histories - Being that their languages are
          so closely related, one would assume that the histories would be
          parallel. They aren't. Slovaks have a thousand years of struggle with
          Hungarians while the Czechs had their hands full with the Austrians.
          Both cultures developed down their own separate paths. With my two
          roommates it shows in how they describe traditions like how Slovaks
          hang "salonky", wrapped candies, on the Christmas tree and Czechs
          don't. Or that on Easter Monday Slovak boys pour water on the girls
          and Czechs don't.

          5) A united front - Marek describes the relationship between Czechs
          and Slovaks like this: "Czechs and Slovaks are like two brothers.
          There is a natural competitive nature between the two but out in the
          world they will stand by eachother and work as a team."

          I wrote this after reading what Katarina said:
          "Just an observations on "sticking together" - in my humble
          experience, Slovaks & Czechs are one of the few groups that I notice
          that do not stick together or help each other - at least in NY. We
          have Polish communities, Jewish, Chinese, etc where an expat can come
          & settle and find help. Not the Czechs or Slovaks. If someone has
          had a different experience - perhaps in a different state, I would
          love to hear about it. I find it very sad that this is the case."

          I think today we are dealing with a new generation of Czechs and
          Slovaks. The young people coming into the workforce and society today
          don't carry the "Czechoslovak" baggage such as living under communism
          and the inner squabbles of a single nation with two separate peoples.
          Therefore, these new Czechs and Slovaks are more competative and self
          sufficient. On one hand this new generation didn't fully experience
          the hardships under communism and may be "doomed to forget", but on
          the other hand, they are starting with a clean slate, the future looks
          bright and the world is their oyster.

          In clonclusion I'd say that both guys have respect for the other and I
          have never heard either say any desparaging remarks about the other's
          culture. But that could also be because both are polite decent people,
          lucky for me :).

          Margarete







          Yahoo! Groups Links
        • Vlad Nad
          Margarete, So, you are living with two young guys????? Times sure have changed! Thanks for the info though. Vlad modra101 wrote: I m
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 4, 2006
            Margarete,

            So, you are living with two young guys????? Times sure have changed! Thanks for the info though.

            Vlad

            modra101 <modra101@...> wrote: I'm an American who for the last 8 months has been living in a small
            apartment with two 24-year old guys, a Czech from Prague and a Slovak
            from Bratislava. Here are my observations about Czechs and Slovaks
            based on watching their interactions and listening to their own words
            about Czechs and Slovaks:

            1) The same sense of humor - The same things make them laugh! I found
            that strikingly odd, but maybe that has to do with the fact that they
            are the same age and share the same interests: computers.

            2) Mutual intelligibility of the languages - Often they speak
            "Czecho-Slovak" to one another rather than English, particularly when
            they get lazy :). Marek, the Slovak, understands Filip, the Czech,
            100% of the time. Filip understands Marek about 80% and often has to
            get a clarification on an unknown vocabulary word. Filip says he never
            realized that he didn't understand Slovak well.

            In Slovakia, Slovaks watch Czech TV shows and movies all the time.
            They are exposed to the Czech language and thus, over time, understand
            Czech like native. On the other hand, in the Czech Republic, there
            are hardly any Slovak TV shows on and when there are, they are shown
            with Czech subtitles.

            3) Same types of food - When describing national dishes and preparing
            foods, the guys describe more or less the same things. The difference
            is in how the food is named in each language. The one thing that is
            uniquely different is Slovak bryndzove halusky. Filip said he's only
            ever had that while on a skiing trip in Slovakia.

            4) Surprisingly different histories - Being that their languages are
            so closely related, one would assume that the histories would be
            parallel. They aren't. Slovaks have a thousand years of struggle with
            Hungarians while the Czechs had their hands full with the Austrians.
            Both cultures developed down their own separate paths. With my two
            roommates it shows in how they describe traditions like how Slovaks
            hang "salonky", wrapped candies, on the Christmas tree and Czechs
            don't. Or that on Easter Monday Slovak boys pour water on the girls
            and Czechs don't.

            5) A united front - Marek describes the relationship between Czechs
            and Slovaks like this: "Czechs and Slovaks are like two brothers.
            There is a natural competitive nature between the two but out in the
            world they will stand by eachother and work as a team."

            I wrote this after reading what Katarina said:
            "Just an observations on "sticking together" - in my humble
            experience, Slovaks & Czechs are one of the few groups that I notice
            that do not stick together or help each other - at least in NY. We
            have Polish communities, Jewish, Chinese, etc where an expat can come
            & settle and find help. Not the Czechs or Slovaks. If someone has
            had a different experience - perhaps in a different state, I would
            love to hear about it. I find it very sad that this is the case."

            I think today we are dealing with a new generation of Czechs and
            Slovaks. The young people coming into the workforce and society today
            don't carry the "Czechoslovak" baggage such as living under communism
            and the inner squabbles of a single nation with two separate peoples.
            Therefore, these new Czechs and Slovaks are more competative and self
            sufficient. On one hand this new generation didn't fully experience
            the hardships under communism and may be "doomed to forget", but on
            the other hand, they are starting with a clean slate, the future looks
            bright and the world is their oyster.

            In clonclusion I'd say that both guys have respect for the other and I
            have never heard either say any desparaging remarks about the other's
            culture. But that could also be because both are polite decent people,
            lucky for me :).

            Margarete






            SPONSORED LINKS
            Slovakia phone card Slovakia call Bratislava slovakia Hotel slovakia Slovakia phone Slovakia

            ---------------------------------
            YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


            Visit your group "Slovak-World" on the web.

            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


            ---------------------------------





            ---------------------------------
            Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. Great rates starting at 1¢/min.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.