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[Slovak-World] Re: More on

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  • Helen Fedor
    ... Sorry, I didn t mean that they were related etymologically, just that their meaning was quite similar. Sanskrit has/had , meaning to hurt , injure
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 31, 2006
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      > What's the etymology of <fras> and <d'as>? Those words remind
      > me of the Russian <bes> (Sologub's _Melkii bes_).

      Sorry, I didn't mean that they were related etymologically, just that their meaning was quite similar.

      Sanskrit has/had <das>, meaning "to hurt , injure" (from an online Sanskrit-English dictionary). I wonder if the Slovak <d'as> is the old IE connection rearing its head.

      H



      >>> votrubam@... 03/30/06 9:42 PM >>>
      > My guess is that it came from <zlo> (evil) and <duch> (spirit).

      Yes, Helen, and _duch_ could have meant a person here, like _a soul_
      (dus~a, related to duch, and to dychat "breathe") can in English, so
      _zloduch_ was also "an evil doer."

      Along similar lines, _zlodej_ "thief" was also originally "an evil
      doer" (the Russian dejat, Slovak diat sa "happen, take place." The
      same applies to _zloc~inec_ (criminal) -- _c~init_ = (old-fashioned) "do."


      > What's the etymology of <fras> and <d'as>? Those words remind
      > me of the Russian <bes> (Sologub's _Melkii bes_).

      It sounds similar, but they're probably not related: [b] and [d] don't
      get switched around between Slovak and Russian. _bes_ is likely a
      very old word for "an evil spirit," related to the Slovak _besny_
      "rabid" ("possessed [by evil spirits]"). However, I'm not aware of a
      plausible etymology of either of the Slovak words.

      _Frasz_ exists in Hungarian, but it may not be original. An old
      German name for epilepsy is _Fraisen_, but it's not clear that they're
      related, and if they are, the German word may not have been the source
      (quite the contrary, a person with that affliction may have been seen
      as affected by a "fras").

      Potentially, it's quite a maze with _das_. The Czech word _desny_
      means "frightening" today, and that could easily be related to the
      Slovak word. But the origin of _desny_ is no clearer than that of
      _das_ -- some of the possibilities are a link to "a chance encounter,"
      to "bad weather," to "scare" (if it could be a transformation of
      what's _uz~as_ in Russian), and there are more.

      But all of them seem quite dubious to me. The trouble is that while
      they might (barely, but might) be linked to _des-_, they can hardly be
      related to _das_. At the same time, it would be an unlikely
      coincidence if the Czech and Slovak words weren't related.


      Martin

      votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu





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