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Re: ear rings & Customs

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  • Martin Votruba
    ... Language would certainly be a good example, Julie. The trouble with pronunciation is that we know little about that in the more distant past and we need
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 15, 2005
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      > Does language count? Didn't the English -ing pronunciation come
      > from the lower class and replace the upper class -in (going vs
      > goin, hunting vs huntin). I'm not sure of when that would have
      > happened though.......

      Language would certainly be a good example, Julie. The trouble with
      pronunciation is that we know little about that in the more distant
      past and we need the 17th century or earlier with this. Shakespeare,
      for example, didn't employ -ng/-n as a class indicator. In this
      instance, both [-ng] and [-n] coexisted in the speech of both the
      lower and higher classes. In Northern British English, e.g., there is
      no [-ng], only [-n] and it has nothing to do with class. "Showing
      off" with -n is only known as a relatively recent occasional feature
      of the speech of some higher upper-class Brits as a display that they
      didn't need to worry about "good" pronunciation the way the upwardly
      mobile from the lower classes typically did and do.


      Martin

      votruba 'at" pitt "dot" edu
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