Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Ancestry notices us

Expand Messages
  • Andrea Vangor
    This is the beginning of a long article in the Nov. 1 newsletter from Ancestry.com. Let me know if anyone wants the rest posted. It s pretty good. Although
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      This is the beginning of a long article in the Nov. 1 newsletter from Ancestry.com. Let me know if anyone wants the rest posted. It's pretty good. Although I don't know if I like being "discovered"!

      Surfing for Slovak Ancestors, Part I
      by Lisa A. Alzo, M.F.A.

      Today nearly two million Americans claim Slovak ancestry. This vast number is not surprising since some 620,000 Slovaks came to America during the years of mass migration (1875-1914), making them one of the largest groups to come to our shores. With so many of us having Slovak roots, it is no wonder that the interest in Slovak genealogy has greatly increased over the past several years. While this article focuses on examples from my Slovak research, the resources listed can be helpful with other ethnicities as well.

      It used to be that if you were searching for ancestors from the "Heart of Europe" you could count on a long, arduous process, limited or highly restricted access to records, and other obstacles. When I began my own research some fifteen years ago, sites such as Google, Ancestry.com, and the Ellis Island Database did not exist, and online catalogs for the Family History Library (FHL) and the National Archives Records Administration (NARA) were not available. The field of genealogy has certainly come a long way since then. It is also no coincidence that the Internet has opened the doors for many Slovak genealogists.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • PRabich@aol.com
      Why not post the article. After all, that is what this site is for. Patricia Rabich aka Rebic(k) Benetis [Non-text portions of this message have been
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Why not post the article. After all, that is what this site is for.

        Patricia Rabich aka Rebic(k) Benetis


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • J. Michutka
        ... Here is the entire article; I just noticed that it s a part 1 , so maybe there will be more tomorrow. Skimming this article, I don t see anything that is
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          At 07:30 AM 11/1/2005 -0500, you wrote:
          >Why not post the article. After all, that is what this site is for.

          Here is the entire article; I just noticed that it's a "part 1", so maybe
          there will be more tomorrow.

          Skimming this article, I don't see anything that is specific to researching
          Slovak genealogy; it's basic research methods using resources that are now
          conveniently available through Ancestry.com.

          --Julie Michutka

          Surfing for Slovak Ancestors, Part I
          by Lisa A. Alzo, M.F.A.
          Today nearly two million Americans claim Slovak ancestry. This vast number
          is not surprising since some 620,000 Slovaks came to America during the
          years of mass migration (1875-1914), making them one of the largest groups
          to come to our shores. With so many of us having Slovak roots, it is no
          wonder that the interest in Slovak genealogy has greatly increased over the
          past several years. While this article focuses on examples from my Slovak
          research, the resources listed can be helpful with other ethnicities as well.
          It used to be that if you were searching for ancestors from the "Heart of
          Europe" you could count on a long, arduous process, limited or highly
          restricted access to records, and other obstacles. When I began my own
          research some fifteen years ago, sites such as Google, Ancestry.com, and
          the Ellis Island Database did not exist, and online catalogs for the Family
          History Library (FHL) and the National Archives Records Administration
          (NARA) were not available. The field of genealogy has certainly come a long
          way since then. It is also no coincidence that the Internet has opened the
          doors for many Slovak genealogists.
          While it may be tempting to begin your research with records located in the
          ancestral homeland, a better strategy is to begin on this side of the
          Atlantic, where records are typically more easily accessible. And with so
          much data available online, it is quite easy to start "surfing for Slovak
          ancestors." Part 1 of this two-part article will focus on using the
          available databases at ancestry.com to begin your research. In a future
          article, I will cover some additional useful websites specific to Slovak
          genealogy.
          Ancestry.com Databases
          While conducting research on my maternal side of the family for my first
          book, Three Slovak Women, I spent long hours in courthouses, Family History
          Centers, and libraries extracting data from microfilm and books, and waited
          for weeks for photocopies of passenger lists to arrive from the NARA. No
          wonder it took me six years! Now don't misunderstand, I am not knocking
          these more traditional methods of the research process, but it is much more
          convenient to access certain records online via my Ancestry.com subscription.
          U.S. Census Images and Indexes
          Before Ancestry added the "every name index" search feature, I had no luck
          locating my mother's family in the 1930 Census. Until the index, I was
          forced to conduct manual searches, looking at the individual pages for
          "Duquesne PA" and not finding any results. I was basing my search on my
          mother's recollections many years earlier that the family was living in
          Duquesne. Thanks to the index, I could type in the name "Figlar" and First
          Name "John" and use "Pennsylvania" for a broader search on the state. The
          second result on the page showed a John Figlar (head), age 34, coal miner,
          living in Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, PA, with his wife, Veronica,
          daughter Anna (my mother), and sons, John, Jr. and Joseph.
          Immigration Collection
          I spent a year searching for my grandmother's sister, Mary Fenchak. I
          exhausted my search of the Ellis Island Database (www.ellisisland.org) even
          with the Steve Morse Search Tool (www.stevemorse.org). Thus, I concluded
          she must have used another port of entry. One evening last December, at
          random, I decided to search Ancestry's Baltimore Passenger Lists,
          1892-1948. I typed in Mary Fenchak, selected the Soundex search option and
          finally struck gold! From family information, I knew I had the right person.
          Name: Maria Fenisak
          Arrival Date: Feb 1909
          Age: 18 years
          0 months
          Estimated Birth Year: 1891
          Gender: Female
          Race: Slovak
          Port of Departure: Bremen, Germany
          Ship Name: Rhein
          Port of Arrival: Baltimore, Maryland
          Friend's Name: Jabel Kirsner
          Last Residence: Hungary
          Message Boards
          I often scour Ancestry.com/RootsWeb.com's free Message Boards
          (www.ancestry.com/share), as well as those on, Genealogy.com
          (http://genforum.genealogy.com). Each site has a board for Slovakia, and
          you may even find boards that are dedicated to your surname, or your
          ancestor's town or village.
          Social Security Death Index
          Ancestry.com's Social Security Death Index (SSDI) lists over 72 million
          names dating from as early as the 1930s and is a good starting point for
          those beginning their genealogy. Researchers should keep in mind that the
          SSDI does not list every person who received Social Security Benefits. This
          index only lists deaths that were actually reported to the Social Security
          Administration.
          Once you've found the name of a relative, you can request a copy of the
          full Social Security report from the Social Security Administration. Simply
          click on "Order Original Application" to generate and print a pre-formatted
          letter. The cost is $27 if you can provide the SS#, otherwise it is $29.
          I've used the information I located using this index to obtain birth,
          death, and employment records for several family members.
          Military Records: World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918
          In 1917 and 1918, approximately 24 million men living in the United States
          completed a World War I draft registration card. The WWI draft registration
          cards database can be an extremely useful resource because it covers a
          significant portion of the U.S. male population in the early
          twentieth-century. In addition, these cards contain significant
          genealogical information such as birthplace, citizenship status, and
          information on the individual's nearest relative. This database helped me
          to locate the record of one of the most "elusive" ancestors in my family
          tree, my grandfather's brother, Samuel (Simeon) Figlar/Figler. Sam was a
          confirmed bachelor who froze to death by the side of the road after passing
          out from drinking too much alcohol. His body was buried in a pauper's grave.
          Unfortunately, family stories have not provided many specific facts about
          his life. Using Ancestry.com, I found Samuel's WWI Draft Registration Card.
          He was living in Pennsylvania and working as a laborer for the Equitable
          Coke Company in Harwick, and part of the little finger on his right hand
          was missing. I can now use details listed in this record to continue my
          search.
          Historical Newspapers
          Newspapers and periodicals have been described as "the diaries of local
          communities." They are excellent sources of family history details that may
          not be recorded elsewhere. By searching the historical newspapers
          collection on Ancestry.com, I've found obituaries, marriages, legal
          notices, that mention a number of my relatives and ancestors, as well as
          fascinating stories about the communities in which they lived.

          Online Classes
          Classes are another great way to connect with fellow researchers. The Basic
          and Intermediate Slovak Research classes I teach are the perfect venue for
          students to exchange information on surnames and villages through
          interaction on the course site and weekly class chats.
          With all of these great resources available at Ancestry.com alone,
          researching Slovak roots is no longer so daunting a task. And with new
          databases being added every day, you never know where your ancestors may be
          hiding. Whether you have been tracing your family tree for two months or
          twenty years, there has never been a better time to be a Slovak
          genealogist. Why not give it a try?

          Lisa Alzo is the author of Three Slovak Women, Baba's Kitchen: Slovak &
          Rusyn Family Recipes and Traditions (Gateway Press), and the recently
          published Finding Your Slovak Ancestors (Heritage Books), as well as
          numerous articles for genealogy magazines. She is an instructor of Eastern
          European, Slovak and Great Lakes Region genealogy classes for Myfamily.com,
          and is a frequent speaker at national conferences, genealogical and
          historical societies.
          Check out Lisa's Upcoming Classes at Ancestry.com
          Upcoming Event Where Lisa Will Be Speaking:
          ยท University of Pittsburgh Slovak Festival
          (November 6, 2005, Pittsburgh, PA)
          Details and links to upcoming events at www.lisaalzo.com



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • pjjano@aol.com
          We took the class from Lisa Alzo it was very interesting and informative recently We were in Salt Lake City, Utah and read some of the original church records
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            We took the class from Lisa Alzo it was very interesting and informative
            recently We were in Salt Lake City, Utah and read some of the original church
            records from 1790 -1850 it was really neat to see the names did not see ours but
            plan on going back to view them thanks for Ancestry.com for making a lot of
            information available I have obtained my grandfathers WW! draft reg and he
            had been in this country about 10 years... Paul Janosik


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • kddid_1999
            This is probably a dumb question, but when the LDS records the records from Slovakia, they record them in English right? Is there allot of misspellings, or
            Message 5 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              This is probably a dumb question, but when the LDS records the
              records from Slovakia, they record them in English right? Is there
              allot of misspellings, or transcript errors, due to the language
              transcriptions?


              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, pjjano@a... wrote:
              >
              > We took the class from Lisa Alzo it was very interesting and
              informative
              > recently We were in Salt Lake City, Utah and read some of the
              original church
              > records from 1790 -1850 it was really neat to see the names did
              not see ours but
              > plan on going back to view them thanks for Ancestry.com for
              making a lot of
              > information available I have obtained my grandfathers WW! draft
              reg and he
              > had been in this country about 10 years... Paul Janosik
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • J. Michutka
              ... They do not transcribe the records, they microfilm them. So you are seeing a microfilm copy of the original record. Records are often in Latin, sometimes
              Message 6 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                At 03:28 PM 11/1/2005 +0000, you wrote:
                >This is probably a dumb question, but when the LDS records the
                >records from Slovakia, they record them in English right? Is there
                >allot of misspellings, or transcript errors, due to the language
                >transcriptions?


                They do not transcribe the records, they microfilm them. So you are seeing
                a microfilm copy of the original record. Records are often in Latin,
                sometimes Hungarian, sometimes (esp more recent ones) Slovak. I've seen
                Slovak Jewish records in German and either Yiddish or Hebrew (used Hebrew
                script).

                The readability varies widely, from illegible to perfect. Sometimes the
                handwriting is large, clear, beautiful, but the letters are formed a little
                differently than modern American English, and that can be a stumbling block
                for a little while.

                So, you won't have to worry about transcription errors in the records you
                view! The pleasure--and pain--of figuring out the records will be all yours!

                Julie Michutka, cross-eyed from hours at microfilm readers
                jmm@...
              • gergely
                The only thing I have seen are actual photocopies of the records. Unless they are doing something new recently, the LDS leaves it up to you to make the
                Message 7 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  The only thing I have seen are actual photocopies of the records. Unless
                  they are doing something new recently, the LDS leaves it up to you to make
                  the errors.

                  The major problems I have seen was when the original was damaged, and did
                  not photocopy well.

                  as an aside, it's a real shame that digital cameras weren't readily
                  available when they did the photography. It would have resulted in a more
                  versatile database.

                  Jack Gergely
                  Newport News

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of kddid_1999
                  Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 10:29 AM
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Ancestry notices us


                  This is probably a dumb question, but when the LDS records the
                  records from Slovakia, they record them in English right? Is there
                  allot of misspellings, or transcript errors, due to the language
                  transcriptions?


                  --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, pjjano@a... wrote:
                  >
                  > We took the class from Lisa Alzo it was very interesting and
                  informative
                  > recently We were in Salt Lake City, Utah and read some of the
                  original church
                  > records from 1790 -1850 it was really neat to see the names did
                  not see ours but
                  > plan on going back to view them thanks for Ancestry.com for
                  making a lot of
                  > information available I have obtained my grandfathers WW! draft
                  reg and he
                  > had been in this country about 10 years... Paul Janosik
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >









                  Yahoo! Groups Links
                • Vladimir Bohinc
                  Making digital photos would have been a hell of a job. Now you have photos one after another on a film. At the beginning of the film there is a title, which
                  Message 8 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Making digital photos would have been a hell of a job.
                    Now you have photos one after another on a film.
                    At the beginning of the film there is a title, which says what it is.
                    I am making digital photos of the records, but have to transcript at least one record per photo at the same time, in order to later be able to recognize the photo. Namely, there are pages, which do not have a year on them. You take one such page out of the row and do some "versatility", but end up with a useless photo, if you do not know from what year it was.
                    Eventually, all photos taken must be renamed, so you know what you have. This is a lot of work and one has to be very careful.
                    Vladimir Bohinc

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: gergely
                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 4:55 PM
                    Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Re: Ancestry notices us


                    The only thing I have seen are actual photocopies of the records. Unless
                    they are doing something new recently, the LDS leaves it up to you to make
                    the errors.

                    The major problems I have seen was when the original was damaged, and did
                    not photocopy well.

                    as an aside, it's a real shame that digital cameras weren't readily
                    available when they did the photography. It would have resulted in a more
                    versatile database.

                    Jack Gergely
                    Newport News

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of kddid_1999
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 10:29 AM
                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Ancestry notices us


                    This is probably a dumb question, but when the LDS records the
                    records from Slovakia, they record them in English right? Is there
                    allot of misspellings, or transcript errors, due to the language
                    transcriptions?


                    --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, pjjano@a... wrote:
                    >
                    > We took the class from Lisa Alzo it was very interesting and
                    informative
                    > recently We were in Salt Lake City, Utah and read some of the
                    original church
                    > records from 1790 -1850 it was really neat to see the names did
                    not see ours but
                    > plan on going back to view them thanks for Ancestry.com for
                    making a lot of
                    > information available I have obtained my grandfathers WW! draft
                    reg and he
                    > had been in this country about 10 years... Paul Janosik
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >









                    Yahoo! Groups Links










                    SPONSORED LINKS Slovakia phone card Slovakia call Bratislava slovakia
                    Hotel slovakia Slovakia phone Slovakia


                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

                    a.. Visit your group "Slovak-World" on the web.

                    b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                    c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------



                    __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.1267 (20051028) __________

                    Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
                    http://www.eset.sk


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • sandman6294
                    ... seeing a microfilm copy of the original record. Records are often in Latin, sometimes Hungarian, sometimes (esp more recent ones) Slovak. I ve seen Slovak
                    Message 9 of 12 , Nov 1, 2005
                    • 0 Attachment
                      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "J. Michutka" <jmm@p...> wrote:

                      > They do not transcribe the records, they microfilm them. So you are
                      seeing a microfilm copy of the original record. Records are often in
                      Latin, sometimes Hungarian, sometimes (esp more recent ones) Slovak.
                      I've seen Slovak Jewish records in German and either Yiddish or Hebrew
                      (used Hebrew script).<

                      If the records are for what is now NE and E Slovakia, you can also find
                      records in Rusyn (or perhaps Church Slavonic), which use the Cyrillic
                      alphabet. Reading cursive Cyrillic can get you to cursing at times.

                      RU
                    • Gregory J Kopchak
                      Needing to transliterate AND translate can be a pain. It s interesting that 10 years ago I requested a birth certificate from the Slovak Archive and got a Not
                      Message 10 of 12 , Nov 2, 2005
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Needing to transliterate AND translate can be a pain.

                        It's interesting that 10 years ago I requested a birth certificate
                        from the Slovak Archive and got a "Not Found" message from them.

                        When the LDS records for Slovakia were done, I did find the
                        record I was looking for right where it should have been but the
                        name was in Cyrillic letters.

                        The clerk at the Slovak Archive was looking for English style letters.

                        Greg Kopchak
                        It's All Relative


                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                        [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of sandman6294
                        Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 5:04 PM
                        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: LDS records


                        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "J. Michutka" <jmm@p...> wrote:

                        > They do not transcribe the records, they microfilm them. So you are
                        seeing a microfilm copy of the original record. Records are often in
                        Latin, sometimes Hungarian, sometimes (esp more recent ones) Slovak.
                        I've seen Slovak Jewish records in German and either Yiddish or Hebrew
                        (used Hebrew script).<

                        If the records are for what is now NE and E Slovakia, you can also find
                        records in Rusyn (or perhaps Church Slavonic), which use the Cyrillic
                        alphabet. Reading cursive Cyrillic can get you to cursing at times.

                        RU







                        Yahoo! Groups Links
                      • gergely
                        Wow! I haven t run across any Cyrillic records yet. That would slow things down considerably for me. Jack Gergely Newport News ... From:
                        Message 11 of 12 , Nov 2, 2005
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Wow! I haven't run across any Cyrillic records yet. That would slow things
                          down considerably for me.

                          Jack Gergely
                          Newport News

                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                          [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Gregory J Kopchak
                          Sent: Wednesday, November 02, 2005 9:10 AM
                          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Re: LDS records


                          Needing to transliterate AND translate can be a pain.

                          It's interesting that 10 years ago I requested a birth certificate
                          from the Slovak Archive and got a "Not Found" message from them.

                          When the LDS records for Slovakia were done, I did find the
                          record I was looking for right where it should have been but the
                          name was in Cyrillic letters.

                          The clerk at the Slovak Archive was looking for English style letters.

                          Greg Kopchak
                          It's All Relative


                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                          [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of sandman6294
                          Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 5:04 PM
                          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: LDS records


                          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "J. Michutka" <jmm@p...> wrote:

                          > They do not transcribe the records, they microfilm them. So you are
                          seeing a microfilm copy of the original record. Records are often in
                          Latin, sometimes Hungarian, sometimes (esp more recent ones) Slovak.
                          I've seen Slovak Jewish records in German and either Yiddish or Hebrew
                          (used Hebrew script).<

                          If the records are for what is now NE and E Slovakia, you can also find
                          records in Rusyn (or perhaps Church Slavonic), which use the Cyrillic
                          alphabet. Reading cursive Cyrillic can get you to cursing at times.

                          RU







                          Yahoo! Groups Links












                          Yahoo! Groups Links
                        • e.gernat@att.net
                          WWWe did not do to bad in reading the names in Cyrillic. Ed ... From: gergely
                          Message 12 of 12 , Nov 2, 2005
                          • 0 Attachment
                            WWWe did not do to bad in reading the names in Cyrillic. Ed
                            -------------- Original message ----------------------
                            From: "gergely" <gergely@...>
                            > Wow! I haven't run across any Cyrillic records yet. That would slow things
                            > down considerably for me.
                            >
                            > Jack Gergely
                            > Newport News
                            >
                            > -----Original Message-----
                            > From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                            > [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Gregory J Kopchak
                            > Sent: Wednesday, November 02, 2005 9:10 AM
                            > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Re: LDS records
                            >
                            >
                            > Needing to transliterate AND translate can be a pain.
                            >
                            > It's interesting that 10 years ago I requested a birth certificate
                            > from the Slovak Archive and got a "Not Found" message from them.
                            >
                            > When the LDS records for Slovakia were done, I did find the
                            > record I was looking for right where it should have been but the
                            > name was in Cyrillic letters.
                            >
                            > The clerk at the Slovak Archive was looking for English style letters.
                            >
                            > Greg Kopchak
                            > It's All Relative
                            >
                            >
                            > -----Original Message-----
                            > From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                            > [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of sandman6294
                            > Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 5:04 PM
                            > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: LDS records
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "J. Michutka" <jmm@p...> wrote:
                            >
                            > > They do not transcribe the records, they microfilm them. So you are
                            > seeing a microfilm copy of the original record. Records are often in
                            > Latin, sometimes Hungarian, sometimes (esp more recent ones) Slovak.
                            > I've seen Slovak Jewish records in German and either Yiddish or Hebrew
                            > (used Hebrew script).<
                            >
                            > If the records are for what is now NE and E Slovakia, you can also find
                            > records in Rusyn (or perhaps Church Slavonic), which use the Cyrillic
                            > alphabet. Reading cursive Cyrillic can get you to cursing at times.
                            >
                            > RU
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.