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Re: More about the Slovak language

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  • andreialexiev
    I believe the Central Slovak theory to be correct.I read somewhere that there was one large Slavic tribe, the Slovenes extending from Southwest to
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 29, 2005
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      I believe the Central Slovak theory to be correct.I read somewhere
      that there was one large Slavic tribe, the Slovenes extending from
      Southwest to Northeast.The Northeasterners seperated and ended up
      merging with the Finnic tribes in what is today Northern European
      Russia,these became the Great Russians.Later the Magyar invasion
      split the tribe once more into today's Slovaks and Slovenes.As for
      the Czechs, they are thought to be Ukrainians who migrated west(this
      I head from Prof.Michael Kopanic, who used to be one of the hosts of
      the Sunday evening Slovak radio program the the University of
      Akron,which I used to listen to during my years in Cleveland).If the
      Ukrainian theory about the Czechs is true,they would have had to
      pass through what is now Slovakia to get there.That couls explain
      some similarities between East Slovak and some Czech
      dialects.Somewhere I have a book "Guide to the Slavic langueges" by
      Regis DuBray.He mentions similarities between Eastern and Western
      Slovak dialects.--- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor"
      <hfed@l...> wrote:
      > I'm not sure about the Central Slovaks theory. Martin? But I
      know that the eastern dialects don't bear a resemblance to those of
      the west. They have features in common with western CZECH
      dialects. Two words that come to mind are "mlieko" (stand. Sl.)
      vs. "mliko" for both Cz. and east. Sl., and "slnko" vs. "slunko".
      >
      > H
      >
      >
      >
      > >>> drav@o... 07/29/05 1:17 PM >>>
      > I think the theory is that the modern Central Slovaks are people
      who were pushed north by the Magyars. The older Slovak population
      was itself pushed sideways east and west. Therefore the recent
      dialects in east and west Slovakia are relatively similar.
      >
      > The central dialects were chosen by 19th century scholars as the
      norm for the language when in fact they were less "typical" than the
      dialects of the eastern and western regions. I think the first
      attempt to codify the language in the 18th century used western
      dialects as the basis.
      >
      > Anyone who watches old movies knows that "ideal" American English
      before World War II was the mid-Atlantic accent of the eastern
      seaboard upper classes. I wonder if it became midwestern after so
      many people from that region migrated to Southern California and
      ended up in broadcasting.
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Helen Fedor
      > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, July 29, 2005 7:07 AM
      > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] More about the Slovak language
      >
      >
      > Sort of. Colloquial has nothing to do with dialects. We have
      different levels of English that ew speak. There's standard English
      ("I can't remember what I was going to say."), colloquial ("I
      suddenly draw a blank."), and slang ("Brain freeze!" [as the kids
      say]).
      >
      > Standard Slovak was based on the central Slovak dialects, so
      those dialects are closer to sounding grammatically correct than the
      eastern dialects, which are quite different. Standard English
      pronounciation (e.g. on TV news) is based on English as it's spoken
      in the Midwest (they're most neutral sounding). Someone living in
      the "hollers" of Kentucky or West Virginia would speak an English
      that would sound grammatically and pronounciationally [is that a
      word?] incorrect to a speaker of standard English.
      But "Appalachian" English has its own set of grammar rules,
      vocabulary (somewhat antiquated, at times), and sound
      transformations.
      >
      > Yes, sometimes the Eastern dialects do sound more Polish.
      Someone once said that there were similarities (was it you Martin?)
      between western Czech and eastern Slovak dialects. I forget the
      reason why.
      >
      > H
      >
      >
      >
      > >>> lil.junas@w... 07/29/05 9:38 AM >>>
      > I remember hearing my dad tease my mother about the Junases
      speaking
      > better Slovak than the Wargos (my mother was a Wargo). But while
      working
      > in Slovakia for a year I realized that he was correct since the
      > western-central dialect is considered the "pure" Slovak while
      the Eastern
      > Slovak is more colloqual. At least that's the way it was
      explained to me.
      > Many Eastern pronunciatiolns sound more than the Czech or
      Polish --like
      > "Yak so mash?" rather than the western-central's Ako sa mas?
      Am I on the
      > right track here?
      > Lil
      >
      >
      >
      > > The younger people are getting away from the dialects somewhat
      (the
      > > pervasive influence of schools, TV, etc.), but when I visited
      with my
      > > cousins in a village SE of Kosice in May, we spoke completely
      in dialect.
      > >
      > > You use the example of how the Hungarian word "baci" is used.
      In our
      > > Zemplin dialect, the borrowing is "bac~ik", more as a form of
      address, but
      > > also as a title. The construction "Kovac~-bac~i" isn't used,
      but you
      > > might hear "Bac~ik Kovac~". More likely you'd hear someone
      saying
      > > "Bac~ik, dze je..." just like in English we'd say "Sir, where
      is...".
      > > "Bac~ik" isn't a formal as "sir," but it does indicate someone
      who's older
      > > and who's being shown respect. The female equivalent
      is "nina", from the
      > > Hungarian "nenika". When my mother was older, some of the
      younger (than
      > > her) folks in the community would call her "Nina Fedorova".
      > >
      > > Rusin does influence some of the eastern dialects (I believe
      they're
      > > called the "s~o" dialects because they use "s~o" instead
      of "c~o" for
      > > 'what'), but in Zemplin, for example, "on zomrel" would
      be "von umar".
      > > Slovak is closer to the South Slavic languages (especially
      Croatian) than,
      > > say, Czech. Linguists believe that the Croatians used to live
      (well over
      > > 1,000 years ago) much further north, contiguous to the
      Slovaks, so that
      > > they spoke a common (or at least very similar) language that
      then
      > > gradually diverged and evolved into 2 separate languages when
      the 2 groups
      > > lived in their current locations.
      > >
      > > If you, or anyone else, could transcribe the songs, I'd be
      happy to take a
      > > stab at it. I don't have a copy of the movie though.
      > >
      > > Helen
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >>>> Andrei424@h... 07/28/05 3:56 PM >>>
      > > I have the Slovak language film,"Obchod na korze"(Shop on Main
      > > Street).Of course, that film is over 40 years old, but I'm
      wondering
      > > if the Slovak used in that film wasn't the language spoken many
      > > years ago when tha influence of Hungarian may have been much
      > > greater,for example the Hungarian word"baci" is used
      freqeuently in
      > > the film ,the wod is used following the name as it would be in
      > > Hungarian.For example,the main character,Britko, calls the
      elderly
      > > Mr. Kuchar,"Kuchar-bacsi" and the Jewish barber says to
      Piti,"Piti-
      > > bacsi, prosim t'a." Does anyone actually use the
      > > word "bacsi"("uncle") anymore?I get a paper from Canada
      > > called,"Rusnace u svece",which is written in what is described
      as
      > > the Rusnak language of Voivodina,Yugoslavia.It actually seems
      to be
      > > an East Slovak dialect written in Cyrillic alphabet.It uses
      some
      > > Hungarian words,"bacsi", also "varos" for city, "farkas" for
      wolf,
      > > etc.Other words show clear Polisn influence,"caly' for
      ciely,also
      > > the v often is placed before o, such as, "von, vona, vono",
      instead
      > > of, on,ona, ono,for example, "he died" would be "on zomrel" in
      > > Slovak, but "von umarl" in "Rusnak".Any thoughts on this?
      Also, can
      > > anyone indentify the words to two songs in the above-mentioned
      movie?
      > > There is the one marching song sung by a group of Gardists
      marching
      > > and later around the monument in the town square.Then there is
      also
      > > the first song sung in the tavern by the Gardist leader
      accompanied
      > > by thr Primas and the Gypsy orchestra, something about being on
      > > guard duty.THe other two songs,"rosmarija" and,"Tam okolo
      Levoci",I
      > > can idenitfy readily enough.Thanks,Fr. Andrei
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
      > >
      > > Visit your group "Slovak-World" on the web.
      > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > > Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
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      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
      >
      > Visit your group "Slovak-World" on the web.
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    • Dr. Joe Q
      Yak sa mas^, is what my cousins still use in Bardejov and about half of them are Rusyn . Dr. Q ... __________________________________________________ Do You
      Message 2 of 19 , Jul 29, 2005
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        Yak sa mas^, is what my cousins still use in Bardejov
        and about half of them are "Rusyn".

        Dr. "Q"

        --- "Lil M. Junas" <lil.junas@...> wrote:

        > I remember hearing my dad tease my mother about the
        > Junases speaking
        > better Slovak than the Wargos (my mother was a
        > Wargo). But while working
        > in Slovakia for a year I realized that he was
        > correct since the
        > western-central dialect is considered the "pure"
        > Slovak while the Eastern
        > Slovak is more colloqual. At least that's the way it
        > was explained to me.
        > Many Eastern pronunciatiolns sound more than the
        > Czech or Polish --like
        > "Yak so mash?" rather than the western-central's
        > Ako sa mas? Am I on the
        > right track here?
        > Lil
        >
        >
        >
        > > The younger people are getting away from the
        > dialects somewhat (the
        > > pervasive influence of schools, TV, etc.), but
        > when I visited with my
        > > cousins in a village SE of Kosice in May, we spoke
        > completely in dialect.
        > >
        > > You use the example of how the Hungarian word
        > "baci" is used. In our
        > > Zemplin dialect, the borrowing is "bac~ik", more
        > as a form of address, but
        > > also as a title. The construction "Kovac~-bac~i"
        > isn't used, but you
        > > might hear "Bac~ik Kovac~". More likely you'd
        > hear someone saying
        > > "Bac~ik, dze je..." just like in English we'd say
        > "Sir, where is...".
        > > "Bac~ik" isn't a formal as "sir," but it does
        > indicate someone who's older
        > > and who's being shown respect. The female
        > equivalent is "nina", from the
        > > Hungarian "nenika". When my mother was older,
        > some of the younger (than
        > > her) folks in the community would call her "Nina
        > Fedorova".
        > >
        > > Rusin does influence some of the eastern dialects
        > (I believe they're
        > > called the "s~o" dialects because they use "s~o"
        > instead of "c~o" for
        > > 'what'), but in Zemplin, for example, "on zomrel"
        > would be "von umar".
        > > Slovak is closer to the South Slavic languages
        > (especially Croatian) than,
        > > say, Czech. Linguists believe that the Croatians
        > used to live (well over
        > > 1,000 years ago) much further north, contiguous to
        > the Slovaks, so that
        > > they spoke a common (or at least very similar)
        > language that then
        > > gradually diverged and evolved into 2 separate
        > languages when the 2 groups
        > > lived in their current locations.
        > >
        > > If you, or anyone else, could transcribe the
        > songs, I'd be happy to take a
        > > stab at it. I don't have a copy of the movie
        > though.
        > >
        > > Helen
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >>>> Andrei424@... 07/28/05 3:56 PM >>>
        > > I have the Slovak language film,"Obchod na
        > korze"(Shop on Main
        > > Street).Of course, that film is over 40 years old,
        > but I'm wondering
        > > if the Slovak used in that film wasn't the
        > language spoken many
        > > years ago when tha influence of Hungarian may have
        > been much
        > > greater,for example the Hungarian word"baci" is
        > used freqeuently in
        > > the film ,the wod is used following the name as it
        > would be in
        > > Hungarian.For example,the main character,Britko,
        > calls the elderly
        > > Mr. Kuchar,"Kuchar-bacsi" and the Jewish barber
        > says to Piti,"Piti-
        > > bacsi, prosim t'a." Does anyone actually use the
        > > word "bacsi"("uncle") anymore?I get a paper from
        > Canada
        > > called,"Rusnace u svece",which is written in what
        > is described as
        > > the Rusnak language of Voivodina,Yugoslavia.It
        > actually seems to be
        > > an East Slovak dialect written in Cyrillic
        > alphabet.It uses some
        > > Hungarian words,"bacsi", also "varos" for city,
        > "farkas" for wolf,
        > > etc.Other words show clear Polisn influence,"caly'
        > for ciely,also
        > > the v often is placed before o, such as, "von,
        > vona, vono", instead
        > > of, on,ona, ono,for example, "he died" would be
        > "on zomrel" in
        > > Slovak, but "von umarl" in "Rusnak".Any thoughts
        > on this? Also, can
        > > anyone indentify the words to two songs in the
        > above-mentioned movie?
        > > There is the one marching song sung by a group of
        > Gardists marching
        > > and later around the monument in the town
        > square.Then there is also
        > > the first song sung in the tavern by the Gardist
        > leader accompanied
        > > by thr Primas and the Gypsy orchestra, something
        > about being on
        > > guard duty.THe other two songs,"rosmarija"
        > and,"Tam okolo Levoci",I
        > > can idenitfy readily enough.Thanks,Fr. Andrei
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        > >
        > > Visit your group "Slovak-World" on the web.
        > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email
        > to:
        > > Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
        > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >


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      • krejc@aol.com
        does anyone recall something sounding like : ako see my o my mother used to say this and i thought it meant how are you? her grandmother was from near
        Message 3 of 19 , Jul 30, 2005
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          does anyone recall something sounding like :

          ako see my o

          my mother used to say this and i thought it meant how are you?
          her grandmother was from near Kezmarok, more specifically Majerka. her
          mother was from a smaller village nearby.
          Noreen



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • gergely
          Yak sa mas^,was common when I was a kid in SW PA, but somehow, I always thought it was Polish. Live and learn. Jack Gergely ... From:
          Message 4 of 19 , Jul 30, 2005
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            Yak sa mas^,was common when I was a kid in SW PA, but somehow, I always
            thought it was Polish.
            Live and learn.

            Jack Gergely

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Dr. Joe Q
            Sent: Friday, July 29, 2005 10:59 PM
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] More about the Slovak language


            Yak sa mas^, is what my cousins still use in Bardejov
            and about half of them are "Rusyn".

            Dr. "Q"

            --- "Lil M. Junas" <lil.junas@...> wrote:

            > I remember hearing my dad tease my mother about the
            > Junases speaking
            > better Slovak than the Wargos (my mother was a
            > Wargo). But while working
            > in Slovakia for a year I realized that he was
            > correct since the
            > western-central dialect is considered the "pure"
            > Slovak while the Eastern
            > Slovak is more colloqual. At least that's the way it
            > was explained to me.
            > Many Eastern pronunciatiolns sound more than the
            > Czech or Polish --like
            > "Yak so mash?" rather than the western-central's
            > Ako sa mas? Am I on the
            > right track here?
            > Lil
            >
            >
            >
            > > The younger people are getting away from the
            > dialects somewhat (the
            > > pervasive influence of schools, TV, etc.), but
            > when I visited with my
            > > cousins in a village SE of Kosice in May, we spoke
            > completely in dialect.
            > >
            > > You use the example of how the Hungarian word
            > "baci" is used. In our
            > > Zemplin dialect, the borrowing is "bac~ik", more
            > as a form of address, but
            > > also as a title. The construction "Kovac~-bac~i"
            > isn't used, but you
            > > might hear "Bac~ik Kovac~". More likely you'd
            > hear someone saying
            > > "Bac~ik, dze je..." just like in English we'd say
            > "Sir, where is...".
            > > "Bac~ik" isn't a formal as "sir," but it does
            > indicate someone who's older
            > > and who's being shown respect. The female
            > equivalent is "nina", from the
            > > Hungarian "nenika". When my mother was older,
            > some of the younger (than
            > > her) folks in the community would call her "Nina
            > Fedorova".
            > >
            > > Rusin does influence some of the eastern dialects
            > (I believe they're
            > > called the "s~o" dialects because they use "s~o"
            > instead of "c~o" for
            > > 'what'), but in Zemplin, for example, "on zomrel"
            > would be "von umar".
            > > Slovak is closer to the South Slavic languages
            > (especially Croatian) than,
            > > say, Czech. Linguists believe that the Croatians
            > used to live (well over
            > > 1,000 years ago) much further north, contiguous to
            > the Slovaks, so that
            > > they spoke a common (or at least very similar)
            > language that then
            > > gradually diverged and evolved into 2 separate
            > languages when the 2 groups
            > > lived in their current locations.
            > >
            > > If you, or anyone else, could transcribe the
            > songs, I'd be happy to take a
            > > stab at it. I don't have a copy of the movie
            > though.
            > >
            > > Helen
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >>>> Andrei424@... 07/28/05 3:56 PM >>>
            > > I have the Slovak language film,"Obchod na
            > korze"(Shop on Main
            > > Street).Of course, that film is over 40 years old,
            > but I'm wondering
            > > if the Slovak used in that film wasn't the
            > language spoken many
            > > years ago when tha influence of Hungarian may have
            > been much
            > > greater,for example the Hungarian word"baci" is
            > used freqeuently in
            > > the film ,the wod is used following the name as it
            > would be in
            > > Hungarian.For example,the main character,Britko,
            > calls the elderly
            > > Mr. Kuchar,"Kuchar-bacsi" and the Jewish barber
            > says to Piti,"Piti-
            > > bacsi, prosim t'a." Does anyone actually use the
            > > word "bacsi"("uncle") anymore?I get a paper from
            > Canada
            > > called,"Rusnace u svece",which is written in what
            > is described as
            > > the Rusnak language of Voivodina,Yugoslavia.It
            > actually seems to be
            > > an East Slovak dialect written in Cyrillic
            > alphabet.It uses some
            > > Hungarian words,"bacsi", also "varos" for city,
            > "farkas" for wolf,
            > > etc.Other words show clear Polisn influence,"caly'
            > for ciely,also
            > > the v often is placed before o, such as, "von,
            > vona, vono", instead
            > > of, on,ona, ono,for example, "he died" would be
            > "on zomrel" in
            > > Slovak, but "von umarl" in "Rusnak".Any thoughts
            > on this? Also, can
            > > anyone indentify the words to two songs in the
            > above-mentioned movie?
            > > There is the one marching song sung by a group of
            > Gardists marching
            > > and later around the monument in the town
            > square.Then there is also
            > > the first song sung in the tavern by the Gardist
            > leader accompanied
            > > by thr Primas and the Gypsy orchestra, something
            > about being on
            > > guard duty.THe other two songs,"rosmarija"
            > and,"Tam okolo Levoci",I
            > > can idenitfy readily enough.Thanks,Fr. Andrei
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
            > >
            > > Visit your group "Slovak-World" on the web.
            > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email
            > to:
            > > Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
            > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >


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          • David
            Yes, that was also said in the town were I came from, but Ako sa mate, is correct at this point of time. (How are you?) Dave Kuchta
            Message 5 of 19 , Jul 30, 2005
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              Yes, that was also said in the town were I came from, but "Ako sa
              mate," is correct at this point of time. (How are you?)
              Dave Kuchta

              At 07:54 AM 7/30/2005, you wrote:
              >Yak sa mas^,was common when I was a kid in SW PA, but somehow, I always
              >thought it was Polish.
              >Live and learn.
              >
              >Jack Gergely
              >
              >-----Original Message-----
              >From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              >[mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Dr. Joe Q
              >Sent: Friday, July 29, 2005 10:59 PM
              >To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] More about the Slovak language
              >
              >
              >Yak sa mas^, is what my cousins still use in Bardejov
              >and about half of them are "Rusyn".
              >
              >Dr. "Q"
              >
              >--- "Lil M. Junas" <lil.junas@...> wrote:
              >
              > > I remember hearing my dad tease my mother about the
              > > Junases speaking
              > > better Slovak than the Wargos (my mother was a
              > > Wargo). But while working
              > > in Slovakia for a year I realized that he was
              > > correct since the
              > > western-central dialect is considered the "pure"
              > > Slovak while the Eastern
              > > Slovak is more colloqual. At least that's the way it
              > > was explained to me.
              > > Many Eastern pronunciatiolns sound more than the
              > > Czech or Polish --like
              > > "Yak so mash?" rather than the western-central's
              > > Ako sa mas? Am I on the
              > > right track here?
              > > Lil
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > > The younger people are getting away from the
              > > dialects somewhat (the
              > > > pervasive influence of schools, TV, etc.), but
              > > when I visited with my
              > > > cousins in a village SE of Kosice in May, we spoke
              > > completely in dialect.
              > > >
              > > > You use the example of how the Hungarian word
              > > "baci" is used. In our
              > > > Zemplin dialect, the borrowing is "bac~ik", more
              > > as a form of address, but
              > > > also as a title. The construction "Kovac~-bac~i"
              > > isn't used, but you
              > > > might hear "Bac~ik Kovac~". More likely you'd
              > > hear someone saying
              > > > "Bac~ik, dze je..." just like in English we'd say
              > > "Sir, where is...".
              > > > "Bac~ik" isn't a formal as "sir," but it does
              > > indicate someone who's older
              > > > and who's being shown respect. The female
              > > equivalent is "nina", from the
              > > > Hungarian "nenika". When my mother was older,
              > > some of the younger (than
              > > > her) folks in the community would call her "Nina
              > > Fedorova".
              > > >
              > > > Rusin does influence some of the eastern dialects
              > > (I believe they're
              > > > called the "s~o" dialects because they use "s~o"
              > > instead of "c~o" for
              > > > 'what'), but in Zemplin, for example, "on zomrel"
              > > would be "von umar".
              > > > Slovak is closer to the South Slavic languages
              > > (especially Croatian) than,
              > > > say, Czech. Linguists believe that the Croatians
              > > used to live (well over
              > > > 1,000 years ago) much further north, contiguous to
              > > the Slovaks, so that
              > > > they spoke a common (or at least very similar)
              > > language that then
              > > > gradually diverged and evolved into 2 separate
              > > languages when the 2 groups
              > > > lived in their current locations.
              > > >
              > > > If you, or anyone else, could transcribe the
              > > songs, I'd be happy to take a
              > > > stab at it. I don't have a copy of the movie
              > > though.
              > > >
              > > > Helen
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >>>> Andrei424@... 07/28/05 3:56 PM >>>
              > > > I have the Slovak language film,"Obchod na
              > > korze"(Shop on Main
              > > > Street).Of course, that film is over 40 years old,
              > > but I'm wondering
              > > > if the Slovak used in that film wasn't the
              > > language spoken many
              > > > years ago when tha influence of Hungarian may have
              > > been much
              > > > greater,for example the Hungarian word"baci" is
              > > used freqeuently in
              > > > the film ,the wod is used following the name as it
              > > would be in
              > > > Hungarian.For example,the main character,Britko,
              > > calls the elderly
              > > > Mr. Kuchar,"Kuchar-bacsi" and the Jewish barber
              > > says to Piti,"Piti-
              > > > bacsi, prosim t'a." Does anyone actually use the
              > > > word "bacsi"("uncle") anymore?I get a paper from
              > > Canada
              > > > called,"Rusnace u svece",which is written in what
              > > is described as
              > > > the Rusnak language of Voivodina,Yugoslavia.It
              > > actually seems to be
              > > > an East Slovak dialect written in Cyrillic
              > > alphabet.It uses some
              > > > Hungarian words,"bacsi", also "varos" for city,
              > > "farkas" for wolf,
              > > > etc.Other words show clear Polisn influence,"caly'
              > > for ciely,also
              > > > the v often is placed before o, such as, "von,
              > > vona, vono", instead
              > > > of, on,ona, ono,for example, "he died" would be
              > > "on zomrel" in
              > > > Slovak, but "von umarl" in "Rusnak".Any thoughts
              > > on this? Also, can
              > > > anyone indentify the words to two songs in the
              > > above-mentioned movie?
              > > > There is the one marching song sung by a group of
              > > Gardists marching
              > > > and later around the monument in the town
              > > square.Then there is also
              > > > the first song sung in the tavern by the Gardist
              > > leader accompanied
              > > > by thr Primas and the Gypsy orchestra, something
              > > about being on
              > > > guard duty.THe other two songs,"rosmarija"
              > > and,"Tam okolo Levoci",I
              > > > can idenitfy readily enough.Thanks,Fr. Andrei
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
              > > >
              > > > Visit your group "Slovak-World" on the web.
              > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email
              > > to:
              > > > Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
              > > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
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            • halfslovak
              When I was a child EVERYONE in my Hudson River town saidd Jak sa mas as a greeting including the Irish kids ,LOL. Now I have my little 2year old granddaughter
              Message 6 of 19 , Aug 3 4:09 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                When I was a child EVERYONE in my Hudson River town saidd Jak sa mas
                as a greeting including the Irish kids ,LOL. Now I have my little
                2year old granddaughter saying it every time she shakes hands :)(
                Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "gergely" <gergely@v...> wrote:
                > Yak sa mas^,was common when I was a kid in SW PA, but somehow, I always
                > thought it was Polish.
                > Live and learn.
                >
                > Jack Gergely
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                > [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Dr. Joe Q
                > Sent: Friday, July 29, 2005 10:59 PM
                > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] More about the Slovak language
                >
                >
                > Yak sa mas^, is what my cousins still use in Bardejov
                > and about half of them are "Rusyn".
                >
                > Dr. "Q"
                >
                > --- "Lil M. Junas" <lil.junas@w...> wrote:
                >
                > > I remember hearing my dad tease my mother about the
                > > Junases speaking
                > > better Slovak than the Wargos (my mother was a
                > > Wargo). But while working
                > > in Slovakia for a year I realized that he was
                > > correct since the
                > > western-central dialect is considered the "pure"
                > > Slovak while the Eastern
                > > Slovak is more colloqual. At least that's the way it
                > > was explained to me.
                > > Many Eastern pronunciatiolns sound more than the
                > > Czech or Polish --like
                > > "Yak so mash?" rather than the western-central's
                > > Ako sa mas? Am I on the
                > > right track here?
                > > Lil
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > > The younger people are getting away from the
                > > dialects somewhat (the
                > > > pervasive influence of schools, TV, etc.), but
                > > when I visited with my
                > > > cousins in a village SE of Kosice in May, we spoke
                > > completely in dialect.
                > > >
                > > > You use the example of how the Hungarian word
                > > "baci" is used. In our
                > > > Zemplin dialect, the borrowing is "bac~ik", more
                > > as a form of address, but
                > > > also as a title. The construction "Kovac~-bac~i"
                > > isn't used, but you
                > > > might hear "Bac~ik Kovac~". More likely you'd
                > > hear someone saying
                > > > "Bac~ik, dze je..." just like in English we'd say
                > > "Sir, where is...".
                > > > "Bac~ik" isn't a formal as "sir," but it does
                > > indicate someone who's older
                > > > and who's being shown respect. The female
                > > equivalent is "nina", from the
                > > > Hungarian "nenika". When my mother was older,
                > > some of the younger (than
                > > > her) folks in the community would call her "Nina
                > > Fedorova".
                > > >
                > > > Rusin does influence some of the eastern dialects
                > > (I believe they're
                > > > called the "s~o" dialects because they use "s~o"
                > > instead of "c~o" for
                > > > 'what'), but in Zemplin, for example, "on zomrel"
                > > would be "von umar".
                > > > Slovak is closer to the South Slavic languages
                > > (especially Croatian) than,
                > > > say, Czech. Linguists believe that the Croatians
                > > used to live (well over
                > > > 1,000 years ago) much further north, contiguous to
                > > the Slovaks, so that
                > > > they spoke a common (or at least very similar)
                > > language that then
                > > > gradually diverged and evolved into 2 separate
                > > languages when the 2 groups
                > > > lived in their current locations.
                > > >
                > > > If you, or anyone else, could transcribe the
                > > songs, I'd be happy to take a
                > > > stab at it. I don't have a copy of the movie
                > > though.
                > > >
                > > > Helen
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >>>> Andrei424@h... 07/28/05 3:56 PM >>>
                > > > I have the Slovak language film,"Obchod na
                > > korze"(Shop on Main
                > > > Street).Of course, that film is over 40 years old,
                > > but I'm wondering
                > > > if the Slovak used in that film wasn't the
                > > language spoken many
                > > > years ago when tha influence of Hungarian may have
                > > been much
                > > > greater,for example the Hungarian word"baci" is
                > > used freqeuently in
                > > > the film ,the wod is used following the name as it
                > > would be in
                > > > Hungarian.For example,the main character,Britko,
                > > calls the elderly
                > > > Mr. Kuchar,"Kuchar-bacsi" and the Jewish barber
                > > says to Piti,"Piti-
                > > > bacsi, prosim t'a." Does anyone actually use the
                > > > word "bacsi"("uncle") anymore?I get a paper from
                > > Canada
                > > > called,"Rusnace u svece",which is written in what
                > > is described as
                > > > the Rusnak language of Voivodina,Yugoslavia.It
                > > actually seems to be
                > > > an East Slovak dialect written in Cyrillic
                > > alphabet.It uses some
                > > > Hungarian words,"bacsi", also "varos" for city,
                > > "farkas" for wolf,
                > > > etc.Other words show clear Polisn influence,"caly'
                > > for ciely,also
                > > > the v often is placed before o, such as, "von,
                > > vona, vono", instead
                > > > of, on,ona, ono,for example, "he died" would be
                > > "on zomrel" in
                > > > Slovak, but "von umarl" in "Rusnak".Any thoughts
                > > on this? Also, can
                > > > anyone indentify the words to two songs in the
                > > above-mentioned movie?
                > > > There is the one marching song sung by a group of
                > > Gardists marching
                > > > and later around the monument in the town
                > > square.Then there is also
                > > > the first song sung in the tavern by the Gardist
                > > leader accompanied
                > > > by thr Primas and the Gypsy orchestra, something
                > > about being on
                > > > guard duty.THe other two songs,"rosmarija"
                > > and,"Tam okolo Levoci",I
                > > > can idenitfy readily enough.Thanks,Fr. Andrei
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                > > >
                > > > Visit your group "Slovak-World" on the web.
                > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email
                > > to:
                > > > Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                > > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > __________________________________________________
                > Do You Yahoo!?
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                > http://mail.yahoo.com
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              • agp@telerama.com
                ... Hi there neighbor! I didn t realise that you have family in Bardejov. Me too! My great aunt and great uncle live on Stöcklova where it is intersected by
                Message 7 of 19 , Aug 3 4:23 PM
                • 0 Attachment
                  At 23:09 03/08/2005, Dr. Joe Q wrote:
                  >-----Original Message-----
                  > > Yak sa mas^, is what my cousins still use in Bardejov
                  > > and about half of them are "Rusyn".
                  > >
                  > > Dr. "Q"


                  Hi there neighbor! I didn't realise that you have
                  family in Bardejov. Me too! My great aunt and
                  great uncle live on Stöcklova where it is
                  intersected by Pos^tova. Right next to the
                  hostinec! Which given the way my family has
                  always loved beer, is most appropriate!

                  Tony P
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