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Re: [Slovak-World]Olden days and the luxury of cloth

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  • Claudia Medvik
    Dear William, Forgive me, but I am always curious how peoples dealt the problem of diapers. Nowadays that is the one unavoidable odorous occasion even we
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2003
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      Dear William,

      Forgive me, but I am always curious how peoples dealt the problem of
      diapers. Nowadays that is the one unavoidable odorous occasion even we
      cannot avoid, no matter how rich or poor. Disposable diapers are a constant
      joke in movies, but how we lived before them seems impossible to comprehend
      or even a consider as a possibility! A mother's love must truly indeed be a
      powerful thing, for I can't imagine any other reason for dealing with volume
      of 'output' one infant can produce without disposable diapers. To our modern
      sensibilities, it is a miracle we ever lived past the Stone Ages !!! Do you
      have any memories how this was handled by our formidable ancestors?

      Claudia


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...>
      To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, March 01, 2003 11:09 AM
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Detective work for Helene


      > Many years ago I heard from my grandmother that the women wore no
      underwear.
      > They were able to "modestly" urinate by stepping to the side of the walk
      or road,
      > stand with legs apart, pull skirt front and rear and urinate.
      >
      > Clothing was a luxury in olden times. My grandparents told me that
      homes here
      > didn't have big closets. Most had a "trunk room". Seasonal clothing was
      stored
      > there.
      >
      > Most americans would shun our forefathers, who bathed once a week and did
      not use
      > deodorants and perfumed soaps, even though they worked very hard and sweat
      > profusely.
      >
      > In the early seventies, a trip on a train or bus gave memories of those
      days. It
      > angered me when people complained to me about the "smelly people".
      >
      > They had no deodorants at the time and all worked very hard. The odor was
      an
      > honest indication of hard work. My girlfriend couldn't understand why I
      wore a
      > "T" shirt under my shirt. She thought it "un-manly".
      >
      > Vilo
      >
      > This might seem like a trivial discussion but it indicates just how our
      thoughts
      > are trained to modern living.
      >
      > helenezx@... wrote:
      >
      > > In a message dated 3/1/3 7:12:02 AM, amiak@... writes:
      > >
      > > << If you choose to accept the assignment, you are the only one I know
      who is
      > > qualified to accept it. If you refuse the assignement, destroy this
      e-mail
      > > and pretend it was never sent! RON - TOO FUNNY
      > >
      > > THANKS FOR SHARING THIS REALLY WEIRD ARTICLE
      > >
      > > I CAN TESTIFY THAT ONE VILLAGE WOMAN DIDN'T WEAR UNDERWEAR - WHEN WE
      VISITED
      > > SHE WAS SQUATTING IN THE GARDEN AND HOPPED UP TO GREET US.
      > >
      > > DON'T AGREE WITH THE CONCEPT BELOW BUT IT DOES GET PEOPLE TALKING AND
      SUPPOSE
      > > THAT IS A BENEFIT.
      > >
      > > helene
      > >
      > > _ _ _
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
    • Ron Matviyak
      Sometimes we can learn from our neighbors, and sometimes from other societies. Dried grass was used by old Eskimo. It is not a far reach to imagine our
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 1, 2003
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        Sometimes we can learn from our neighbors, and sometimes from other
        societies. Dried grass was used by old Eskimo. It is not a far reach to
        imagine our ancestors also using this universal material!

        Of course I will welcome other answers with more 'scientific' or recorded
        basis.

        Ron


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Claudia Medvik <cmedvik@...>
        To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, March 01, 2003 10:39 AM
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World]Olden days and the luxury of cloth


        > Dear William,
        >
        > Forgive me, but I am always curious how peoples dealt the problem of
        > diapers. Nowadays that is the one unavoidable odorous occasion even we
        > cannot avoid, no matter how rich or poor. Disposable diapers are a
        constant
        > joke in movies, but how we lived before them seems impossible to
        comprehend
        > or even a consider as a possibility! A mother's love must truly indeed be
        a
        > powerful thing, for I can't imagine any other reason for dealing with
        volume
        > of 'output' one infant can produce without disposable diapers. To our
        modern
        > sensibilities, it is a miracle we ever lived past the Stone Ages !!! Do
        you
        > have any memories how this was handled by our formidable ancestors?
        >
        > Claudia
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...>
        > To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Saturday, March 01, 2003 11:09 AM
        > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Detective work for Helene
        >
        >
        > > Many years ago I heard from my grandmother that the women wore no
        > underwear.
        > > They were able to "modestly" urinate by stepping to the side of the walk
        > or road,
        > > stand with legs apart, pull skirt front and rear and urinate.
        > >
        > > Clothing was a luxury in olden times. My grandparents told me that
        > homes here
        > > didn't have big closets. Most had a "trunk room". Seasonal clothing
        was
        > stored
        > > there.
        > >
        > > Most americans would shun our forefathers, who bathed once a week and
        did
        > not use
        > > deodorants and perfumed soaps, even though they worked very hard and
        sweat
        > > profusely.
        > >
        > > In the early seventies, a trip on a train or bus gave memories of those
        > days. It
        > > angered me when people complained to me about the "smelly people".
        > >
        > > They had no deodorants at the time and all worked very hard. The odor
        was
        > an
        > > honest indication of hard work. My girlfriend couldn't understand why I
        > wore a
        > > "T" shirt under my shirt. She thought it "un-manly".
        > >
        > > Vilo
        > >
        > > This might seem like a trivial discussion but it indicates just how our
        > thoughts
        > > are trained to modern living.
        > >
        > > helenezx@... wrote:
        > >
        > > > In a message dated 3/1/3 7:12:02 AM, amiak@... writes:
        > > >
        > > > << If you choose to accept the assignment, you are the only one I know
        > who is
        > > > qualified to accept it. If you refuse the assignement, destroy this
        > e-mail
        > > > and pretend it was never sent! RON - TOO FUNNY
        > > >
        > > > THANKS FOR SHARING THIS REALLY WEIRD ARTICLE
        > > >
        > > > I CAN TESTIFY THAT ONE VILLAGE WOMAN DIDN'T WEAR UNDERWEAR - WHEN WE
        > VISITED
        > > > SHE WAS SQUATTING IN THE GARDEN AND HOPPED UP TO GREET US.
        > > >
        > > > DON'T AGREE WITH THE CONCEPT BELOW BUT IT DOES GET PEOPLE TALKING AND
        > SUPPOSE
        > > > THAT IS A BENEFIT.
        > > >
        > > > helene
        > > >
        > > > _ _ _
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > > Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
        http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        > >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
      • brieuc@aol.com
        Dear Claudia: To answer your question about how those of us who had babies in the Stone Age (before disposable diapers) handled the waste disposal, so to
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 1, 2003
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          Dear Claudia:

          To answer your question about how those of us who had babies in the "Stone
          Age" (before disposable diapers) handled the waste disposal, so to speak, we
          used cloth diapers and we washed them and used them over and over and over
          again....

          Of course there were disposables but they were very expensive and we only
          wildly splurged and bought them if we were going to take the infant on a trip.

          But then we were also the early Stone Age mothers who never bought infant
          pastuerized, sanitized, vitamin-added imitation milk formula in the
          grocery-store. We simply used the old-fashioned method for this also. And,
          surprisingly, our babies raely got sick. There were actually some things
          that really worked well in the old days.

          Laverne
        • Jan Lan
          At 03:27 PM 3/1/2003 -0500, you wrote: Dear Claudia: To answer your question about how those of us who had babies in the Stone Age (before disposable
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 1, 2003
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            At 03:27 PM 3/1/2003 -0500, you wrote:
            >Dear Claudia:
            >
            >To answer your question about how those of us who had babies in the "Stone
            >Age" (before disposable diapers) handled the waste disposal, so to speak, we
            >used cloth diapers and we washed them and used them over and over and over
            >again....

            They did have Diaper Service for the affluent. We used cotton diapers,
            diaper pails and a Maytag that took a licking, from a family of six, but
            kept on ticking for years.

            Janko


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          • Claudia Medvik
            Sorry, no offense intended. It was a strictly anthropological question. Native Americans used moss as an substitute for fabric, and the rural Chinese even
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 1, 2003
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              Sorry, no offense intended. It was a strictly anthropological question. Native Americans used moss as an substitute for fabric, and the rural Chinese even today allow their toddlers to run around outside in shoes and a top and that's all.

              As for cloth diapers, I have repeatedly apologized to my parents every time they bring up those family stories that as an infant I tested their lung capacity while changing me. On the other hand, my Mother always bragged of the tan she got while hanging out diapers to dry.

              Or perhaps my interest is rather in not having the opportunity to have babies of my own to gather my own er,,, research.

              Thanks Mom,
              Claudia
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Jan Lan
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, March 01, 2003 6:09 PM
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World]Olden days and the luxury of cloth


              At 03:27 PM 3/1/2003 -0500, you wrote:
              >Dear Claudia:
              >
              >To answer your question about how those of us who had babies in the "Stone
              >Age" (before disposable diapers) handled the waste disposal, so to speak, we
              >used cloth diapers and we washed them and used them over and over and over
              >again....

              They did have Diaper Service for the affluent. We used cotton diapers,
              diaper pails and a Maytag that took a licking, from a family of six, but
              kept on ticking for years.

              Janko


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            • Nick Holcz
              ... Nick
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 1, 2003
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                At 02:39 PM 1/03/2003 -0500, you wrote:
                >Dear William,
                >
                >Forgive me, but I am always curious how peoples dealt the problem of
                >diapers. Nowadays that is the one unavoidable odorous occasion even we
                >cannot avoid, no matter how rich or poor. Disposable diapers are a constant
                >joke in movies, but how we lived before them seems impossible to comprehend
                >or even a consider as a possibility! A mother's love must truly indeed be a
                >powerful thing, for I can't imagine any other reason for dealing with volume
                >of 'output' one infant can produce without disposable diapers. To our modern
                >sensibilities, it is a miracle we ever lived past the Stone Ages !!! Do you
                >have any memories how this was handled by our formidable ancestors?
                >
                >Claudia
                >
                >Disposable diapers? what is disposable about them? they live in the
                >landfill forever. before them which in is not that long ago ( our kids
                >never had them) we washed and dried cloth diapers ( fathers love their
                >babies as well you know) .


                Nick
              • Andrea Vangor
                And in cities, there was the professional diaper service company. A real public service. ... From: Nick Holcz To:
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 1, 2003
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                  And in cities, there was the professional diaper service company. A real
                  public service.


                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Nick Holcz" <nickh@...>
                  To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Saturday, March 01, 2003 8:45 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World]Olden days and the luxury of cloth


                  > At 02:39 PM 1/03/2003 -0500, you wrote:
                  > >Dear William,
                  > >
                  > >Forgive me, but I am always curious how peoples dealt the problem of
                  > >diapers. Nowadays that is the one unavoidable odorous occasion even we
                  > >cannot avoid, no matter how rich or poor. Disposable diapers are a
                  constant
                  > >joke in movies, but how we lived before them seems impossible to
                  comprehend
                  > >or even a consider as a possibility! A mother's love must truly indeed
                  be a
                  > >powerful thing, for I can't imagine any other reason for dealing with
                  volume
                  > >of 'output' one infant can produce without disposable diapers. To our
                  modern
                  > >sensibilities, it is a miracle we ever lived past the Stone Ages !!! Do
                  you
                  > >have any memories how this was handled by our formidable ancestors?
                  > >
                  > >Claudia
                  > >
                  > >Disposable diapers? what is disposable about them? they live in the
                  > >landfill forever. before them which in is not that long ago ( our kids
                  > >never had them) we washed and dried cloth diapers ( fathers love their
                  > >babies as well you know) .
                  >
                  >
                  > Nick
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                • barbara13140 <bhardin@tds.net>
                  Dear Fellow Slovaks: I can t help but put my 2 cents worth in...I was the oldest child of Slovak parents and helped raise my younger siblings. I also raised 4
                  Message 8 of 9 , Mar 2, 2003
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                    Dear Fellow Slovaks:
                    I can't help but put my 2 cents worth in...I was the oldest child of
                    Slovak parents and helped raise my younger siblings. I also raised 4
                    children of my own. I was taught by my Mother who learned from her
                    Mother and so on thru the generations. Some things stay the same. I
                    suspect most of us had similiar upbringings. None of my children ever
                    wore throw away diapers. (I agree with whoever said they are not
                    disposable but linger for eons in our landfills). We used only cloth
                    diapers and first dunked them in the toilet to "Pre-clean" them,
                    wrung them out by hand then soaked them in a diaper pail with a
                    little Dreft Laundry Detergent. I then washed them in my Maytag
                    washer using the hottest water available. Three washings for my
                    daughter who had extremely fair and tender skin.
                    Commercial baby food was rarely bought and only for emergencies. We
                    made our own. Slovak chicken soup with the vegetables, noodles and
                    broth mashed fine and stored in the freezer in little margarine cups
                    with lids was a particular favorite so was venison stew since my
                    husband loved to hunt.
                    However, in defense of modern day Mother's in today's economy - I was
                    a stay at home Mom. My husband supported us very well on his salary
                    alone. Now he's retired, the children are all grown and I work. We
                    just had our 43rd anniversary. I feel very sad that today's young
                    Mom's have to work to make ends meet. I'm sure the hardest thing
                    they've ever had to do was put that precious baby in the hands of
                    someone else to care for while they earn a living. I was blessed.
                    Regards to you all...I love reading your posts.
                    Barbara
                    PS: My Gramma Cerveny wore knickers - My Mom wore nothing. :o)




                    --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, brieuc@a... wrote:
                    > Dear Claudia:
                    >
                    > To answer your question about how those of us who had babies in
                    the "Stone
                    > Age" (before disposable diapers) handled the waste disposal, so to
                    speak, we
                    > used cloth diapers and we washed them and used them over and over
                    and over
                    > again....
                    >
                    > Of course there were disposables but they were very expensive and
                    we only
                    > wildly splurged and bought them if we were going to take the infant
                    on a trip.
                    >
                    > But then we were also the early Stone Age mothers who never bought
                    infant
                    > pastuerized, sanitized, vitamin-added imitation milk formula in the
                    > grocery-store. We simply used the old-fashioned method for this
                    also. And,
                    > surprisingly, our babies raely got sick. There were actually some
                    things
                    > that really worked well in the old days.
                    >
                    > Laverne
                  • Caye Caswick
                    Same here -- and I m not even a mother, an aunt, yes -- but a mother -- no. I was raised this same way and I haven t been what I consider sick since 2nd
                    Message 9 of 9 , Mar 2, 2003
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                      Same here -- and I'm not even a mother, an aunt, yes -- but a mother -- no. I was raised this same way and I haven't been what I consider "sick" since 2nd grade -- going on 42 and freezing (but not shoveling) here in Chicago.
                      Caye

                      "barbara13140 <bhardin@...>" <bhardin@...> wrote:Dear Fellow Slovaks:
                      I can't help but put my 2 cents worth in...I was the oldest child of
                      Slovak parents and helped raise my younger siblings. I also raised 4
                      children of my own. I was taught by my Mother who learned from her
                      Mother and so on thru the generations. Some things stay the same. I
                      suspect most of us had similiar upbringings. None of my children ever
                      wore throw away diapers. (I agree with whoever said they are not
                      disposable but linger for eons in our landfills). We used only cloth
                      diapers and first dunked them in the toilet to "Pre-clean" them,
                      wrung them out by hand then soaked them in a diaper pail with a
                      little Dreft Laundry Detergent. I then washed them in my Maytag
                      washer using the hottest water available. Three washings for my
                      daughter who had extremely fair and tender skin.
                      Commercial baby food was rarely bought and only for emergencies. We
                      made our own. Slovak chicken soup with the vegetables, noodles and
                      broth mashed fine and stored in the freezer in little margarine cups
                      with lids was a particular favorite so was venison stew since my
                      husband loved to hunt.
                      However, in defense of modern day Mother's in today's economy - I was
                      a stay at home Mom. My husband supported us very well on his salary
                      alone. Now he's retired, the children are all grown and I work. We
                      just had our 43rd anniversary. I feel very sad that today's young
                      Mom's have to work to make ends meet. I'm sure the hardest thing
                      they've ever had to do was put that precious baby in the hands of
                      someone else to care for while they earn a living. I was blessed.
                      Regards to you all...I love reading your posts.
                      Barbara
                      PS: My Gramma Cerveny wore knickers - My Mom wore nothing. :o)




                      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, brieuc@a... wrote:
                      > Dear Claudia:
                      >
                      > To answer your question about how those of us who had babies in
                      the "Stone
                      > Age" (before disposable diapers) handled the waste disposal, so to
                      speak, we
                      > used cloth diapers and we washed them and used them over and over
                      and over
                      > again....
                      >
                      > Of course there were disposables but they were very expensive and
                      we only
                      > wildly splurged and bought them if we were going to take the infant
                      on a trip.
                      >
                      > But then we were also the early Stone Age mothers who never bought
                      infant
                      > pastuerized, sanitized, vitamin-added imitation milk formula in the
                      > grocery-store. We simply used the old-fashioned method for this
                      also. And,
                      > surprisingly, our babies raely got sick. There were actually some
                      things
                      > that really worked well in the old days.
                      >
                      > Laverne


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