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Slovak Wedding Dance

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  • Andy Matta
    There is only one song on this CD, a 45 minute instrumental version of the traditional Bridal Dance played at Eastern European weddings. The Bridal Dance has
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 5, 2005
      There is only one song on this CD, a 45 minute instrumental
      version of the traditional Bridal Dance played at Eastern European weddings.


      The Bridal Dance has become an American tradition for the
      children and descendants of immigrants from what is now Slovakia, Poland,
      and western Ukraine.
      The CD is also great to use at Anniversary parties to recreate
      the magic of the original wedding reception.

      Played by a four piece wedding band, several Grammy nominees
      were involved in the recording, engineering and production of this CD.

      The last dance of an Eastern European wedding reception before
      the bride and groom leave the reception is usually reserved for Redovy
      (Radovy, Rjadovyj) or the Bridal Dance.

      All the guests at the reception line up for a last chance to
      dance with the bride.

      It is customary to donate money to the newly wed couple for the
      priveledge of the dance. The money is put into an apron, basket, plate, or
      decorated box before dancing with the bride.

      The starosta (master of ceremonies) keeps the line moving,
      allowing only a few turns before cutting in for the next guest's chance to
      dance and share with the bride their good wishes before she and the groom
      begin their new life.

      After each guest dances with the bride, they may receive a drink
      and a piece of the freshly cut wedding cake or pastry.

      Their are many variations in lyrics dependant upon what village
      the families were from.

      Each verse, when played or sung at a normal tempo takes about 25
      seconds to complete. A dance running 15 or 20 minutes can go through a lot
      of verses.

      Like many other Polish, Rusyn or Slovak songs sung by second or
      third generation immigrants, the words may be familiar but the meaning
      unknown.

      The words seem to have a serious and almost religious aire about
      them but the translation can be a surprise.

      Some verses are risque, some are just strange. We'll leave the
      risque verses for you to find on your own but include on this page a few of
      the more unusual ones.....


      Put some money in the plate
      Put some money in the plate
      for her high veiled bridal cap.
      for her high veiled bridal cap.

      Put some money in the plate.
      Put some money in the plate.
      Let the whole family help out.
      Let the whole family help out.


      The money is not enough.
      The money is not enough.
      Let the starosta help out.
      Let the starosta help out.

      The Bride would be happier,
      The Bride would be happier,
      if the groom was dancing with her.
      if the groom was dancing with her.

      Our bride is beautiful,
      Our bride is beautiful,
      but does she know how to work.
      but does she know how to work.

      And one the the strangest verses that I will let you translate
      from Slovak for yourself...


      Nasa mlada nevista
      Nasa mlada nevista
      Lem by jila kapustu.
      Lem by jila kapustu.
      The version in Slovak we are most familiar with starts out...


      Nasa mlada jak babka
      Nasa mlada jak babka
      zacepila ju svatka
      zacepila ju svatka
      The last to dance before the groom are the family of the bride
      and groom.


      Father dances with the bride
      Father damces with the bride
      He's so proud of his little girl
      He's so proud of his little girl

      Now the mother takes a turn
      Now the mother takes a turn
      Soon to have a family of her own
      Soon to have a family of her own
      After the final guest and family completes their dance with the
      bride, the groom takes his turn as the last verses play.....


      The bride dancing with the groom.
      The bride dancing with the groom.
      What a lovely couple they make.
      What a lovely couple they make.

      Take the bride away with you.
      Take the bride away with you.
      and love her till your death.
      and love her till your death.

      In Slovak the last verse would be...


      Vozmi ty ju ku sobi
      Vozmi ty ju ku sobi
      a miluj ju do smerti
      a miluj ju do smerti
      As the song ends, the bride and groom both leave the reception
      together.

      If we left out your favorite verse or missed an important part
      of the tradition as you know it, leave email to redovy@... and we
      will add it to the description here..

      If you have Carpatho-Rusyn, Lemko, Slovak or Polish roots and
      there is a wedding in your future, this is perfect.

      Available on CD, this recording sells for $16.00 plus shipping
      and handling




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