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Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak Roman Catholic Prayer meets Rusyn Prayer

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  • krejc@aol.com
    Tony, I enjoyed very much your email in which you shared your experience of the Chaplet of Divine Mercy. Our past Pontiff has made the world more aware of the
    Message 1 of 11 , May 2, 2005
      Tony,
      I enjoyed very much your email in which you shared your experience of the
      Chaplet of Divine Mercy. Our past Pontiff has made the world more aware of the
      great spirituality which has been given to the world from the Slavic countries.
      Prior to John Paul II, the only Slavic inspiriation that i knew was the
      wonderful and tender Infant Of Prague. The Infant stood in every household of my
      whole family that i can remember when growing up.
      my mother, in particular, felt a devotion to the Infant and i can remember
      that this was the first statue she ever bought for me to put in my bedroom.
      I noticed that you belong to a Croatian parish. my father's mother was from
      a village called Raslavice in very eastern Slovakia. i am starting to believe
      that she may have had Croatian roots. In another year or so, i am going to
      have the opportunity to research my family much better.
      thanks again for sharing and maybe you will make the trip someday to
      Stockbridge, Ma.?
      i have thought about it.
      Noreen


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • agp
      Hi Noreen How I, as a Slovak with not a drop of Croatian blood in me, ended up at a Croatian ethnic praish is a story in and of itself. I should point out a
      Message 2 of 11 , May 2, 2005
        Hi Noreen

        How I, as a Slovak with not a drop of Croatian blood in me, ended up at a
        Croatian ethnic praish is a story in and of itself.

        I should point out a bit of pre-history. My grandpap Jan Pavuk, from
        Kurov, was Greek Catholic. My grandmum, Katerina Sestokova, from Malcov,
        was Roman Catholic. Malcov and Kurov are somewhat close to each other, but
        whether they knew each other there is unknown. This is all very near the
        Polish border, so much so that if you look out the windows on the north
        side of my grandpap's house you are looking at Poland! (Well, its not that
        close, but you get the idea)

        Anyway, grandmum was truly a sainted woman. Family history says that she
        saw an apparition of the Blessed Mother callin her home before she passed
        away back in 1964.

        When my grandpap wanted to marry her, he went to the Greek Catholic
        parish. He was told no by the pastor. So he said 'go to hell' and became a
        Roman Catholic and ended up at St Florin's in United.

        Once again, this is the stuff of legend. Is it true? Who knows. But it is
        in character for Jan Pavuk!

        Back in 1988 I moved to Millvale PA. The largest parish in town was St
        Anthony. This had been an ethnic German parish. Somehow, I never felt
        quite right here. One day in 1991 or so I asked my neighbor about the
        church on the hill. She said that it was St Nicholas. So I went there, and
        heard Father Romildo Hrboka preach. He is from Croatia, and his words
        combined with his accent brought back a flood of memories of my grandpap
        and the strong Slavic morality he instilled in me. I was captivated, and
        that same day approached Father Romildo about joining up. He said 'Why
        sure. Just send to me your name.'

        Now, our church building is adorned with a set of mural painted by Maxo
        Vanka. These murals tellthe story of the immigrant experience, and relate
        it to the strength of Croatian Catholicism, devotion to Mary, the way the
        people have struggled in time of war, and the importance of our mothers in
        Slavic hsitory.

        A year later I became a lector there.

        Life went on and I became a part of the parish family. One day, a young
        priest from Croatia showed up, Father Franjo Doljanin. Next thing you
        know, I'm helping him with his computer. Father Romildo retired, and our
        present pastor Father Gabriel Badurina showed up. All of these priests
        have been from Croatia. Next thing you know, I'm helping with the parish
        mailing list and other computer stuff. Then I became a eucharistic
        minister. Then I became a cantor. Before you know it, I'm doing all manner
        of little things for Father, and ended up heading the Pastoral Council.
        Father has said that I am his right-hand man, but I'm just your average
        Josip, doing whatever the church needs me to do.

        I have been to Zagreb and actually stayed with Father Gabriel's family
        there.

        Oh -- then last year, for the first time ever, I actually sang in
        Croatian!

        I sang the hymn Lord When You Came to The Seashore, Krist na Z^alu.

        Hmmm...I think I've become an adopted Croat!

        BTW -- does anyone have Slovak lyrics for Lord When You Came to The
        Seashore? I'd sure love to surprise Father with that!

        Tony Pavick
      • krejc@aol.com
        These murals tellthe story of the immigrant experience, and relate it to the strength of Croatian Catholicism, devotion to Mary, the way the people have
        Message 3 of 11 , May 3, 2005
          These murals tellthe story of the immigrant experience, and relate
          it to the strength of Croatian Catholicism, devotion to Mary, the way the
          people have struggled in time of war, and the importance of our mothers in
          Slavic hsitory.


          Tony,
          If anyone has been in the past to the Jankola Library in Danville,
          Pennsylvania, or plans to go in the future, there is a very beautiful church on the
          grounds and the stained glass windows depict the Tatra Mountains and other
          immigrant treasure memories. I went there in the mid 1990's and am still trying to
          get the time to go again.
          Noreen


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • gergely
          The Slovak Club in Bradenville (Snydertown) PA has three murals, one really nice one depicting a Slovak city with the Tatras in the background. The two others
          Message 4 of 11 , May 3, 2005
            The Slovak Club in Bradenville (Snydertown) PA has three murals, one really
            nice one depicting a Slovak city with the Tatras in the background. The two
            others show a local hunting scene, and Snydertown early in the 20th century.
            They were painted in the 60s or early 70s, and every time I go there and ask
            about them, no one seems to know anything about them. Of course the main
            theme of the usual patrons of the club is NOT Slovak history, rather
            drinking shots and a beer, and punch boards.

            Jack Gergely
            Newport News

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of krejc@...
            Sent: Tuesday, May 03, 2005 7:19 AM
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak Roman Catholic Prayer meets Rusyn
            Prayer


            These murals tellthe story of the immigrant experience, and relate
            it to the strength of Croatian Catholicism, devotion to Mary, the way the
            people have struggled in time of war, and the importance of our mothers in
            Slavic hsitory.


            Tony,
            If anyone has been in the past to the Jankola Library in Danville,
            Pennsylvania, or plans to go in the future, there is a very beautiful church
            on the
            grounds and the stained glass windows depict the Tatra Mountains and other
            immigrant treasure memories. I went there in the mid 1990's and am still
            trying to
            get the time to go again.
            Noreen


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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          • krejc@aol.com
            In a message dated 5/3/05 8:29:45 AM Eastern Daylight Time, gergely@visi.net writes: Of course the main theme of the usual patrons of the club is NOT Slovak
            Message 5 of 11 , May 3, 2005
              In a message dated 5/3/05 8:29:45 AM Eastern Daylight Time, gergely@...
              writes:
              Of course the main
              theme of the usual patrons of the club is NOT Slovak history, rather
              drinking shots and a beer, and punch boards.
              Hi Ed,
              Well, i guess, of course, this is tradition too, :o)
              Noreen
              p.s. what exactly are punch boards? darts?


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Dr. Joe Q
              Punch board is a game of chance , there is a thick (about 1/2 to 5/8 inche) piece of cardboard about 4 x 6 inches with rows of holes covered with thin paper.
              Message 6 of 11 , May 4, 2005
                Punch board is a "game of chance", there is a thick
                (about 1/2 to 5/8 inche) piece of cardboard about 4 x
                6 inches with rows of holes covered with thin paper.
                In each hole (about 1/8" in diameter) is a small
                rolled piece of paper with a number on it. You pay
                something like 25 cents and punch a strip of paper.
                You get the number of quarters back that on the paper.
                Of course there are not many winning papers and the
                house always makes money because there is not a 100%
                payback.

                Veryt exciting especially after a couple of shots and
                beers because the the hand eye coordination required.
                The game is common at various clubs such as VFW,
                American Legion, etc. A heavy odor of cigars,
                cigarettes, etc. enhances the experience along with
                wet table tops and torn vinyl stools and chair seats.

                Get the idea?

                (Darts is too dangerous after shots and beers!!)

                :-)

                Dr. "Q"

                --- krejc@... wrote:
                > In a message dated 5/3/05 8:29:45 AM Eastern
                > Daylight Time, gergely@...
                > writes:
                > Of course the main
                > theme of the usual patrons of the club is NOT Slovak
                > history, rather
                > drinking shots and a beer, and punch boards.
                > Hi Ed,
                > Well, i guess, of course, this is tradition too, :o)
                > Noreen
                > p.s. what exactly are punch boards? darts?

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              • Caye Caswick
                Pretty cool, here in the Midwest they play Shake-a-Day -- it s a heavy rubber cup with dice in it -- 5 I think -- and basically it s sort of like poker -- the
                Message 7 of 11 , May 4, 2005
                  Pretty cool, here in the Midwest they play Shake-a-Day
                  -- it's a heavy rubber cup with dice in it -- 5 I
                  think -- and basically it's sort of like poker -- the
                  better your roll, the more likely you are to get a
                  free drink -- ditto for the wet tabletops and torn
                  vinyl -- but you forgot the duct tape used to
                  "attempt" to repair the rips.

                  Darts are pretty popular here -- but they put the
                  board back by the bathrooms and use those plastic
                  tipped darts -- luckily most of the members wear old
                  "safety"-type glasses anyhow, so not a lot of damage.


                  Caye




                  --- "Dr. Joe Q" <doctor_jq@...> wrote:
                  > Punch board is a "game of chance", there is a thick
                  > (about 1/2 to 5/8 inche) piece of cardboard about 4
                  > x
                  > 6 inches with rows of holes covered with thin paper.
                  >
                  > In each hole (about 1/8" in diameter) is a small
                  > rolled piece of paper with a number on it. You pay
                  > something like 25 cents and punch a strip of paper.
                  > You get the number of quarters back that on the
                  > paper.
                  > Of course there are not many winning papers and the
                  > house always makes money because there is not a 100%
                  > payback.
                  >
                  > Veryt exciting especially after a couple of shots
                  > and
                  > beers because the the hand eye coordination
                  > required.
                  > The game is common at various clubs such as VFW,
                  > American Legion, etc. A heavy odor of cigars,
                  > cigarettes, etc. enhances the experience along with
                  > wet table tops and torn vinyl stools and chair
                  > seats.
                  >
                  > Get the idea?
                  >
                  > (Darts is too dangerous after shots and beers!!)
                  >
                  > :-)
                  >
                  > Dr. "Q"
                  >
                  > --- krejc@... wrote:
                  > > In a message dated 5/3/05 8:29:45 AM Eastern
                  > > Daylight Time, gergely@...
                  > > writes:
                  > > Of course the main
                  > > theme of the usual patrons of the club is NOT
                  > Slovak
                  > > history, rather
                  > > drinking shots and a beer, and punch boards.
                  > > Hi Ed,
                  > > Well, i guess, of course, this is tradition too,
                  > :o)
                  > > Noreen
                  > > p.s. what exactly are punch boards? darts?
                  >
                  > __________________________________________________
                  > Do You Yahoo!?
                  > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                  > protection around
                  > http://mail.yahoo.com
                  >



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                • krejc@aol.com
                  Message 8 of 11 , May 6, 2005
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