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Re: [Slovak-World] Slovakia - search and rescue

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  • Martin Votruba
    ... I m not sure who you mean by we, Dave, but Colorado, for example, doesn t charge for mountain search and rescue, nor does Alaska, I believe (Ron?). On
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 1 7:28 AM
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      > It looks like Slovakia is starting to get more Americanized.
      > We are also charging for rescues.

      I'm not sure who you mean by "we," Dave, but Colorado, for example,
      doesn't charge for mountain search and rescue, nor does Alaska, I
      believe (Ron?). On the other hand, Slovak rescue teams have been
      charging for mountain search and rescue when the person was off a
      marked trail in the national parks unless the s/he was a member of a
      registered rock climbers' club.


      Martin

      votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
    • amiak27
      You are right, Martin. We also do not charge for mountain rescue in Alaska, and I believe charging is almost non-existent in the US. It is quite common in
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 1 6:18 PM
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        You are right, Martin. We also do not charge for mountain rescue in
        Alaska, and I believe charging is almost non-existent in the US. It
        is quite common in Europe to have insurance for mountain rescue or
        foreign medical treatment in the Alps. A helicopter rescue can be
        quite expensive. I believe it is $1500 just to have the helicopter
        take off in Alaska. All in round numbers. I am part of the volunteer
        rescue system we have up here and have had the chance to play victim
        in one of our scenarios, this a 'back-to-nature' family who hiked off
        in the mountains with the wedding party and the priest and didn't come
        back. It was interesting to listen in on the efforts to locate us and
        then impressive to observe the professionalism and skills of the
        rescuers.

        While I favor charging for rescue - it can put the rescuer in varying
        degrees of danger - I hear reports from Europe that with insurance
        there is a greater tendency to call on rescue when simply exhausted or
        calling it quits rather than climb out. So it is a tough nut to
        crack. Darwin's law is not quick enough to protect us from all stupid
        people. Unlucky ones it is easier to sympathize with!


        Ron

        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Martin Votruba <votrubam@y...>
        wrote:
        > > It looks like Slovakia is starting to get more Americanized.
        > > We are also charging for rescues.
        >
        > I'm not sure who you mean by "we," Dave, but Colorado, for example,
        > doesn't charge for mountain search and rescue, nor does Alaska, I
        > believe (Ron?). On the other hand, Slovak rescue teams have been
        > charging for mountain search and rescue when the person was off a
        > marked trail in the national parks unless the s/he was a member of a
        > registered rock climbers' club.
        >
        >
        > Martin
        >
        > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
      • Martin Votruba
        ... Thank you for your comments, Ron, and I agree. In Slovakia, the rescue teams are salaried professionals -- government jobs. Most of the time, they sit
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 1 8:14 PM
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          > it is a tough nut to crack.

          Thank you for your comments, Ron, and I agree. In Slovakia, the
          rescue teams are salaried professionals -- government jobs. Most of
          the time, they sit around in their offices waiting. I calculated the
          meager data they volunteered to reveal last year, and it came down to
          one (team) rescue a week for each of them in the High Tatras. That
          includes anything -- from exhaustion or a twisted ankle on a marked
          trail through a climber hanging on a rope. They very often use a
          helicopter these days. Looking for lost hikers is exceptionally
          rare. It's almost always reported accidents.


          Martin

          votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
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