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Communist informers

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  • Martin Votruba
    Bratislava has finished publishing the lists of people registered as informers by the former communist secret police. Below is a current report. Martin
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 29, 2005
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      Bratislava has finished publishing the lists of people registered as
      informers by the former communist secret police. Below is a current
      report.


      Martin

      votruba "at" pitt "dot "edu

      x x x


      Most Slovaks want former communist-era secret service agents still in
      leading public positions to leave their posts, a poll released
      Tuesday showed.

      82% of Slovaks think people registered as agents in recently released
      files should quit public life, according to a survey by the MVK
      agency carried out for the daily Sme.

      Fewer than 12% said they did not think that was needed, and 6% of
      respondents had no opinion.

      The agency interviewed 1,200 people in late February. No margin of
      error was given.

      Over the past few months, a government institute has published files
      maintained by the country's former secret police. These files, dating
      back to the 1950s, list names of former communist secret police
      agents as well as citizens who were persecuted in Slovakia under
      communism, which ended here in 1989.

      While some officials registered as agents have given up their posts,
      including former state secretary of the Ministry of Construction and
      Regional Development Jan Hurny, most have given no indication they
      are willing to do so.

      Three current lawmakers in the Slovak parliament have been registered
      as agents, according to these files. None have said they would give
      up their seats in the 150-member parliament.

      Apart from the political scene, the files caused a major stir in
      Slovakia's churches. Some leaders and priests, including Roman
      Catholic archbishop Jan Sokol, were listed as secret service agents.
      Sokol denies the allegation.

      The leader of the second-largest church in Slovakia, the general
      bishop of the Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession Julius
      Filo, also was listed as an agent. He also denies the allegation.
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