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Steel mills

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  • LHBrigham
    Gil and David, Thanks for the insightful comments about US steel mills. While I was a student at a tech school in Binghamton, NY we took a trip to Bethlehem
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 22, 2005
      Gil and David,

      Thanks for the insightful comments about US steel mills.

      While I was a student at a tech school in Binghamton, NY we took a trip
      to Bethlehem and visited the steel mill. One memorable part of the trip
      was a visit to the very pricey board room. We also watched the sparks
      fly as they made steel in the furnaces. The contrast between the ultra
      clean board room and the hot, dusty, black mill represented the divide
      between management and labor.

      Even though the mill was grim, it probably was a far better place to
      work than in the coal mines that fed it. And, steel mills paid a lot
      more than the shoe factories where immigrants labored a few miles north
      in New York State.

      Lowell
    • Gil Kubancsek
      Thanks Lowell for your feedback. This site provides a lot of interesting information and photographs of the Kosice plant in Slovakia.:
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 23, 2005
        Thanks Lowell for your feedback.

        This site provides a lot of interesting information and photographs of the Kosice plant in Slovakia.: http://www.ussteelkosice.sk/corpinfo/corpi-e.htm

        It appears from the photographs to be a much cleaner and brighter working environment than the Homestead Plant where I worked many years ago.

        Gil


        LHBrigham <LHBrigham@...> wrote:
        Gil and David,

        Thanks for the insightful comments about US steel mills.

        While I was a student at a tech school in Binghamton, NY we took a trip
        to Bethlehem and visited the steel mill. One memorable part of the trip
        was a visit to the very pricey board room. We also watched the sparks
        fly as they made steel in the furnaces. The contrast between the ultra
        clean board room and the hot, dusty, black mill represented the divide
        between management and labor.

        Even though the mill was grim, it probably was a far better place to
        work than in the coal mines that fed it. And, steel mills paid a lot
        more than the shoe factories where immigrants labored a few miles north
        in New York State.

        Lowell


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      • krejc@aol.com
        Gil, In reading the whole site on the Kosice Steel Plant, the summer internship from high schools stress that the students must speak English, write a resume
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 23, 2005
          Gil,
          In reading the whole site on the Kosice Steel Plant, the summer internship
          from high schools stress that the students must speak English, write a resume in
          both Slovak and English. This will create a need for English-speaking
          teachers.
          Noreen


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • LHBrigham
          Noreen, I have a half dozen young cousins living in Slovakia and they all took (some are taking) English in elementary and high school. I also have one who
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 23, 2005
            Noreen,

            I have a half dozen young cousins living in Slovakia and they all took
            (some are taking) English in elementary and high school. I also have
            one who was a school teacher who taught English. Two of them worked as
            au pairs (sp?) in England. One also worked in a restaurant in England.
            This effort is designed to improve their English skills. Two of the
            cousins obtained visas to work in the US so they could learn our
            language and customs.

            Two of the cousins listed in the above are now working at jobs requiring
            them to be fluent in English. One of them is working at a job requiring
            communication with people in many different countries and English is the
            common language. The other cousin is presently working to translate
            engineering documents written in Slovak to English. These documents are
            then sent to a Japanese company doing work in Slovakia. English is the
            common language between Slovakia and Japan!


            Lowell

            krejc@... wrote:

            >Gil,
            >In reading the whole site on the Kosice Steel Plant, the summer internship
            >from high schools stress that the students must speak English, write a resume in
            >both Slovak and English. This will create a need for English-speaking
            >teachers.
            >Noreen
            >
            >
            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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          • Scott T. Mikusko
            ... Yup, it s getting common. One of my cousins is doing basically the same thing; she s working in London while taking more language classes. She wants to
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 23, 2005
              On Wed, 23 Mar 2005, LHBrigham wrote:

              > Noreen,
              >
              > I have a half dozen young cousins living in Slovakia and they all took
              > (some are taking) English in elementary and high school. I also have
              > one who was a school teacher who taught English. Two of them worked as
              > au pairs (sp?) in England. One also worked in a restaurant in England.
              > This effort is designed to improve their English skills. Two of the
              > cousins obtained visas to work in the US so they could learn our
              > language and customs.

              Yup, it's getting common. One of my cousins is doing basically the same
              thing; she's working in London while taking more language classes. She
              wants to improve her English, get proper certification to be an
              au-pair/nanny, and come work in the States.

              > Two of the cousins listed in the above are now working at jobs requiring
              > them to be fluent in English. One of them is working at a job requiring
              > communication with people in many different countries and English is the
              > common language. The other cousin is presently working to translate
              > engineering documents written in Slovak to English. These documents are
              > then sent to a Japanese company doing work in Slovakia. English is the
              > common language between Slovakia and Japan!

              Hehheh yes. My other cousins work for a Japanese plant near Prievidza,
              and the office language is English. So you get Slovaks and Japanese in
              their heavily accented English trying to understand eachother. Leads to
              fun times... :)

              At least they are not translating Japanese manuals done in English into
              Slovak, because some Japanese documents translated can be a real hoot.
              I've run across some hilarious word choices by Japenese tech writers.

              When I was on a visit to Slovakia, my cousins' friends wanted to kidnap me
              in order to translate their tech gadgets' manuals from English to Slovak.
              There's good opportunities for some in translations in tech writing. Pity
              foreign language requirements are so lax over here; some students could
              make a career out that! :)

              -Scott
            • krejc@aol.com
              In a message dated 3/24/05 12:15:55 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... Dear Lowell and Scott, I did not realize that English was spoken that widely. I would have
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 24, 2005
                In a message dated 3/24/05 12:15:55 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                LHBrigham@... writes:

                > have a half dozen young cousins living in Slovakia and they all took
                > (some are taking) English in elementary and high school

                Dear Lowell and Scott,
                I did not realize that English was spoken that widely. I would have thought
                that Russian, German or French would have been more commonly spoken in Eastern
                Europe as a second language and that in the case of the Kosice steel mill,
                that the management would have been required to know Slovak, especially the legal
                team.
                I hope that this steel plant will provide opportunities to the people who
                live in the Kosice area to advance financially. The end of the Communistic
                system has been hard on this part of the country and it seems that some of the
                people still wish that the guarantees of a Communistic system still existed and
                that is very understandable. Change is hard and they have undergone some major
                changes.
                Besides the Kosice steel mill, Volkswagen, and Whirlpool, what other
                industries are starting up business in Slovakia? I am nothing short of amazed at how
                Slovakia is taking off on a run. Is Russia investing in Slovakia?
                Lowell, your cousins who are learning English in elementary school are lucky
                to be starting at a young age. I hope that our children on this side of the
                ocean will get the opportunity to be offered a wide variety of second language
                choices in elementary school someday, rather than in high school and college.
                The world is shrinking at a quick pace and there are a lot more languages
                out there than just Spanish.
                Noreen


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • William F Brna
                I believe the general manager of US Steel s Clairton works was formerly a manager in Kos~ice. Bill Brna
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 24, 2005
                  I believe the general manager of US Steel's Clairton works was formerly a
                  manager in Kos~ice.

                  Bill Brna

                  On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 05:51:42 EST krejc@... writes:
                  >
                  > In a message dated 3/24/05 12:15:55 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                  > LHBrigham@... writes:
                  >
                  > > have a half dozen young cousins living in Slovakia and they all
                  > took
                  > > (some are taking) English in elementary and high school
                  >
                  > Dear Lowell and Scott,
                  > I did not realize that English was spoken that widely. I would have
                  > thought
                  > that Russian, German or French would have been more commonly spoken
                  > in Eastern
                  > Europe as a second language and that in the case of the Kosice steel
                  > mill,
                  > that the management would have been required to know Slovak,
                  > especially the legal
                  > team.
                  > I hope that this steel plant will provide opportunities to the
                  > people who
                  > live in the Kosice area to advance financially. The end of the
                  > Communistic
                  > system has been hard on this part of the country and it seems that
                  > some of the
                  > people still wish that the guarantees of a Communistic system still
                  > existed and
                  > that is very understandable. Change is hard and they have undergone
                  > some major
                  > changes.
                  > Besides the Kosice steel mill, Volkswagen, and Whirlpool, what other
                  >
                  > industries are starting up business in Slovakia? I am nothing short
                  > of amazed at how
                  > Slovakia is taking off on a run. Is Russia investing in Slovakia?
                  >
                  > Lowell, your cousins who are learning English in elementary school
                  > are lucky
                  > to be starting at a young age. I hope that our children on this
                  > side of the
                  > ocean will get the opportunity to be offered a wide variety of
                  > second language
                  > choices in elementary school someday, rather than in high school and
                  > college.
                  > The world is shrinking at a quick pace and there are a lot more
                  > languages
                  > out there than just Spanish.
                  > Noreen
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Scott T. Mikusko
                  ... Englsi is more common in the under-30 crowd, especially the current students. Russian is common in the 30-50 crowd, and the old folks know a bit of German.
                  Message 8 of 9 , Mar 24, 2005
                    On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 krejc@... wrote:

                    >
                    > In a message dated 3/24/05 12:15:55 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                    > LHBrigham@... writes:
                    >
                    > > have a half dozen young cousins living in Slovakia and they all took
                    > > (some are taking) English in elementary and high school
                    >
                    > Dear Lowell and Scott,
                    > I did not realize that English was spoken that widely. I would have thought
                    > that Russian, German or French would have been more commonly spoken in Eastern
                    > Europe as a second language and that in the case of the Kosice steel mill,
                    > that the management would have been required to know Slovak, especially the legal
                    > team.

                    Englsi is more common in the under-30 crowd, especially the current
                    students. Russian is common in the 30-50 crowd, and the old folks know a
                    bit of German. The ages illustrate the historical times of Slovakia.
                    Hungarian really seemed to have just stayed put in the sourthen area. I
                    didn't run across any Hungarian speakers in the west or central areas.

                    > The world is shrinking at a quick pace and there are a lot more languages
                    > out there than just Spanish.
                    > Noreen

                    True, but Spanish is a logical and useful choice for North Americans. In
                    my other life, if I hadn't chosen science and technology as a career, I
                    would like to have been an interpretor, studying Slavic and Germanic
                    languages. The business and diplomatic opportunities the past 15 years
                    would have been good for that.

                    If you want to get ahead in the future, study Mandarin or some Southeast
                    Asian tongues.

                    -S
                  • Gil Kubancsek
                    Noreen, Several Korean companies are very interested in building facilities in Slovakia. Samsung is building a chip production plant and KIA Motors is
                    Message 9 of 9 , Mar 24, 2005
                      Noreen,

                      Several Korean companies are very interested in building facilities in Slovakia. Samsung is building a chip production plant and KIA Motors is planning to build an assembly plant. In addition Hyundai is considering an auto assembly plant.

                      It appears that persons fluent in English, Korean and Slovak will be in great demand. Its my understanding that these Korean firms are actively looking for Slovak speakers and writers among the students at the universities in Korea. Most Korean students already speak and write English.

                      Gil


                      krejc@... wrote:
                      In a message dated 3/24/05 12:15:55 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                      LHBrigham@... writes:

                      > have a half dozen young cousins living in Slovakia and they all took
                      > (some are taking) English in elementary and high school

                      Dear Lowell and Scott,
                      I did not realize that English was spoken that widely. I would have thought
                      that Russian, German or French would have been more commonly spoken in Eastern
                      Europe as a second language and that in the case of the Kosice steel mill,
                      that the management would have been required to know Slovak, especially the legal
                      team.
                      I hope that this steel plant will provide opportunities to the people who
                      live in the Kosice area to advance financially. The end of the Communistic
                      system has been hard on this part of the country and it seems that some of the
                      people still wish that the guarantees of a Communistic system still existed and
                      that is very understandable. Change is hard and they have undergone some major
                      changes.
                      Besides the Kosice steel mill, Volkswagen, and Whirlpool, what other
                      industries are starting up business in Slovakia? I am nothing short of amazed at how
                      Slovakia is taking off on a run. Is Russia investing in Slovakia?
                      Lowell, your cousins who are learning English in elementary school are lucky
                      to be starting at a young age. I hope that our children on this side of the
                      ocean will get the opportunity to be offered a wide variety of second language
                      choices in elementary school someday, rather than in high school and college.
                      The world is shrinking at a quick pace and there are a lot more languages
                      out there than just Spanish.
                      Noreen


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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