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RE: [Slovak-World] Dialects

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  • helene cincebeaux
    ... JOE YOU GAVE A COPY TO ME - I RAN ACROSS IT THE OTHER DAY WHILE WORKING ON THE SPRING SLOVAKIA HELENE __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!?
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 1, 2005
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      --- "Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)"
      <JArmata@...> wrote:

      > You think I remember where I put that drawing?!
      > It's not in my
      > linguistics or Slovak files, which is where it ought
      > to be. I'll stop
      > by the library this week and see if I can find the
      > book again.
      >
      JOE YOU GAVE A COPY TO ME - I RAN ACROSS IT THE
      OTHER DAY WHILE WORKING ON THE SPRING SLOVAKIA

      HELENE



      __________________________________
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    • Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)
      I found the book the map was based on. It s from the Atlas Slovenskeho Jazyka, Vol. I - Cast Prva - Mapy. Published 1968 by Slov. Akad. Vied in Bratislava.
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 9, 2005
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        I found the book the map was based on. It's from the Atlas
        Slovenskeho Jazyka, Vol. I - Cast Prva - Mapy. Published 1968 by
        Slov. Akad. Vied in Bratislava. Editor in Chief was Jozef Solc. This
        is Map #4 in the volume, one of four introductory maps showing
        geography, political divisions, towns & villages for orientation, and
        dialect divisions. The publication consists of four (?) hefty
        oversized volumes of maps showing the usage of different variations of
        dialect words, and accompanying text volumes that go with the maps.

        Joe


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Helen Fedor [mailto:hfed@...]
        Sent: Sunday, February 27, 2005 8:28 AM
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Dialects



        This is more detailed than the one at the beginning of vol.2. The
        only
        thing the other map has over this one is that it has the names of
        towns
        and cities, making it easier to get oriented. In which volume is this
        one?

        Helen



        Helen Fedor
        European Division
        Library of Congress
        10 E. First St., S.E.
        Washington, D.C. 20540-4830
        tel. (202) 707-3704
        fax (202) 707-8482
        <hfed@...>
        >>> JArmata@... 02/26/05 3:42 PM >>>




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      • William
        My mother was born in Krasna Horka and my father in Liesek, both in Orava. We also used papat for to eat , hejz~e for yes , s~umna for pretty ,
        Message 3 of 16 , Apr 20, 2011
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          My mother was born in Krasna Horka and my father in Liesek, both in
          Orava. We also used "papat'" for " to eat", "hejz~e" for " yes",
          "s~umna" for "pretty", "vravit" for "to speak". We were not aware that
          these words were dialect. That's simply the way we spoke. When I
          visited my relatives in Slovakia, I found that these same words were
          still being used. I'm sure that there are many other words that I was
          familiar with that would be considered dialect, but I did not have any
          trouble having Slovaks in and around Bratislava understanding what I had
          to say. I remember one evening we were sitting around the table and the
          word "ano" came up frequently. Finally, I said, "Nie ano, hejz~e!". Of
          course, I adopted the use of "ano"in future conversations.

          William F. Brna
        • votrubam
          ... There s a difference. Only the first two arrived in the 20th century, while the verb _papat_, also _papkat_ is old. It is a word used when talking to
          Message 4 of 16 , Apr 20, 2011
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            > The use of the greeting "ahoj [ah-hoee]" and the European
            > "c~au", [chow], and 'papat [pah-paht], (for eat)

            There's a difference. Only the first two arrived in the 20th century, while the verb _papat_, also _papkat_ is old. It is a word used when talking to babies, unexpected among adults, it ends up being quite expressive then (cutesy, funny, conceited, etc.).


            > word I heard more in the east is "s~umne"

            Yes, Helene, that's an East Slovak word, not common elsewhere.


            > "hen to"

            That's common all over Slovakia. It's a colloquial version of "the one/thing over there." It's a combination of hen- and the neuter pronoun _to_ in this instance. The colloquial hen- works with other pronouns too, e.g., henten, henti, etc. (e.g., Vidis hentu horu? "Can you see the mountain over there?") and also with tam, "there": hentam, "over there."


            > what sounded like Zetzi for deti.

            Indeed, Helene, they said [dzetsi]. Some South-West Slovak and all East Slovak dialects pronounce the "soft" (palatal) -t~- as [ts] and the "soft" (palatal) -d~- as [dz]. That's one of the most recognizable East Slovak features for other Slovaks.


            Martin
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