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Re: Votrubova Chata

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  • amiak27
    The three photos are loaded at the Photos part of the http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World site under Votruba Hut . I will take the photos down in a
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 1 7:43 PM
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      The three photos are loaded at the Photos part of the
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World
      site under "Votruba Hut". I will take the photos down in a few
      weeks. They are a beautiful example of a traditional hut in the
      European mountains. It is a nice look back in time.

      It was a surprise to run across the tidbit of history. Again,
      thanks for the history, Martin. It sure beats a one-liner in some
      general history book!

      Ron
    • sandman6294
      ... What a difference about 15 degrees in latitude (49 vs 35) makes. I ve been living at 1675 meters for 43 years and we don t have mountain brigades and
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 1 10:07 PM
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        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "amiak27" <rmat@p...> wrote:
        >
        > The three photos are loaded at the Photos part of the
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World
        > site under "Votruba Hut". I will take the photos down in a few
        > weeks. They are a beautiful example of a traditional hut in the
        > European mountains. It is a nice look back in time.

        What a difference about 15 degrees in latitude (49 vs 35) makes.
        I've been living at 1675 meters for 43 years and we don't have
        mountain brigades and skiing here. By the way, anyone know what the
        difference between "chata" and "chyz^a" is?

        RU
      • Helen Fedor
        Chata is a hut, while chyz~a is a cottage. My parents never referred to their home in the village as anything other than nas~a chyz~a . Helen ... What a
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 2 6:01 AM
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          "Chata" is a hut, while "chyz~a" is a cottage. My parents never
          referred to their home in the village as anything other than "nas~a
          chyz~a".

          Helen



          >>> sandman6294@... 03/02/05 1:07 AM >>>

          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "amiak27" <rmat@p...> wrote:
          >
          > The three photos are loaded at the Photos part of the
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World
          > site under "Votruba Hut". I will take the photos down in a few
          > weeks. They are a beautiful example of a traditional hut in the
          > European mountains. It is a nice look back in time.

          What a difference about 15 degrees in latitude (49 vs 35) makes.
          I've been living at 1675 meters for 43 years and we don't have
          mountain brigades and skiing here. By the way, anyone know what the
          difference between "chata" and "chyz^a" is?

          RU





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        • Martin Votruba
          Thank you, Ron, for the information and for the great photos. It s interesting that the German text translates the Predne Kopske sedlo in the Slovak text you
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 2 6:57 AM
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            Thank you, Ron, for the information and for the great photos. It's
            interesting that the German text translates the Predne Kopske sedlo
            in the Slovak text you posted as "White Saddle." It indeed is above
            White Lake (Tarn) where the newer hut was built (it's not there any
            more, either), but the mountain pass hasn't been called that in
            Slovak.

            > difference between "chata" and "chyz^a"

            As Helen said, chyza is a traditional word for a small house. It was
            also used to mean "a room." Chata is more recent, from the German
            Hu"tte. It only means a mountain chalet/hut, or a summer
            cottage/house today. But I recall it from at least one poem from the
            19th century in the sense of "a house," although it could have been
            used because of the rhyme.


            Martin

            votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
          • sandman6294
            ... Thanks Helen. That was the term my parents also used. For some reason I got the impression it was a synonym for hut and chata was a cottage. I wasn t
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 2 9:20 AM
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              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@l...> wrote:
              > "Chata" is a hut, while "chyz~a" is a cottage. My parents never
              > referred to their home in the village as anything other than "nas~a
              > chyz~a".
              >
              > Helen

              Thanks Helen. That was the term my parents also used. For some
              reason I got the impression it was a synonym for hut and "chata" was
              a cottage. I wasn't able to find "chyz^a" in my Slovak
              dictionaries. Is it an Eastern dialect or Rusyn term?

              RU
            • sandman6294
              ... was also used to mean a room. Chata is more recent, from the German Hu tte. It only means a mountain chalet/hut, or a summer cottage/house today.
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 2 9:35 AM
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                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Martin Votruba <votrubam@y...>
                wrote:
                > > difference between "chata" and "chyz^a"
                >
                > As Helen said, chyza is a traditional word for a small house. It
                was also used to mean "a room." Chata is more recent, from the
                German Hu"tte. It only means a mountain chalet/hut, or a summer
                cottage/house today.< But I recall it from at least one poem
                from...<

                Thanks Martin. As I mentioned to Helen, I couldn't find chyz^a in
                the dictionaries that I have access to. I had heard of "dacha" the
                Russian term for summer home or cottage but not "chata". My first
                encounter with "chata" was when I visited my cousin in Prague. They
                have a chata in the countryside outside Prague. I thought it was a
                Czech term.

                RU
              • Martin Votruba
                ... It is (was) quite common all over, RU, and in other Slavic languages, too. But it has an old-fashioned ring to it today, so that s why a shorter
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 2 10:24 AM
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                  > to find "chyz^a" in my Slovak dictionaries.
                  > Is it an Eastern dialect or Rusyn term?

                  It is (was) quite common all over, RU, and in other Slavic languages,
                  too. But it has an old-fashioned ring to it today, so that's why a
                  shorter dictionary might not include it. Here's part of a song (the
                  words _zochabit_ and _skarat_ are typical of East Slovak; na Kriza is
                  Sept. 14):

                  Zochabil ma frajer na sameho kriza,
                  bodaj mu zhorela do jesene chyza.
                  Do jesene chyza, do jari stodola,
                  nechze ho skaraju tieto moje slova.

                  "My boyfriend ditched me on 'would-you-believe-it' Holy Cross Day;
                  let his cottage all burn down by fall. His cottage by fall, his barn
                  by spring; let these words of mine curse him."


                  Martin

                  votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                • Helen Fedor
                  It s Slovak, but not much used, I guess. I looked in a smallish (pocket-ish) dictionary and a large Slovak-Eng. dictionary and found only chyz~na
                  Message 8 of 13 , Mar 2 10:30 AM
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                    It's Slovak, but not much used, I guess. I looked in a smallish
                    (pocket-ish) dictionary and a large Slovak-Eng. dictionary and found
                    only "chyz~na" (chambermaid), but found "chyz~a" in the Slovak-Slovak
                    dictionary put out by the Slovak Academy of Sciences.

                    Helen



                    >>> sandman6294@... 03/02/05 12:20 PM >>>

                    --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@l...> wrote:
                    > "Chata" is a hut, while "chyz~a" is a cottage. My parents never
                    > referred to their home in the village as anything other than "nas~a
                    > chyz~a".
                    >
                    > Helen

                    Thanks Helen. That was the term my parents also used. For some
                    reason I got the impression it was a synonym for hut and "chata" was
                    a cottage. I wasn't able to find "chyz^a" in my Slovak
                    dictionaries. Is it an Eastern dialect or Rusyn term?

                    RU




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                  • Caye Caswick
                    I cannot believe those photos could ever be confused with a hut -- I d say they look like Swiss skiing chalets -- or lodges -- but hut -- I just don t get
                    Message 9 of 13 , Mar 2 10:39 AM
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                      I cannot believe those photos could ever be confused
                      with a 'hut' -- I'd say they look like Swiss skiing
                      chalets -- or lodges -- but 'hut' -- I just don't get
                      how hut applies to construction/architecture that
                      nice.


                      Caye



                      --- sandman6294 <sandman6294@...> wrote:

                      >
                      > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "amiak27"
                      > <rmat@p...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > The three photos are loaded at the Photos part of
                      > the
                      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World
                      > > site under "Votruba Hut". I will take the photos
                      > down in a few
                      > > weeks. They are a beautiful example of a
                      > traditional hut in the
                      > > European mountains. It is a nice look back in
                      > time.
                      >
                      > What a difference about 15 degrees in latitude (49
                      > vs 35) makes.
                      > I've been living at 1675 meters for 43 years and we
                      > don't have
                      > mountain brigades and skiing here. By the way,
                      > anyone know what the
                      > difference between "chata" and "chyz^a" is?
                      >
                      > RU
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >





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                    • amiak27
                      Caye, The term simply has an entirely different meaning than we are accustomed to applying with our English version of hut . In Alaska the huts I have
                      Message 10 of 13 , Mar 2 6:31 PM
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                        Caye,

                        The term simply has an entirely different meaning than we are
                        accustomed to applying with our English version of 'hut'. In Alaska
                        the huts I have encountered are huts as we understand them, sparse
                        frame construction well built to withstand wind and weather,
                        anchored with cables into the rocks. Lightweight because all
                        material has to be hauled in by man-sled, dog-sled, back or
                        airplane. Some are clad in thin aluminum newspaper print sheets
                        which are / were used once and salvaged or sold to poor mountaineers.

                        The huts I have experinced in Austria and Switzerland have ranged
                        from relatively simple buildings with cold running water to wash up
                        with and outhouses over the edge of the morraine to very large,
                        multi-story, multi-room ... hotels. There is no other English word
                        I can name, with hot showers and flush toilets. Both simple and
                        elaborate offer a bar and kitchen, bunks and blankets. You bring
                        your own sheets. My first time hiking hut to hut I started quite
                        nervously, because I had NEVER gone into the mountains to overnight
                        without being fully self-sufficient. There are some good tales to
                        tell, up in them thar mountains!

                        I wish I spoke Slovak to duplicate the experience in the Tatras!

                        Ron

                        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@y...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > I cannot believe those photos could ever be confused
                        > with a 'hut' -- I'd say they look like Swiss skiing
                        > chalets -- or lodges -- but 'hut' -- I just don't get
                        > how hut applies to construction/architecture that
                        > nice.
                        >
                        >
                        > Caye
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- sandman6294 <sandman6294@y...> wrote:
                        >
                        > >
                        > > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "amiak27"
                        > > <rmat@p...> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > The three photos are loaded at the Photos part of
                        > > the
                        > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World
                        > > > site under "Votruba Hut". I will take the photos
                        > > down in a few
                        > > > weeks. They are a beautiful example of a
                        > > traditional hut in the
                        > > > European mountains. It is a nice look back in
                        > > time.
                        > >
                        > > What a difference about 15 degrees in latitude (49
                        > > vs 35) makes.
                        > > I've been living at 1675 meters for 43 years and we
                        > > don't have
                        > > mountain brigades and skiing here. By the way,
                        > > anyone know what the
                        > > difference between "chata" and "chyz^a" is?
                        > >
                        > > RU
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
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