Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Ancient Slavs

Expand Messages
  • Martin Votruba
    ... There s general agreement on that, Helene (thank you and Joe for your kind words). Most accept that about 2,000 years ago the Slavs lived in the area of
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 27, 2005
      > where do you think the Slavs came from that settled in Slovakia?

      There's general agreement on that, Helene (thank you and Joe for your
      kind words). Most accept that about 2,000 years ago the Slavs lived
      in the area of today's Belarus, about 200 miles north-east of
      Slovakia, perhaps also in eastern Poland, western Ukraine.

      They were farmers, freshwater fishermen, and hunters.

      They called each other Slov-en, "a person (capable) of
      (comprehensible) words," people who were able to understand each
      other: slov-o = "word."

      By around the year 400, some of them had migrated south along the
      Black Sea and settled the area all the way to today's Bulgaria and
      central Greece. Others moved west (today's eastern Germany) and east
      (Russia).

      By around 500 they'd reached today's Slovakia, most, if not all from
      the south turning back north. They probably didn't cross the
      Carpathians directly, from the north. Rather, some would have passed
      through Silesia and the Moravian lowlands, others along the Black
      Sea. They probably reached the Danubian plains (today's Hungary)
      along those routes, and expanded north into Slovakia from there.

      It wasn't a single massive march (i.e., not like the Huns earlier, or
      the Ugrics later). It must have been a gradual expansion: a group of
      younger people would establish a new village a few dozen miles
      upstream, for example, the next generation would do the same. In
      other instances, larger groups of people must have covered longer
      distances in one stretch.

      So, by around 500-600, the Slavs were in much of Central Europe and
      to the south-east and east and north-east of it. (Thank you, Ron,
      for posting about the Austrian maps: I copied and used them after you
      mentioned them the first time.)

      There's a recent dissenting view. However, I wouldn't hold my breath
      for specialists to look into it.


      Martin

      votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.