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Slovak film series in Phg. (April)

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  • Martin Votruba
    ... showing at Pitt? I include the details below, Joyce. If it comes up garbled on your screen, let me know, please, and I ll redo it in ASCII. If anyone
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 26, 2005
      > Has there been any mention of when the Slovak films will start
      showing at Pitt?

      I include the details below, Joyce. If it comes up garbled on your
      screen, let me know, please, and I'll redo it in ASCII.

      If anyone wants the flyer in a better, printable form to display
      somewhere, e-mail me privately, please at: -- votruba "at" pitt "dot"
      edu -- (not at the 'coverup' address in the header of this post), and
      I'll send you its edited version as an attachemnt.

      Martin

      votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu

      x x x

      UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH
      SLOVAK STUDIES PROGRAM
      SLOVAK FILM SERIES 2005

      This will be a historic occasion, because the silent film Janosik
      made in 1921 used to be shown with great success in Slovak-American
      communities, including in Pittsburgh, through the 1950s, but was
      thought lost afterwards. With this presentation at the University of
      Pittsburgh, the first Slovak film Janosik is returning to Pittsburgh
      at a non-profit viewing after it was restored from two incomplete
      copies. There will be brief introductions and hadnouts.

      Sunday, April 3, 2 PM, ? Double feature, 1501 Posvar Hall (next to
      Hillman Library)
      Janosik (1h 8') ? historic, Slovak-American silent motion picture
      from 1921
      The series opens with Slovakia's first feature movie, the silent
      film Janosik, made in 1921 with Slovak-American capital by Jaroslav
      Jerry Siakel, who returned from his home in Chicago to his native
      central Slovakia to shoot the film on location with Slovak actors.
      Janosik I (1h 20')
      One of the most popular domestic movies in Slovakia, the film
      was partly shot on location in the picturesque, craggy valeys around
      the real Janosik's home village. It opens with young Janosik learning
      about the overlords' disregard for their subjects, and continues with
      him joining a band of merry mountain lads in his early adulthood.

      Sunday, April 10, 2 PM, (no film), 1501 Posvar Hall (next to Hillman
      Library)
      The Thomas Kukucka Memorial Lecture
      David Doellinger: Slovak Pilgrimages in the 1980s: A Challenge to
      Communist Power

      Sunday, April 17, 2 PM, 1501 Posvar Hall (next to Hillman Library)
      Janosik II (1h 30')
      Janosik I and II are one film in two parts made in 1963 by
      director Palo Bielik, who himself had starred in the leading role in
      another, earlier film about Janosik, which is not currently
      available. Both parts of Janosik I-II were among the biggest domestic
      blockbusters that the film studios in Bratislava produced.

      Sunday, April 24, 2 PM, 1501 Posvar Hall (next to Hillman Library)
      Jurko the Highwayman (1h 17')
      Jurko is an endearing nickame for boys called Juraj (George).
      Not a re-telling of the old legend, this film was made by Slovakia's
      premier cartoonist Viktor Kubal. It received top awards at two
      international festivals of films for children. It is particularly
      suitable as an introduction to the Slovak legend for not just adult
      but also young audiences, because there are no subtitles. The
      feature-length cartoon is silent with a soundtrack of Slovak music.

      JURAJ JANOSIK

      The central figure of the film series is Juraj Janosik, a highwayman
      from the village of Terchova in north-west Slovakia who was captured
      and hanged in 1713 at the age of only 25. His execution was quite
      common for brigand leaders: he was hung by a hook that was threaded
      through his left side. For about a hundred years after his death, he
      appeared in folk stories and market songs, which often gave him
      miraculous powers and credited him with a number of fanciful exploits.

      But when in the 19th century the Slovak Romantic poets learned from
      the publication of his trial proceedings in a popular calendar that
      he was executed although he robbed for barely over a year and did not
      take anyone's life, they began to see him as a hero of resistance
      against the injustices of the feudal past.

      Especially the poem The Death of Janosik (Smrt Janosikova) by Jan
      Botto published in 1862 became a hallmark of Slovak Romantic
      literature. Probably every Slovak recognizes its opening verse "A
      fire burns brightly on the Mountain of Kings..." (Hori, ohnik, hori,
      na Kralovej holi...) which is taught several times from grade through
      high school. A passage from the poem says:

      From the Tatras to the Danube, this whisper you hear:
      Take your taxes, you lords, but our vengeance is near.
      Take them, you wolves; you may repay with your lives!
      When you least expect it, there will flash out twelve knives:
      "Halt! A thousand thunderbolts!" -- ten of them jump out --
      "Give God your soul, and us your ducats!" they shout.
      Sabers above their heads, and pistols in their hands:
      "Give back, your Lordship, what you stole from Slovak lands!"
      From the Tatras to the Danube, the orphans sing:
      Oh, God, give this brigand all the luck you can bring!
      All the luck, God, that he needs, from morning till night,
      in the same measure that he sets injustice right.
      From his hat he pours ducats, enough and to spare,
      with yards of Red English for the poorest to wear.

      After that period, Janosik became not just a highwayman of folk
      stories who took from the rich and gave to the poor, but also an
      enormously popular hero portrayed by some writers, painters, and
      sculptors as a noble symbol of people's longing for freedom, and by
      others as an adventurous, charming friend of those in need.

      The Slovak Pittsburghers did not remain behind. The novel Janosik,
      the Young Master of Freedom: A Legend of Times Gone By was published
      in Slovak in Pittsburgh in 1893 under the pseudonym "Dobry Slovak."
      Another Slovak-written novel Janosik, the Captain of Mountain Lads:
      His Tumultuous Life and Horrific Death by Slovak-American Gustav
      Marsall-Petrovsky was published in New York in 1894, and reprinted
      several times. John Okal published Janosik, a Carpathian Saga in 1954.

      Martin Votruba, Slovak Studies Program, University of Pittsburgh

      Note: If anyone can help identify who "Dobry Slovak" may have been,
      let me know, please. M.V.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Taoz@aol.com
      Martin, In your listing of films about Janos^ik I notice you didn t mention one I saw. Probably about 1935 give or take some years, there was a talkie about
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 26, 2005
        Martin,
        In your listing of films about Janos^ik I notice you didn't mention one I
        saw. Probably about 1935 give or take some years, there was a talkie about him
        in Slovak shown in Coaldale, Pa. I don't remember much about it but I do
        remember seeing it. It wasn't shown in the local movie theater but in the
        public high school auditorium and it was a packed house. There were a lot of
        Slovaks who lived in the town in those days.
        Do you know of such a film?
        Paul


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Martin Votruba
        ... Thank you, Paul, for the information, it s very useful to know that it was shown here, not just the one from 1921. Your memory is perfect: it was made in
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 27, 2005
          > you didn't mention one I saw. Probably about 1935 give or
          > take some years, there was a talkie about him in Slovak
          > shown in Coaldale, Pa.

          Thank you, Paul, for the information, it's very useful to know that
          it was shown here, not just the one from 1921. Your memory is
          perfect: it was made in 1935. I would have liked to include it in
          the series, but that Janosik has not been subtitled.

          There's some continuity between all these Janosiks. The lead actor
          (Theodor Pistek) from Janosik 1921 became the "lead villain" in 1935.
          And the new lead actor of 1935 -- Palo (Pavol) Bielik -- became a
          director later, and directed the two-part Janosik of 1963.


          Martin

          votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
        • Joyce & Bill
          Martin, thank you very much for the information. See you at the movies! Joyce
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 27, 2005
            Martin,
            thank you very much for the information. See you at the movies!
            Joyce
            >
            > From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@...>
            > Date: 2005/02/26 Sat PM 04:38:10 GMT
            > To: Slovak World <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
            > Subject: [Slovak-World] Slovak film series in Phg. (April)
            >
            >
            > > Has there been any mention of when the Slovak films will start
            > showing at Pitt?
            >
            > I include the details below, Joyce. If it comes up garbled on your
            > screen, let me know, please, and I'll redo it in ASCII.
            >
            > If anyone wants the flyer in a better, printable form to display
            > somewhere, e-mail me privately, please at: -- votruba "at" pitt "dot"
            > edu -- (not at the 'coverup' address in the header of this post), and
            > I'll send you its edited version as an attachemnt.
            >
            > Martin
            >
            > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
            >
            > x x x
            >
            > UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH
            > SLOVAK STUDIES PROGRAM
            > SLOVAK FILM SERIES 2005
            >
            > This will be a historic occasion, because the silent film Janosik
            > made in 1921 used to be shown with great success in Slovak-American
            > communities, including in Pittsburgh, through the 1950s, but was
            > thought lost afterwards. With this presentation at the University of
            > Pittsburgh, the first Slovak film Janosik is returning to Pittsburgh
            > at a non-profit viewing after it was restored from two incomplete
            > copies. There will be brief introductions and hadnouts.
            >
            > Sunday, April 3, 2 PM, ? Double feature, 1501 Posvar Hall (next to
            > Hillman Library)
            > Janosik (1h 8') ? historic, Slovak-American silent motion picture
            > from 1921
            > The series opens with Slovakia's first feature movie, the silent
            > film Janosik, made in 1921 with Slovak-American capital by Jaroslav
            > Jerry Siakel, who returned from his home in Chicago to his native
            > central Slovakia to shoot the film on location with Slovak actors.
            > Janosik I (1h 20')
            > One of the most popular domestic movies in Slovakia, the film
            > was partly shot on location in the picturesque, craggy valeys around
            > the real Janosik's home village. It opens with young Janosik learning
            > about the overlords' disregard for their subjects, and continues with
            > him joining a band of merry mountain lads in his early adulthood.
            >
            > Sunday, April 10, 2 PM, (no film), 1501 Posvar Hall (next to Hillman
            > Library)
            > The Thomas Kukucka Memorial Lecture
            > David Doellinger: Slovak Pilgrimages in the 1980s: A Challenge to
            > Communist Power
            >
            > Sunday, April 17, 2 PM, 1501 Posvar Hall (next to Hillman Library)
            > Janosik II (1h 30')
            > Janosik I and II are one film in two parts made in 1963 by
            > director Palo Bielik, who himself had starred in the leading role in
            > another, earlier film about Janosik, which is not currently
            > available. Both parts of Janosik I-II were among the biggest domestic
            > blockbusters that the film studios in Bratislava produced.
            >
            > Sunday, April 24, 2 PM, 1501 Posvar Hall (next to Hillman Library)
            > Jurko the Highwayman (1h 17')
            > Jurko is an endearing nickame for boys called Juraj (George).
            > Not a re-telling of the old legend, this film was made by Slovakia's
            > premier cartoonist Viktor Kubal. It received top awards at two
            > international festivals of films for children. It is particularly
            > suitable as an introduction to the Slovak legend for not just adult
            > but also young audiences, because there are no subtitles. The
            > feature-length cartoon is silent with a soundtrack of Slovak music.
            >
            > JURAJ JANOSIK
            >
            > The central figure of the film series is Juraj Janosik, a highwayman
            > from the village of Terchova in north-west Slovakia who was captured
            > and hanged in 1713 at the age of only 25. His execution was quite
            > common for brigand leaders: he was hung by a hook that was threaded
            > through his left side. For about a hundred years after his death, he
            > appeared in folk stories and market songs, which often gave him
            > miraculous powers and credited him with a number of fanciful exploits.
            >
            > But when in the 19th century the Slovak Romantic poets learned from
            > the publication of his trial proceedings in a popular calendar that
            > he was executed although he robbed for barely over a year and did not
            > take anyone's life, they began to see him as a hero of resistance
            > against the injustices of the feudal past.
            >
            > Especially the poem The Death of Janosik (Smrt Janosikova) by Jan
            > Botto published in 1862 became a hallmark of Slovak Romantic
            > literature. Probably every Slovak recognizes its opening verse "A
            > fire burns brightly on the Mountain of Kings..." (Hori, ohnik, hori,
            > na Kralovej holi...) which is taught several times from grade through
            > high school. A passage from the poem says:
            >
            > From the Tatras to the Danube, this whisper you hear:
            > Take your taxes, you lords, but our vengeance is near.
            > Take them, you wolves; you may repay with your lives!
            > When you least expect it, there will flash out twelve knives:
            > "Halt! A thousand thunderbolts!" -- ten of them jump out --
            > "Give God your soul, and us your ducats!" they shout.
            > Sabers above their heads, and pistols in their hands:
            > "Give back, your Lordship, what you stole from Slovak lands!"
            > From the Tatras to the Danube, the orphans sing:
            > Oh, God, give this brigand all the luck you can bring!
            > All the luck, God, that he needs, from morning till night,
            > in the same measure that he sets injustice right.
            > From his hat he pours ducats, enough and to spare,
            > with yards of Red English for the poorest to wear.
            >
            > After that period, Janosik became not just a highwayman of folk
            > stories who took from the rich and gave to the poor, but also an
            > enormously popular hero portrayed by some writers, painters, and
            > sculptors as a noble symbol of people's longing for freedom, and by
            > others as an adventurous, charming friend of those in need.
            >
            > The Slovak Pittsburghers did not remain behind. The novel Janosik,
            > the Young Master of Freedom: A Legend of Times Gone By was published
            > in Slovak in Pittsburgh in 1893 under the pseudonym "Dobry Slovak."
            > Another Slovak-written novel Janosik, the Captain of Mountain Lads:
            > His Tumultuous Life and Horrific Death by Slovak-American Gustav
            > Marsall-Petrovsky was published in New York in 1894, and reprinted
            > several times. John Okal published Janosik, a Carpathian Saga in 1954.
            >
            > Martin Votruba, Slovak Studies Program, University of Pittsburgh
            >
            > Note: If anyone can help identify who "Dobry Slovak" may have been,
            > let me know, please. M.V.
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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