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Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak-American Christmas Memories

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  • Martin Votruba
    ... That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather unlike corn/maze
    Message 1 of 76 , Jan 7, 2005
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      > they should associate it with an apple other than it's a
      > fruit and it's red.

      That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest
      thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather
      unlike corn/maze (once it was cultivated), but when the Anglos began
      to grow it on a large scale in America, they actually made the word
      _corn_ mean "maze." You mostly have to say grains, cereals today to
      make it clear that you don't mean corn/maze.

      The word _mel-_ that gave today's "melon" in English used to describe
      a variety of round fruits including, e.g., oranges, which still shows
      in the word _marmalade_.

      > Now I don't know if the forbidden fruit was an
      > apple or a tomato.

      Ha, ha, RU, it has to be the pomo d'oro down there in El Dorado.


      Martin

      votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
    • Martin Votruba
      ... That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather unlike corn/maze
      Message 76 of 76 , Jan 7, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        > they should associate it with an apple other than it's a
        > fruit and it's red.

        That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest
        thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather
        unlike corn/maze (once it was cultivated), but when the Anglos began
        to grow it on a large scale in America, they actually made the word
        _corn_ mean "maze." You mostly have to say grains, cereals today to
        make it clear that you don't mean corn/maze.

        The word _mel-_ that gave today's "melon" in English used to describe
        a variety of round fruits including, e.g., oranges, which still shows
        in the word _marmalade_.

        > Now I don't know if the forbidden fruit was an
        > apple or a tomato.

        Ha, ha, RU, it has to be the pomo d'oro down there in El Dorado.


        Martin

        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
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