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Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak-American Christmas Memories

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  • Martin Votruba
    ... It s the same as when it was called golden apple, love apple, and many other names. The tomato looked marvelously different from all the fruit on the
    Message 1 of 76 , Jan 5, 2005
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      > it's taken from the German word for tomato, "paradiesapfel"
      > (Paradise apple). The book says that perhaps the tomato was so
      > named by an enthusiastic gardener.

      It's the same as when it was called "golden apple," "love apple," and
      many other names. The tomato looked marvelously different from all
      the fruit on the Europeans' tables -- it was consistently bright,
      almost shining red like nothing else. So when tomatoes were new
      people were coming up with all kinds of fanciful names for them, and
      one eventually became "it." For instance, the German speakers
      sometimes mixed it up with a word that came to mean "an orange" in
      several languages, including Slovak. Another curious German
      invention for the tomato was "wolf's pear."

      Paradajka [paradayka] is actually from the Austrian-German version of
      the word based on "apple of paradise": Paradeiser [paradayzer]. It's
      one of those neat instances when a word gives us "historical
      political geography."

      The question would be: Why do just Slovak, Hungarian,
      Austrian-German, Czech, Croatian, Slovenian and Romanian have this
      word?

      The countries around and elsewhere have other words: German-German
      (Tomate), Polish (pomidor), Bulgarian...

      All of the countries with _parad-_ were in the Habsburg-Austrian
      monarchy when tomatoes spread in Europe. The marvelous, prized
      tomatoes clearly entered the monarchy through the palaces of its
      fashionable capital Vienna.

      The Czech ethnic activists translated the Austrian-German word in the
      19th century, so hey have _rajc~e_ (from _raj_ = "paradise" in many
      Slavic languages, including Slovak).


      Martin

      votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
    • Martin Votruba
      ... That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather unlike corn/maze
      Message 76 of 76 , Jan 7, 2005
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        > they should associate it with an apple other than it's a
        > fruit and it's red.

        That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest
        thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather
        unlike corn/maze (once it was cultivated), but when the Anglos began
        to grow it on a large scale in America, they actually made the word
        _corn_ mean "maze." You mostly have to say grains, cereals today to
        make it clear that you don't mean corn/maze.

        The word _mel-_ that gave today's "melon" in English used to describe
        a variety of round fruits including, e.g., oranges, which still shows
        in the word _marmalade_.

        > Now I don't know if the forbidden fruit was an
        > apple or a tomato.

        Ha, ha, RU, it has to be the pomo d'oro down there in El Dorado.


        Martin

        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
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