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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak-American Christmas Memories

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  • Bruce Bagin
    And our family favorite is Braciolle, the childre now all grown and left order it for e3very birthday and every holiday, although King Crab is a good second
    Message 1 of 76 , Jan 4, 2005
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      And our family favorite is Braciolle, the childre now all grown and left
      order it for e3very birthday and every holiday, although King Crab is a good
      second finisher, but I continue to make the mushroom sauerkraut soup which
      is loved by some and tolerated by others. Part of the wealth of america is
      that we are a nation of immigrants and each has blessed the culture with
      some real fine cooking. Can you imagine if we were sole a nation of
      imigrants from the British Isles? I think that we would be very thin from
      not eating.

      When we were traveling in England, we found that the only restaurants that
      prepared food that tasted good were the French, Portugese, and Chinese
      restaurants. Each effort at a Brtish establishment was a disappointment.
      My wife was drooling over a six inch (high) apple pie and had to have some
      with coffee. She asked, How does one remove all taste from apples?

      The traditions are wonderful and we should enjoy those that are memorable,
      and healthful.





      Bruce Bagin
      312 Boulevard of the Allies,#600
      Pittsburgh, PA 15222-1923
      412-281-1110
      FAX 412-281-8481




      ----Original Message Follows----
      From: Michelle A Mader <Michelle.A.Mader@...>
      Reply-To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak-American Christmas Memories
      Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 09:18:43 -0500



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Martin Votruba
      ... That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather unlike corn/maze
      Message 76 of 76 , Jan 7, 2005
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        > they should associate it with an apple other than it's a
        > fruit and it's red.

        That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest
        thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather
        unlike corn/maze (once it was cultivated), but when the Anglos began
        to grow it on a large scale in America, they actually made the word
        _corn_ mean "maze." You mostly have to say grains, cereals today to
        make it clear that you don't mean corn/maze.

        The word _mel-_ that gave today's "melon" in English used to describe
        a variety of round fruits including, e.g., oranges, which still shows
        in the word _marmalade_.

        > Now I don't know if the forbidden fruit was an
        > apple or a tomato.

        Ha, ha, RU, it has to be the pomo d'oro down there in El Dorado.


        Martin

        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
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