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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak-American Christmas Memories

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  • David
    Caye, Caye, Caye: Shame on you. About 10 years ago, a big campaign went on to rid the world of using the word XMAS for Christmas. Nobody seems to use it
    Message 1 of 76 , Jan 4, 2005
      Caye, Caye, Caye: Shame on you. About 10 years ago, a big campaign went on
      to rid the world of using the word XMAS for Christmas. Nobody seems to use
      it anymore. But low and behold, before my eyes, there was the shortcut word
      for Christmas. Do you want to be responsible for taking Christ our of
      Christmas? Of course, I am just kidding around with you, but we do have to
      spell out the word Christmas. About 40 years ago, when my wife and I had a
      gift and apparel shop, I made a sign for the window. As I walked up the
      sidewalk, I looked at the sign and thought...Man, there is something wrong
      with that sign. Then I realized, I spelled Christmas...Chrismas. It seemed
      nobody else noticed my mistake. I really felt stupid. But that is life.
      Trying to be humble, Dave

      At 06:23 AM 1/4/2005 -0800, you wrote:


      >I wanna come to your house for X-mas [Eve] Dinner,
      >Michelle -- I love all fishes (too bad there are only
      >7 classically) -- and not much can top lasagna.
      >
      >
      >Caye
      >
      >
      >
      >--- Michelle A Mader <Michelle.A.Mader@...>
      >wrote:
      >
      > > Wm. Brna wrote:
      > >
      > > >Whose traditions do we hold? I am Slovak, born of
      > > Slovak parents, my
      > > >wife is Norwegian, born of Norwegian ancestry.
      > >
      > > Amen. My father was Slovak, born of immigrant
      > > Slovak parents. My
      > > mother was Croatian and Italian, again born of
      > > immigrant parents. My
      > > husband is from Germany. To top it off, both of my
      > > parents and all of my
      > > grandparents were dead by the time I turned 16 and
      > > since none of them
      > > had anticipated my parents dying early, they didn't
      > > leave any of the
      > > traditional
      > > recipes.
      > >
      > > Add to that the personal preferences of the people
      > > involved. I grew up having
      > > poppyseed roll an nut roll for breakfast on
      > > Christmas morning. My husband and
      > > children dislike both of them so we've created our
      > > own traditional breakfast.
      > >
      > > I grew up with the 7 kinds of fish Christmas Eve
      > > dinner. My children don't
      > > like
      > > fish.
      > >
      > > A few things developed with time and my children
      > > think of them as traditions
      > > even though they're relatively new even to my
      > > husband and myself. For example,
      > > I wasn't sure for a while if my kids knew that not
      > > everyone has lasagna for
      > > Christmas dinner.
      > >
      > >
      > > Michelle Maco Mader
      > > Cleveland, Ohio USA
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >__________________________________
      >Do you Yahoo!?
      >Dress up your holiday email, Hollywood style. Learn more.
      >http://celebrity.mail.yahoo.com
      >
      >
      >
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Martin Votruba
      ... That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather unlike corn/maze
      Message 76 of 76 , Jan 7, 2005
        > they should associate it with an apple other than it's a
        > fruit and it's red.

        That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest
        thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather
        unlike corn/maze (once it was cultivated), but when the Anglos began
        to grow it on a large scale in America, they actually made the word
        _corn_ mean "maze." You mostly have to say grains, cereals today to
        make it clear that you don't mean corn/maze.

        The word _mel-_ that gave today's "melon" in English used to describe
        a variety of round fruits including, e.g., oranges, which still shows
        in the word _marmalade_.

        > Now I don't know if the forbidden fruit was an
        > apple or a tomato.

        Ha, ha, RU, it has to be the pomo d'oro down there in El Dorado.


        Martin

        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
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