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Re: Slovak-American Christmas Memories

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  • amiak27
    Caye, I don t know the Slovak, but in today s German the question Will you wear a tuxedo is spoken (in German of course) Will you wear a Smoking? And
    Message 1 of 76 , Jan 3, 2005
      Caye,

      I don't know the Slovak, but in today's German the question "Will you
      wear a tuxedo" is spoken (in German of course) "Will you wear a
      Smoking?" And "Smoking" is the German word, not 'Rouchen' as you
      might suspect. In the same sense a German will understand "t-shirt"
      and be totally baffled by the Germanized "t-hemd" So you can
      believe "Smoking" is the entire word, and you don't need to
      append 'jacket' as in "Smoking Jacket". That may very well confuse
      people.

      Ron

      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@y...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I find it pretty funny that there would even be a word
      > for tuxedo in the Slovak language, and it's also
      > interesting that "smoking" would be the substitute --
      > although maybe like 'smoking jacket' or 'ascot tie'
      >
      >
      > Caye
      >
      >
      >
      > --- Helen Fedor <hfed@l...> wrote:
      >
      > > Tuxedo???? "Smoking" is the standard word for
      > > tuxedo. I've checked a
      > > couple of dictionaries and can't find anything else.
      > >
      > > The root of all these words is "mok" (help me here,
      > > Joe and Martin),
      > > which means wet.
      > >
      > > Helen
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > >>> sandman6294@y... 12/31/2004 12:55:19 AM >>>
      > >
      > > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor"
      > > <hfed@l...> wrote:
      > > > "Mac~anka" comes from the Zemplin word "mac~ac",
      > > meaning to dip
      > > > something into liquid, or to moisten it.
      > > >
      > > > Helen
      > >
      > > Thanks Helen. There are a couple of Slovak words
      > > that are close.
      > > Zmac^at' (drench, wet through) and zmoc^it' (to wet,
      > > douse, dip in).
      > > Another definition (probably wrong) that was listed
      > > for zmoc^it' was
      > > tuxedo. I guess if you wear one while "wetting your
      > > whistle" it
      > > might make sense. ;-)
      > >
      > > RU
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
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    • Martin Votruba
      ... That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather unlike corn/maze
      Message 76 of 76 , Jan 7, 2005
        > they should associate it with an apple other than it's a
        > fruit and it's red.

        That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest
        thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather
        unlike corn/maze (once it was cultivated), but when the Anglos began
        to grow it on a large scale in America, they actually made the word
        _corn_ mean "maze." You mostly have to say grains, cereals today to
        make it clear that you don't mean corn/maze.

        The word _mel-_ that gave today's "melon" in English used to describe
        a variety of round fruits including, e.g., oranges, which still shows
        in the word _marmalade_.

        > Now I don't know if the forbidden fruit was an
        > apple or a tomato.

        Ha, ha, RU, it has to be the pomo d'oro down there in El Dorado.


        Martin

        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
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