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Re: [Slovak-World] A smoking gun

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  • Martin Votruba
    ... Clearly, I ve lost track of the thread, Helen. I thought you and RU explained the other words: as you said, the root in them is -mok-/-moc~-, which
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 3, 2005
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      > I was referring to all the earlier words we'd
      > talked about: mac~anka, zmoc~eny, etc.

      Clearly, I've lost track of the thread, Helen. I thought you and RU
      explained the other words: as you said, the root in them is
      -mok-/-moc~-, which relates to "wet." The origin of macanka, as you
      said, is a "dip," a thickish liquid you eat by dipping the bread in,
      "making it wet with the sauce." The contemporary Slovak word for
      sauce, _oma'c~ka_, has the same origin.

      Hrutka/hrudka came from _hruda_, "lump (of earth)."

      Anthropologists say that thickish liquids, from porridge-like to all
      kinds of stews, eaten with baked dough (a wide variety of breads)
      have historically been the most frequently eaten dishes in Europe for
      at least much of the past millennium.

      As Ron said, we sometimes look for traditions, but so much of what we
      think of as ancient is barely a century old. To bring it back to
      Christmas -- gift giving is a very new thing. In some villages in
      Slovakia, people didn't begin to give each other presents until the
      second half of the twentieth century. A lot of what we see as old
      traditions -- from folk costumes and dishes through things like
      Christmas trees and presents -- has trickled down from fanciful
      innovations in noblemen's courts, to towns, to villages.
      "McDonaldization" is nothing new as a trend. People always strove to
      imitate the wealthy and powerful, even without the power of
      advertising.


      Martin

      votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
    • Vlad Nad
      fMartin, I disagree with you also. Since 1906 when my grandparents arrived here, they had the same Christmas eve meal. My mother and father continued it, un
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 3, 2005
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        fMartin,

        I disagree with you also. Since 1906 when my grandparents arrived here, they had the same Christmas eve meal. My mother and father continued it, un changed their entire life, and we, continue it as well, not changed from nearly a century ago. When I visited my relatives in Slovkia a couple of years ago, it was confirmed that this was indeed the family Christmas eve meal and has continued there also all these years. So I ask you, please dont try to Mc Donaldize my family, its roots, and traditions as so many others have. For us, it is important to keep the traditions alive, and we take offense at such a generic term as McDonalds, especially since the McDonalds of today, bears no resemblance to the McDonald brothers who started the fast food idea.

        Vlad

        Martin Votruba <votrubam@...> wrote:
        > I was referring to all the earlier words we'd
        > talked about: mac~anka, zmoc~eny, etc.

        Clearly, I've lost track of the thread, Helen. I thought you and RU
        explained the other words: as you said, the root in them is
        -mok-/-moc~-, which relates to "wet." The origin of macanka, as you
        said, is a "dip," a thickish liquid you eat by dipping the bread in,
        "making it wet with the sauce." The contemporary Slovak word for
        sauce, _oma'c~ka_, has the same origin.

        Hrutka/hrudka came from _hruda_, "lump (of earth)."

        Anthropologists say that thickish liquids, from porridge-like to all
        kinds of stews, eaten with baked dough (a wide variety of breads)
        have historically been the most frequently eaten dishes in Europe for
        at least much of the past millennium.

        As Ron said, we sometimes look for traditions, but so much of what we
        think of as ancient is barely a century old. To bring it back to
        Christmas -- gift giving is a very new thing. In some villages in
        Slovakia, people didn't begin to give each other presents until the
        second half of the twentieth century. A lot of what we see as old
        traditions -- from folk costumes and dishes through things like
        Christmas trees and presents -- has trickled down from fanciful
        innovations in noblemen's courts, to towns, to villages.
        "McDonaldization" is nothing new as a trend. People always strove to
        imitate the wealthy and powerful, even without the power of
        advertising.


        Martin

        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu



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