Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Slovak-American Christmas Memories

Expand Messages
  • amiak27
    Vlad, The traditions have their own values as we do hold them, and they bring joy to us as we continue them. When I say they will change, I look upon cultures
    Message 1 of 76 , Jan 2, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Vlad,

      The traditions have their own values as we do hold them, and they
      bring joy to us as we continue them. When I say they will change, I
      look upon cultures as I do a living human being - you and I are not
      the same people we were at age 5 or at age 21. We have grown and
      changed. The foods we look upon today as traditional have changed,
      as evidenced by use of the tomato and potato in the traditional
      diet. They were not traditional 300 years ago. The folk costumes we
      consider traditional are not the same as they were 400 years ago.
      These to have changed and are continuing to change. Even the
      Christianity practiced by most of us only goes back, in one flavor or
      another, some 1200 years.

      If we held solidly to tradition we would change none of the above
      items, but how far back would we go? As far as written and drawn
      records take us, or perhaps to some legends and folklore, but no
      farther.

      I am not advocating changing traditions, just recognizing that they
      change on their own. I too am sad for my nieces and nephew that they
      have lost some of the family Slovak tradition - but then I do not
      carry on as much tradition as my parents or grandparents. So I
      accept life and tradition as it is, a living changing entity, and one
      that will grow, change and in part die, as do all living things.

      Ron

      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Vlad Nad <vladnadd@y...> wrote:
      > Ron,
      >
      > I disagree, if we dont hold to the Slovak traditions as they
      were when our ancestors came from Slovakia, and change them to meet
      our current times, then what value did they have?
      >
      > Vlad
      >
      > sandman6294 <sandman6294@y...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "amiak27" <rmat@p...> wrote:
      > >
      > > This is a good indication we should not shy away from changing
      > Slovak
      > > traditions to fit times and tastes. 300 years ago everyone knew
      > the
      > > tomato was poisnous, so it likely was not a part of the Slovak
      diet!
      > >
      > > Ron
      >
      > You mean Marko Poloko wasn't Slovak?
      >
      > RU
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      > To visit your group on the web, go to:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
      Service.
      >
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Do you Yahoo!?
      > Yahoo! Mail - Easier than ever with enhanced search. Learn more.
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Martin Votruba
      ... That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather unlike corn/maze
      Message 76 of 76 , Jan 7, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        > they should associate it with an apple other than it's a
        > fruit and it's red.

        That happened a lot that people likened a new thing to the closest
        thing they knew. _Corn_ used to describe grains, which are rather
        unlike corn/maze (once it was cultivated), but when the Anglos began
        to grow it on a large scale in America, they actually made the word
        _corn_ mean "maze." You mostly have to say grains, cereals today to
        make it clear that you don't mean corn/maze.

        The word _mel-_ that gave today's "melon" in English used to describe
        a variety of round fruits including, e.g., oranges, which still shows
        in the word _marmalade_.

        > Now I don't know if the forbidden fruit was an
        > apple or a tomato.

        Ha, ha, RU, it has to be the pomo d'oro down there in El Dorado.


        Martin

        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.