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Re: Poppyseed Paradise

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  • amiak27
    Thnks for the information, Martin. I was hoping to learn a bit from the Slovak side. I know the taste from home, but not the story behind it. The book by
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 12, 2004
      Thnks for the information, Martin. I was hoping to learn a bit from
      the Slovak side. I know the taste from home, but not the story
      behind it. The book by Lang is one fo the early ones I bought,
      figuring that there was so little written about Slovaks that I would
      look at our neighbors as well to see what I could learn. I am happy
      to share this and to see what other stories come out of the thread.

      Ron

      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Martin Votruba <votrubam@y...>
      wrote:
      > > strudel (remember, he speaks Hungarian, German and English,
      > > perhaps not the civilized tongues of Slovak and Polish).
      >
      > The Slovaks also call it _strudel_, or _strudla_. It is seen as
      > originally Austrian.
      >
      > > this pastry and its crescent offspring were
      > > the best in the city of Pozsony, today's Bratislava.
      >
      > The Hungarians/Magyars do, but the Slovaks didn't associate them
      with
      > Bratislava. There was actually a break in the commercial
      production
      > of the tiny nut "crescents"/croissants in Bratislava under
      communism,
      > although they were made in Hungary and called _Pozsonyi kifli_
      > ("Bratislava little croissants"). What was made in Slovakia was
      the
      > regular-sized nut croissant mostly sold in supermarkets rather than
      > in pastry shops. The nut roll (roulade, as he calls it) did not
      use
      > to be served in the pastry stores, either. It was seen as
      something
      > people make at home and don't want to go and east in a cafe. They
      > were for the tortes, gateaus, etc. There was an awareness of a
      line
      > of "home-pastries" mostly not available in stores, and
      > "store-pastries" usually not made at home.
      >
      > It's good to have the Hungarian perspective, Ron. Interesting that
      > he's aware of the bobalky (a Slovak word) and calls them that, too.
      >
      >
      > Martin
      >
      > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
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