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Re: [Slovak-World] Poppyseed Paradise II

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  • Dr. Joe Q
    An interesting observation, however, testing positive for opiates as a result of eating poppy seeds is bordering on an urban legend. It is possible to set off
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 12, 2004
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      An interesting observation, however, testing positive
      for opiates as a result of eating poppy seeds is
      bordering on an urban legend. It is possible to set
      off the screening test after eating poppy seeds, but
      you have to eat more than the fabled one bagel.
      Additionally, the level falls below detectable limits
      with a half a day after eating poppy seeds while the
      use of heroin can be detected up to 7 days after the
      last dose. The detection limit for screening tests
      has been adjusted to eliminate this, also, a test for
      the heroin metabolite, monoacetylmorphine (MAM), is
      now available and routinely performed to rule out the
      "bagel" defense.

      Dr. "Q"

      --- amiak27 <rmat@...> wrote:

      >
      > Hmmm... with today's drug testing, are Slovak
      > athletes forbidden from
      > eating poppyseeed before Christmas?
      >
      > An annual herb originating from southwest Asia,
      > poppy was
      > domesticated in Europe in Neolithic times. It was
      > cultivated by the
      > Greeks and cultivation spread to India and China by
      > the 18th century.
      > The poppy is a herbaceous annual with a tap root and
      > erect stem of
      > 60 - 150 cm in height.
      >
      > Originally opium poppies were grown for the
      > pharmaceutical industry
      > for morphine production. Otherwise morphine free
      > varieties have been
      > developed for baking and confectionery purposes.
      >
      >
      > Poppy seeds contain up to 50% of a high quality oil
      > similar to
      > sunflower oil. Poppy seed oil is a typical
      > semi-drying oil which is
      > used in artists' paints, soaps after dehydrogenation
      > and in
      > oleochemical processing as a source of linoleic acid
      >
      >
      > Seed yields are between 0.2-2 t/ha, and are
      > typically 1.5 t/ha, with
      > similar yields of capsule material. Opium is only
      > formed in warm
      > temperate climates and this is where most of poppy
      > seed oil is
      > produced. Opium does not occur in the seeds but is
      > obtained from
      > unripe capsules after manual scarring. They are
      > grown in the
      > Champagne region of France as a morphine producing
      > crop, also in
      > parts of Eastern Europe, particularly Hungary, where
      > drug production
      > is carefully controlled, also in Tasmania,
      > Australia.



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    • Caye Caswick
      I assume you mean from a urine test or maybe a blood test -- what about if they take a hair sample? Lots of employers are now doing the hair thing, as urine
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 12, 2004
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        I assume you mean from a urine test or maybe a blood
        test -- what about if they take a hair sample?

        Lots of employers are now doing the hair thing, as
        urine can be 'fudged.'

        Caye



        --- "Dr. Joe Q" <doctor_jq@...> wrote:

        > An interesting observation, however, testing
        > positive
        > for opiates as a result of eating poppy seeds is
        > bordering on an urban legend. It is possible to set
        > off the screening test after eating poppy seeds, but
        > you have to eat more than the fabled one bagel.
        > Additionally, the level falls below detectable
        > limits
        > with a half a day after eating poppy seeds while the
        > use of heroin can be detected up to 7 days after the
        > last dose. The detection limit for screening tests
        > has been adjusted to eliminate this, also, a test
        > for
        > the heroin metabolite, monoacetylmorphine (MAM), is
        > now available and routinely performed to rule out
        > the
        > "bagel" defense.
        >
        > Dr. "Q"
        >
        > --- amiak27 <rmat@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > > Hmmm... with today's drug testing, are Slovak
        > > athletes forbidden from
        > > eating poppyseeed before Christmas?
        > >
        > > An annual herb originating from southwest Asia,
        > > poppy was
        > > domesticated in Europe in Neolithic times. It was
        > > cultivated by the
        > > Greeks and cultivation spread to India and China
        > by
        > > the 18th century.
        > > The poppy is a herbaceous annual with a tap root
        > and
        > > erect stem of
        > > 60 - 150 cm in height.
        > >
        > > Originally opium poppies were grown for the
        > > pharmaceutical industry
        > > for morphine production. Otherwise morphine free
        > > varieties have been
        > > developed for baking and confectionery purposes.
        > >
        > >
        > > Poppy seeds contain up to 50% of a high quality
        > oil
        > > similar to
        > > sunflower oil. Poppy seed oil is a typical
        > > semi-drying oil which is
        > > used in artists' paints, soaps after
        > dehydrogenation
        > > and in
        > > oleochemical processing as a source of linoleic
        > acid
        > >
        > >
        > > Seed yields are between 0.2-2 t/ha, and are
        > > typically 1.5 t/ha, with
        > > similar yields of capsule material. Opium is only
        > > formed in warm
        > > temperate climates and this is where most of poppy
        > > seed oil is
        > > produced. Opium does not occur in the seeds but is
        > > obtained from
        > > unripe capsules after manual scarring. They are
        > > grown in the
        > > Champagne region of France as a morphine producing
        > > crop, also in
        > > parts of Eastern Europe, particularly Hungary,
        > where
        > > drug production
        > > is carefully controlled, also in Tasmania,
        > > Australia.
        >
        >
        >
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        > Yahoo! Mail - Helps protect you from nasty viruses.
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        >




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      • Dr. Joe Q
        The most common test is urine, what I stated earlier is correct. A blood test is too fleeting, an individual has to be stoned before a blood test means
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 12, 2004
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          The most common test is urine, what I stated earlier
          is correct. A blood test is too fleeting, an
          individual has to be "stoned" before a blood test
          means anything - - - the drug is cleared from the
          blood too fast.

          Hair sampling is somewhat useful, but does not provide
          a good time line. It also is very unreliable as far
          as indicating that the individual really used the drug
          as apposed to being in the vicinity, e.g., marijuana
          smoke. There is a protocol for preparing the hair but
          it is an art now, eventually it will become a science.

          The drug testing business is just that, a business,
          there is a good amount of science associated with the
          business, but there is also a bit of arm waving.
          There are certain patterns seen in screening for drug
          use that provide data that clearly prove that a
          particular drug was used, then there are circumstances
          in which the findings are questionable because further
          testing was not performed. A good example is the use
          of amphetamine, the "inhalers" used for colds have an
          amphetamine in them (and if you work at it, you can
          achieve a euphoria similar to amphetamine abuse by
          taking large quantities of inhalers) - the common
          inhalers usually have L-amphetamine but many have a
          mixture of D and L, Benzidrine is an example. The
          drug screen looks for the amphetamine group. The
          confirmatory test should make a distinction between D
          (the controlled substance) and L amphetamine. But it
          costs money to perform the test to determine the
          difference between D and L. So many times, the screen
          is confirmed but the difference between the D and L
          component is not made.

          Dr. "Q"

          --- Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...> wrote:

          >
          > I assume you mean from a urine test or maybe a blood
          > test -- what about if they take a hair sample?
          >
          > Lots of employers are now doing the hair thing, as
          > urine can be 'fudged.'
          >
          > Caye
          >
          >
          >
          > --- "Dr. Joe Q" <doctor_jq@...> wrote:
          >
          > > An interesting observation, however, testing
          > > positive
          > > for opiates as a result of eating poppy seeds is
          > > bordering on an urban legend. It is possible to
          > set
          > > off the screening test after eating poppy seeds,
          > but
          > > you have to eat more than the fabled one bagel.
          > > Additionally, the level falls below detectable
          > > limits
          > > with a half a day after eating poppy seeds while
          > the
          > > use of heroin can be detected up to 7 days after
          > the
          > > last dose. The detection limit for screening
          > tests
          > > has been adjusted to eliminate this, also, a test
          > > for
          > > the heroin metabolite, monoacetylmorphine (MAM),
          > is
          > > now available and routinely performed to rule out
          > > the
          > > "bagel" defense.
          > >
          > > Dr. "Q"
          > >
          > > --- amiak27 <rmat@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > >
          > > > Hmmm... with today's drug testing, are Slovak
          > > > athletes forbidden from
          > > > eating poppyseeed before Christmas?
          > > >
          > > > An annual herb originating from southwest Asia,
          > > > poppy was
          > > > domesticated in Europe in Neolithic times. It
          > was
          > > > cultivated by the
          > > > Greeks and cultivation spread to India and China
          > > by
          > > > the 18th century.
          > > > The poppy is a herbaceous annual with a tap root
          > > and
          > > > erect stem of
          > > > 60 - 150 cm in height.
          > > >
          > > > Originally opium poppies were grown for the
          > > > pharmaceutical industry
          > > > for morphine production. Otherwise morphine free
          > > > varieties have been
          > > > developed for baking and confectionery purposes.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Poppy seeds contain up to 50% of a high quality
          > > oil
          > > > similar to
          > > > sunflower oil. Poppy seed oil is a typical
          > > > semi-drying oil which is
          > > > used in artists' paints, soaps after
          > > dehydrogenation
          > > > and in
          > > > oleochemical processing as a source of linoleic
          > > acid
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Seed yields are between 0.2-2 t/ha, and are
          > > > typically 1.5 t/ha, with
          > > > similar yields of capsule material. Opium is
          > only
          > > > formed in warm
          > > > temperate climates and this is where most of
          > poppy
          > > > seed oil is
          > > > produced. Opium does not occur in the seeds but
          > is
          > > > obtained from
          > > > unripe capsules after manual scarring. They are
          > > > grown in the
          > > > Champagne region of France as a morphine
          > producing
          > > > crop, also in
          > > > parts of Eastern Europe, particularly Hungary,
          > > where
          > > > drug production
          > > > is carefully controlled, also in Tasmania,
          > > > Australia.



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        • Caye Caswick
          Quite interesting ... good to know, thanks Doc. Caye ... __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Meet the all-new My Yahoo! - Try it today!
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 13, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Quite interesting ... good to know, thanks Doc.


            Caye



            --- "Dr. Joe Q" <doctor_jq@...> wrote:

            > The most common test is urine, what I stated earlier
            > is correct. A blood test is too fleeting, an
            > individual has to be "stoned" before a blood test
            > means anything - - - the drug is cleared from the
            > blood too fast.
            >
            > Hair sampling is somewhat useful, but does not
            > provide
            > a good time line. It also is very unreliable as far
            > as indicating that the individual really used the
            > drug
            > as apposed to being in the vicinity, e.g., marijuana
            > smoke. There is a protocol for preparing the hair
            > but
            > it is an art now, eventually it will become a
            > science.
            >
            > The drug testing business is just that, a business,
            > there is a good amount of science associated with
            > the
            > business, but there is also a bit of arm waving.
            > There are certain patterns seen in screening for
            > drug
            > use that provide data that clearly prove that a
            > particular drug was used, then there are
            > circumstances
            > in which the findings are questionable because
            > further
            > testing was not performed. A good example is the
            > use
            > of amphetamine, the "inhalers" used for colds have
            > an
            > amphetamine in them (and if you work at it, you can
            > achieve a euphoria similar to amphetamine abuse by
            > taking large quantities of inhalers) - the common
            > inhalers usually have L-amphetamine but many have a
            > mixture of D and L, Benzidrine is an example. The
            > drug screen looks for the amphetamine group. The
            > confirmatory test should make a distinction between
            > D
            > (the controlled substance) and L amphetamine. But it
            > costs money to perform the test to determine the
            > difference between D and L. So many times, the
            > screen
            > is confirmed but the difference between the D and L
            > component is not made.
            >
            > Dr. "Q"
            >
            > --- Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...> wrote:
            >
            > >
            > > I assume you mean from a urine test or maybe a
            > blood
            > > test -- what about if they take a hair sample?
            > >
            > > Lots of employers are now doing the hair thing, as
            > > urine can be 'fudged.'
            > >
            > > Caye
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --- "Dr. Joe Q" <doctor_jq@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > > An interesting observation, however, testing
            > > > positive
            > > > for opiates as a result of eating poppy seeds is
            > > > bordering on an urban legend. It is possible to
            > > set
            > > > off the screening test after eating poppy seeds,
            > > but
            > > > you have to eat more than the fabled one bagel.
            > > > Additionally, the level falls below detectable
            > > > limits
            > > > with a half a day after eating poppy seeds while
            > > the
            > > > use of heroin can be detected up to 7 days after
            > > the
            > > > last dose. The detection limit for screening
            > > tests
            > > > has been adjusted to eliminate this, also, a
            > test
            > > > for
            > > > the heroin metabolite, monoacetylmorphine (MAM),
            > > is
            > > > now available and routinely performed to rule
            > out
            > > > the
            > > > "bagel" defense.
            > > >
            > > > Dr. "Q"
            > > >
            > > > --- amiak27 <rmat@...> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > >
            > > > > Hmmm... with today's drug testing, are Slovak
            > > > > athletes forbidden from
            > > > > eating poppyseeed before Christmas?
            > > > >
            > > > > An annual herb originating from southwest
            > Asia,
            > > > > poppy was
            > > > > domesticated in Europe in Neolithic times. It
            > > was
            > > > > cultivated by the
            > > > > Greeks and cultivation spread to India and
            > China
            > > > by
            > > > > the 18th century.
            > > > > The poppy is a herbaceous annual with a tap
            > root
            > > > and
            > > > > erect stem of
            > > > > 60 - 150 cm in height.
            > > > >
            > > > > Originally opium poppies were grown for the
            > > > > pharmaceutical industry
            > > > > for morphine production. Otherwise morphine
            > free
            > > > > varieties have been
            > > > > developed for baking and confectionery
            > purposes.
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > > Poppy seeds contain up to 50% of a high
            > quality
            > > > oil
            > > > > similar to
            > > > > sunflower oil. Poppy seed oil is a typical
            > > > > semi-drying oil which is
            > > > > used in artists' paints, soaps after
            > > > dehydrogenation
            > > > > and in
            > > > > oleochemical processing as a source of
            > linoleic
            > > > acid
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > > Seed yields are between 0.2-2 t/ha, and are
            > > > > typically 1.5 t/ha, with
            > > > > similar yields of capsule material. Opium is
            > > only
            > > > > formed in warm
            > > > > temperate climates and this is where most of
            > > poppy
            > > > > seed oil is
            > > > > produced. Opium does not occur in the seeds
            > but
            > > is
            > > > > obtained from
            > > > > unripe capsules after manual scarring. They
            > are
            > > > > grown in the
            > > > > Champagne region of France as a morphine
            > > producing
            > > > > crop, also in
            > > > > parts of Eastern Europe, particularly Hungary,
            > > > where
            > > > > drug production
            > > > > is carefully controlled, also in Tasmania,
            > > > > Australia.
            >
            >
            >
            > __________________________________
            > Do you Yahoo!?
            > Send a seasonal email greeting and help others. Do
            > good.
            > http://celebrity.mail.yahoo.com
            >




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