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Piper on the Mountain

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  • krejc@aol.com
    to whoever recommended the book Piper on the Mountain , you gave us a great referral. I borrowed the book on cassette from the library and listened to it
    Message 1 of 15 , Nov 10, 2004
      to whoever recommended the book "Piper on the Mountain", you gave us a great
      referral.
      I borrowed the book on cassette from the library and listened to it going
      back and forth to work each day. It was the story of a murder and the setting
      for the investigation was on the Slovak side of the Tatry Mountains.
      thanks for the suggestion.
      Noreen


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Matchett
      Noreen, that was me. I was surprised that you could find it on cassette. See if you can get The Deliverance of Sister Cecilia by Sister Cecilia as told to
      Message 2 of 15 , Nov 10, 2004
        Noreen, that was me. I was surprised that you could find it on
        cassette. See if you can get "The Deliverance of Sister Cecilia" by
        Sister Cecilia as told to William Brinkley, 1954. I just read it a
        second time. Gives you a look at what the communists did to take away
        religion in Slovakia. Julia Matchett

        > to whoever recommended the book "Piper on the Mountain", you gave us a
        > great
        > referral.
        > I borrowed the book on cassette from the library and listened to it
        > going
        > back and forth to work each day. It was the story of a murder and the
        > setting
        > for the investigation was on the Slovak side of the Tatry Mountains.
        > thanks for the suggestion.
        > Noreen
      • krejc@aol.com
        In a message dated 11/10/04 4:04:49 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... yes, me too. it is hard to find time to read at times, but a cassette is easy to do if you
        Message 3 of 15 , Nov 10, 2004
          In a message dated 11/10/04 4:04:49 PM Eastern Standard Time,
          wmatchett@... writes:

          > I was surprised that you could find it on
          > cassette.

          yes, me too. it is hard to find time to read at times, but a cassette is
          easy to do if you travel many miles each day. Julia, it was a great story.
          thanks.
          as for the Deliverance of Sister Cecilia, it cannot be found in our area. i
          tried when this came up some time back. It is not on Amazon.com either. what
          is the ISBN of this book? sounds interesting.
          "The Brotherhood of Silence"was another good book about the Slovak
          underground.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Matchett
          Noreen, You can find several sources for this book at Bookfinder.com. Julia M.
          Message 4 of 15 , Nov 11, 2004
            Noreen, You can find several sources for this book at Bookfinder.com.
            Julia M.
            >
            >> I was surprised that you could find it on
            >> cassette.
            >
            > yes, me too. it is hard to find time to read at times, but a cassette
            > is
            > easy to do if you travel many miles each day. Julia, it was a great
            > story.
            > thanks.
            > as for the Deliverance of Sister Cecilia, it cannot be found in our
            > area. i
            > tried when this came up some time back. It is not on Amazon.com
            > either. what
            > is the ISBN of this book? sounds interesting.
            > "The Brotherhood of Silence"was another good book about the Slovak
            > underground.
            >
          • Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)
            I just finished Piper on the Mountain , a murder mystery set in the Slovak Tatras. Someone on the list recommended it - thanks, it was a good read! A couple
            Message 5 of 15 , Jan 6, 2005
              I just finished "Piper on the Mountain", a murder mystery set in the
              Slovak Tatras. Someone on the list recommended it - thanks, it was a
              good read!

              A couple of questions:

              Much of the action takes place in a small valley called Zbojska Dolina
              in the Low Tatras close by Liptovky Mikulas. Does anyone know if this
              valley really exists, or is it fictional?

              Is the tourist inn Riavka in that valley also fictional? I thought if
              the valley really exists, the inn might be fictional, as I doubt any
              inn would like to be associated with murder!

              The book was pretty good with its Slovak placenames, only a few
              spelling errors (like Tatranske Lomnica instead of Tatranska Lomnica).
              It even included a few accent marks over vowels, though it wasn't
              consistant and left out some too.

              The local police station in the book is in Liptovsky Pavol. Is there
              really such a place? I thought it might be the fictional equivalent
              of Liptovsky Peter.

              Finally, there are only a few phrases in Slovak in the book, but one
              of them caught my eye. Someone knocks on the police chief's door, and
              he calls out "Pod'te d'alej", and then again in English "Come in". Is
              "pod'te d'alej" really used as we use "come in"? It sounds like it
              ought to mean "go farther, go on, keep going".

              Joe
            • BJLK@aol.com
              In a message dated 1/6/2005 7:42:05 AM Central Standard Time, JArmata@gsphdean.gsph.pitt.edu writes: Finally, there are only a few phrases in Slovak in the
              Message 6 of 15 , Jan 6, 2005
                In a message dated 1/6/2005 7:42:05 AM Central Standard Time,
                JArmata@... writes:

                Finally, there are only a few phrases in Slovak in the book, but one of them
                caught my eye. Someone knocks on the police chief's door, and he calls out
                "Pod'te d'alej", and then again in English "Come in". Is "pod'te d'alej"
                really used as we use "come in"? It sounds like it ought to mean "go farther,
                go on, keep going".



                ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                One of my dictionaries (published by SPN) actually does give "pod'(te)
                d'alej" as a translation for, "Come in!" However, Edith Pargeter (aka Ellis
                Peters) was fluent in Czech, not Slovak, so her descriptions of some social
                interactions in the book may be subtlely influenced by her own social perceptions.

                B. J.



                ____________________________
                B. J. Licko-Keel (BJLK@...)


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jane Policelli
                Hi Joe On google I found the following Cycle routes ... offers some refreshment before the route continues and climbs up to the saddle Zbojska. From here it
                Message 7 of 15 , Jan 6, 2005
                  Hi Joe
                  On google I found the following

                  "Cycle routes
                  ... offers some refreshment before the route continues and climbs up to the
                  saddle Zbojska.
                  From here it runs downhill through the valley Certova dolina /To the ...
                  www.liptovtravel.com/holiday/cyklo.html - 8k - Cached - Similar pages "

                  that might give you some insight to your question about Zbojaska Dolina

                  Also "Pod'te d'alej" is the way my father asked someone in and he claimed
                  that he spoke the proper Slovak since he came from
                  Partizanska Lupca - this was a family think since my mother came from
                  Uzhgorod. Needlesss to say my slovak is mixed between the heavy eastern
                  dialect/proper slovak/hungarian and a little czeh.

                  Hope this helps.

                  Jane

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)
                  [mailto:JArmata@...]
                  Sent: January 6, 2005 8:40 AM
                  To: 'Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com'
                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Piper on the Mountain



                  I just finished "Piper on the Mountain", a murder mystery set in the
                  Slovak Tatras. Someone on the list recommended it - thanks, it was a
                  good read!

                  A couple of questions:

                  Much of the action takes place in a small valley called Zbojska Dolina
                  in the Low Tatras close by Liptovky Mikulas. Does anyone know if this
                  valley really exists, or is it fictional?

                  Is the tourist inn Riavka in that valley also fictional? I thought if
                  the valley really exists, the inn might be fictional, as I doubt any
                  inn would like to be associated with murder!

                  The book was pretty good with its Slovak placenames, only a few
                  spelling errors (like Tatranske Lomnica instead of Tatranska Lomnica).
                  It even included a few accent marks over vowels, though it wasn't
                  consistant and left out some too.

                  The local police station in the book is in Liptovsky Pavol. Is there
                  really such a place? I thought it might be the fictional equivalent
                  of Liptovsky Peter.

                  Finally, there are only a few phrases in Slovak in the book, but one
                  of them caught my eye. Someone knocks on the police chief's door, and
                  he calls out "Pod'te d'alej", and then again in English "Come in". Is
                  "pod'te d'alej" really used as we use "come in"? It sounds like it
                  ought to mean "go farther, go on, keep going".

                  Joe




                  Yahoo! Groups Links
                • Martin Votruba
                  I instantly ordered it on ILL, Joe! ... None of the valleys in Liptov is named after highwaymen. I don t think there s a valley named after highwaymen anywhere
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jan 6, 2005
                    I instantly ordered it on ILL, Joe!

                    > in a small valley called Zbojska Dolina in the
                    > Low Tatras close by Liptovsky Mikulas. Does anyone know
                    > if this valley really exists

                    None of the valleys in Liptov is named after highwaymen.

                    I don't think there's a valley named after highwaymen anywhere in
                    Slovakia. There are a few other natural features, though: crags, a
                    pass, a cavern, at least one stream (but that's after the village
                    Zboj); and a mountain hut in the High Tatras (Zbojnicka chata).

                    I haven't heard of an inn called Riavka in the Liptov part of the
                    Tatras. There certainly isn't an isolated inn in a mountain valley
                    with that name (but I don't know whether a village tavern might be
                    called that).

                    Google lists a private cottage "Riavka" on the other, southern slopes
                    of the Low Tatras, but that's neither Liptov, nor a tavern. _Riavka_
                    is a poetic word for "brook/stream."

                    > Liptovsky Pavol

                    Doesn't exist, but there's Pavlova Ves in Liptov.

                    > "Pod'te d'alej"

                    As B.J. said, it's standard Slovak. The basic phrase actually is
                    just: (Knock-knock) -- "Dalej!"


                    Martin

                    votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                  • Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)
                    Thanks to all for the responses! The times I was in Slovakia, I don t think I ever knocked on a door, so I wasn t familiar with d alej responding to a
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jan 6, 2005
                      Thanks to all for the responses! The times I was in Slovakia, I don't
                      think I ever knocked on a door, so I wasn't familiar with "d'alej"
                      responding to a knock!

                      Joe
                    • helene cincebeaux
                      ... Hi Joe - DID SPOT A RAC~KOVA DOLINA ... HAVE HAD SO MANY SLOVAKS SAY THIS AT THE DOOR - IT S WHAT THEY SAY - MAYBE AS IN COME IN FARTHER. helene
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jan 6, 2005
                        --- "Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)"
                        <JArmata@...> wrote:

                        >
                        > Is the tourist inn Riavka in that valley also
                        > fictional?

                        Hi Joe -
                        DID SPOT A RAC~KOVA DOLINA
                        >
                        > The book was pretty good with its Slovak placenames,
                        > only a few
                        > spelling errors (like Tatranske Lomnica instead of
                        > Tatranska Lomnica).
                        > It even included a few accent marks over vowels,
                        > though it wasn't
                        > consistant and left out some too.
                        >
                        > The local police station in the book is in Liptovsky
                        > Pavol. Is there
                        > really such a place? I thought it might be the
                        > fictional equivalent
                        > of Liptovsky Peter. I AGREE
                        >
                        > Finally, there are only a few phrases in Slovak in
                        > the book, but one
                        > of them caught my eye. Someone knocks on the police
                        > chief's door, and
                        > he calls out "Pod'te d'alej", and then again in
                        > English "Come in". Is
                        > "pod'te d'alej" really used as we use "come in"? It
                        > sounds like it
                        > ought to mean "go farther, go on, keep going".

                        HAVE HAD SO MANY SLOVAKS SAY THIS AT THE DOOR - IT'S
                        WHAT THEY SAY - MAYBE AS IN "COME IN FARTHER."

                        helene




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                      • jmichutka
                        Someone knocks on the police ... Glad you guys mentioned this.....can picture myself knocking a door and hearing pod te d alej! and wondering if I had just
                        Message 11 of 15 , Jan 6, 2005
                          Someone knocks on the police
                          > > chief's door, and
                          > > he calls out "Pod'te d'alej", and then again in
                          > > English "Come in". Is
                          > > "pod'te d'alej" really used as we use "come in"? It
                          > > sounds like it
                          > > ought to mean "go farther, go on, keep going".
                          >
                          > HAVE HAD SO MANY SLOVAKS SAY THIS AT THE DOOR - IT'S
                          > WHAT THEY SAY - MAYBE AS IN "COME IN FARTHER."
                          >

                          Glad you guys mentioned this.....can picture myself knocking a door
                          and hearing "pod'te d'alej!" and wondering if I had just been warned
                          off the property........!

                          BTW, and quite OT: I've been having a terrible time getting email
                          from the various yahoo groups that I'm subscribed to, including Slovak
                          World. Seems like every day or two, Yahoo gets a "hard bounce" from my
                          address and so suspends sending me the groups' emails until I realize
                          I'm not getting emails and check it out and re-activate my account.
                          Does anyone know why this would happen and how I can fix it? It's
                          very frustrating!

                          Julie Michutka
                          jmm@...
                        • Matchett
                          Joe, I was the one who recommended Piper on the Mountain. I feel like the invisible woman. People get me confused with Julie Michutka. Recently I re-read
                          Message 12 of 15 , Jan 6, 2005
                            Joe, I was the one who recommended "Piper on the Mountain." I feel
                            like the invisible woman. People get me confused with Julie Michutka.

                            Recently I re-read "the Deliverance of Sister Cecilia" which takes
                            place in western Slovakia. I think of the people who escaped
                            persecution in Slovakia when I see the Morava River.

                            Am just finishing "Good Soldier Wolf" another interesting book. Julia
                            Matchett
                          • Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)
                            Be invisible no more! Thanks for recommending it, it brought back some nice memories from the Liptov and Tatra area! And they even managed to spell Strbske
                            Message 13 of 15 , Jan 6, 2005
                              Be invisible no more! Thanks for recommending it, it brought back
                              some nice memories from the Liptov and Tatra area! And they even
                              managed to spell Strbske Pleso right, which has to be a heroic effort!

                              Joe


                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: Matchett [mailto:wmatchett@...]
                              Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2005 4:52 PM
                              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Piper on the Mountain



                              Joe, I was the one who recommended "Piper on the Mountain." I feel
                              like the invisible woman. People get me confused with Julie Michutka.

                              Recently I re-read "the Deliverance of Sister Cecilia" which takes
                              place in western Slovakia. I think of the people who escaped
                              persecution in Slovakia when I see the Morava River.

                              Am just finishing "Good Soldier Wolf" another interesting book. Julia

                              Matchett
                            • Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)
                              Thanks Jane for the link, but that Zbojska saddle is too far south for the valley described in the book. I guess the valley is fictional, probably a good idea
                              Message 14 of 15 , Jan 7, 2005
                                Thanks Jane for the link, but that Zbojska saddle is too far south for
                                the valley described in the book. I guess the valley is fictional,
                                probably a good idea given that it's the setting for a murder.

                                Any fujara fans might want to read the book too, as the fujara is the
                                pipe referred to in the title, and it does play a role in the story.
                                After all, how many murder mysteries are there out there that feature
                                a fujara!

                                Joe



                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: Jane Policelli [mailto:jane.policelli@...]
                                Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2005 12:26 PM
                                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Piper on the Mountain



                                Hi Joe
                                On google I found the following

                                "Cycle routes
                                ... offers some refreshment before the route continues and climbs up
                                to the
                                saddle Zbojska.
                                From here it runs downhill through the valley Certova dolina /To the
                                ...
                                www.liptovtravel.com/holiday/cyklo.html - 8k - Cached - Similar pages
                                "

                                that might give you some insight to your question about Zbojaska
                                Dolina
                              • krejc@aol.com
                                In a message dated 1/7/05 12:00:29 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... the fujara and the fujara player were quite an interesting part of the story. [Non-text
                                Message 15 of 15 , Jan 7, 2005
                                  In a message dated 1/7/05 12:00:29 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                                  JArmata@... writes:

                                  > After all, how many murder mysteries are there out there that feature
                                  > a fujara!
                                  >

                                  the fujara and the fujara player were quite an interesting part of the story.


                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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