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34204Re: Re em...imm discussion

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  • CurtB
    Nov 23, 2012
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      Susan,
      I think Martin got it about right. If you think you have a preposition rule about immigrant or emigrant it's up to you to cite a reputable or standard source.

      The standard ones do not have a preposition rule. See Fowler's English usage, Chicago manual of Style, New York Times style manual. Unfortunately they are not online. They all just say perspective as does wikipedia:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emigration

      Curt B.
      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, S <durisek@...> wrote:
      >
      > I was only writing about immigrate and emigrate, and still think what I wrote is correct. I do think it an interesting discussion, for what it reveals about our understanding about language. i also agree that just because I have never heard your way of thinking about this before, and mine has been successfully used all my life, that mine is not necessarily the best. I like hearing your ideas....but remain unconvinced. Broadening to other Latin based examples is not logical, because they are not held to the same narrow restriction as immigrate and emigrate. Sure, one can say beef, or even a human commodity like slaves, is/are imported from Brazil or exported from Brazil, as well as exported to Brazil imported to Brazil. But a person initiating a homeland change emigrates from old place and immigrates to new place on my editing pad. How do we determine if something that works for us and others by consensus over 50 years is indeed true or false? What/who is your authoritative reference or source for this idea?
      > Hmmmm....
      >
      >
      >
      > Susan
      >
      > On Nov 23, 2012, at 1:48 PM, "votrubam" <votrubam@...> wrote:
      >
      > > > The way I learned it
      > > Things are said that ain't so, and some repeat them without considering whether they're true. By the same "logic," it would also be incorrect to say:
      > >
      > > imported from Brazil
      > > invaded from the west
      > > imposed from overseas
      > > inserted from below
      > >
      > > ... "because the Latin prefixes mean 'into,' so you cannot say 'from where' with them."
      > >
      > > That is certainly not the case. The thing with emigrate/immigrate and the English prepositions from and in is one of a number of inventions some repeat about how language works. The fact that something is repeated does not make it true.
      > >
      > > Should Latin be an argument (it ain't), then the authors who wrote what's below would not have known their Latin:
      > >
      > > ... trans mare mediterraneum emigrarit in regiones Europaeas vel Africanas.
      > >
      > > ... emigravit in coelestem patriam.
      > >
      > > ... emigrarent in exteram regionem.
      > >
      > > Joannes Morus ... satis in terra jam se moratum ratus, lubens emigravit in coelum.
      > >
      > > Variae Saxonum Coloniae emigrarint in Marchiam subactam.
      > >
      > > Martin
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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