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34083Re: Study in Slovakia

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  • genmom4
    Oct 10, 2012
      I cannot thank you enough, Martin, for your enlightening comments.
      As I had mentioned, this language course taught far more than just an introduction to learning how to read and write Slovak.

      I find your comments fascinating. I chuckled at the description of the Slovaks that you reference.

      And I appreciate your verification regarding the Slovak history being censored.
      Do you know how the Slovak government handled the rewriting of Slovak history after the fall of communism? I'm curious as to how the material in print today was chosen. Who chose it, and how long did it take to get into print?

      Finally, I have to admit that I'm glad that I didn't know that the sparrows never left the nest. My daughter and I would come back to the room each day hoping that they had flown on their merry way, just because of the sheer numbers of them and the inevitable accumulation of bird feathers coming through the windows. Plus, I can tell you for fact, that those little birdies only sleep about 3 hours at night.

      Now I'm curious about these birds......we watched the mothers constantly flying back and forth, feeding the baby birds. Do the little ones grow to full size over the summer and eventually go out and get their own food over time?

      Barbara



      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "votrubam" <votrubam@...> wrote:
      >
      > > (including the nesting habits of swallows who obviously
      > > take longer than 3 weeks to leave the nest after hatching).
      >
      > Actually, they never leave the nest they were born in until they migrate south in the fall.
      >
      >
      > > I met a teacher from Romania, in her early 20's, who was
      > > there because she lived in a community where everyone
      > > spoke Slovak. She told me that the community had been there
      > > for 5 generations.
      >
      > Some much longer, since the late 1700s. Bram Stoker had a rather unflattering paragraph about the Slovaks of Romania (Transylvania) in _Dracula_ in 1897:
      >
      > "The strangest figures we saw were the Slovaks, who were more barbarian than the rest, with their big cow-boy hats, great baggy dirty-white trousers, white linen shirts, and enormous heavy leather belts, nearly a foot wide, all studded over with brass nails. They wore high boots, with their trousers tucked into them, and had long black hair and heavy black mustaches. They are very picturesque, but do not look prepossessing. On the stage they would be set down at once as some old Oriental band of brigands. They are, however, I am told, very harmless and rather wanting in natural self-assertion."
      >
      > Some of them (only some) actually moved there from what's Hungary today, where their ancestors had resettled earlier, not directly from Slovakia.
      >
      > > So, the families continue to speak Slovak even though
      > > they live in Romania.
      >
      > That has been quite common in farming areas of Central Europe, because the migrants created their own majority language areas where they settled. The cultures of farming communities have a lot of inertia by comparison to urban areas (not to mention hunters and gatherers). For instance, some people still speak Croatian in south-western Slovakia although their ancestors arrived 400+ years ago.
      >
      >
      > > a voucher placed inside to be used at a special store
      > > run by the government
      >
      > Here's an old thread about the Tuzex stores:
      >
      > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/message/22809>
      >
      >
      > > Stefanik's death. My cousin had told me this in the past,
      > > but I just thought that it was her opinion.
      >
      > Few Slovak historians give it any credence.
      >
      > > that Stefanik's name had been removed from all history books
      >
      > Not just his. The Communists, on the whole, taught close to nothing about Czecho-Slovakia's democratic period between the wars. President Masaryk, others, were hardly mentioned at all, except in about one sentence in all of history -- as horrible people who made the new, post-WW I, country capitalist. All that happened during that period was ruthless exploitation and the Communists' heroic fight for, well, communism. And literature was written during that period (but no religious poems).
      >
      >
      > Martin
      >
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