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34031Re: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom

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  • Marianne Herrmann
    Sep 24, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Love, love, love the link and how they spotlight those wonderful children!

      -----Original Message-----
      From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>
      To: Slovak-World <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Mon, Sep 24, 2012 7:12 pm
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom

      Enjoy the display of a really happy group, just across The Slovak Border in Moravia


      From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>
      To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 4:42 PM
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom


      Slovak-World is a site for learning about our heritage and with You, Ben and Joe we all do learn.

      The humor we inject is also part of our heritage. So my thanks to all participants.

      S Panem Bohom.

      From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 2:22 PM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom

      > In Slovakia, was the cymbalom earlier a Gypsy/urban
      > instrument, which later spread to Slovak musicians?

      It seem certain that it started spreading and spread through Gypsy bands, but quite a while back. Some early records are from the late 1600s and early 1700s.

      "Urban" (in a sense) played a role, too, as you assume, Joe -- it became quite fashionable with the nobility and the "suave classes" (pa'ni) early on (the 1700s at the latest), who hired Gypsy as well as non-Gypsy musicians, the noblemen's and panske parties were among the places where bands from the farming villages would often pick it up.

      So, by the 1800s, it was not unusual to find Slovak village bands with a cymbalom, although it remained quite uncommon along the Galician border, which may tie in with what you said about its occurrence and presence in Poland. Still, the cymbalom probably remained substantially more common in Gypsy bands.


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