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33682Re: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen/Vilo

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  • William C. Wormuth
    Aug 6, 2012
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      Joanne,

      Another note: When people were "laid out", in their homes, a basket filled with flowers was hung on the wall next to the door.  I think  that when I see flower displays on the porches.

      My Grandfather told me that he went to view the body and pray for his Irish friend.  When he entered the room, there was a round table at which were seated the mans close friend playing cards.When he approached the casket he saw that the body was not there.  He looked at the rather drunk card players and was aghast at what he saw.  They has removed their friend from his casket and place him at the table and put a beer bottle in his right hand.  Gramp was mad at them and asked how they could do such a disrespectful thing.  the answer came from o nmne of them, in a strong Irish accent "Dohncha knh ttssisah  wake ahn we-er try'an ta wake 'em oop".

      Another was when a good friend died, Gramp when to the funeral.  The next day he met the departed' best friend, an Austrtian immigrant.  "John how come you weren't at your best friend's funeral.  "Maht tah hell fohrr, he ani't kamehn tah maheen".


      In Burda's funeral home, there was a small kitchen leading into the viewing room.  There were always 5 or 6 men sitting there drinking whiskey.  after the burial, people went to visit the homes, bearing foods.

      Which Ralbovky are you?  I would be glad to help with your genealogy,
      should you start.  Ralbovsky is a name from Kúty, Slovakia and I help
      many with research.  I have visited there 28 times since 1971 and know
      many people there. you


      S Panem Bohem,

      Vilo


      ________________________________
      From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, August 6, 2012 8:45 AM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen/Vilo


       
      Vilo, my father was Slovak and mother Polish. Lasak Funeral Home did bury our family when it was located on Congress Street, across from St. Cyril Church and then moved to its Chrysler Street location. I was still young back then, but remember people bringing Mass Cards and food. My Polish aunt told me of how they waked family members at home prior to funeral homes years ago. Yearly my family would go up to Auriesville and have masses said for the deceased of the family.

      I live in the village of Waterford and know of a local funeral home there that prepares a home-cooked meal for a family during a wake which I think is very nice. I never heard of a funeral home doing that other than maybe years ago at Parker Brothers Funeral Home in Watervliet which my mother's side of the family used.

      I did come across a small white wicker basket years ago that someone told me was hung on doors at homes where young children were being waked. A custom for mourners was to put a light-colored flower into the basket when they entered a home waking a child.
      Jo Ann Ralbovsky

      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...> wrote:
      >
      > Joanne Ralbovsky/Cuca and Judy Wormuth were close friends.
      >
      > And am I from Johnstown, Novy Yorku.  Before funeral homes opened, we brought Foods to the homes.  Later, the only gifts were mass Cards and flowers.  tell me, what were the gifts????    Slovaks used Lasak, (Schenectady), until Frank Burda began to direct funerals.
      >
      > When people began using funeral homes, we had three ethnic funeral homes: Maggie Dunn, (Irish), Donnan, (Italian) and Burda, (Slovak).
      >
      > Vilo
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@...>
      > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2012 3:07 PM
      > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen
      >
      >
      >  
      > Karen, I am Slovak and live in upstate, New York, near Albany, and I have heard of the practice of funeral gifts. I grew up knowing about it and seeing it at funerals in my own family. Jo Ann Ralbovsky
      >
      > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > I wouldn't profess to know what goes on in every corner of this vast country. All I can say is this practice of funeral gifts is completely unheard of in NY amongst the numerous faiths that I attend services for.
      > >
      > > On another subject, I am curious of something. I have a photo from my grandmother's brother's funeral procession in Slovakia in the 40s. There is a girl wearing a wedding dress. When I questioned my mother, she quite nonchalantly said that was the girl he was going to marry. I couldn't quite decide if that was sweet or disturbing. I'm curious if this sort of display still goes on.
      > >
      > > Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
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      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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