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33413Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Old Buildings in Slovakia

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  • LongJohn Wayne
    May 9, 2012
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      Ron:

      I knew a man in South Florida who was the equal of any European plasterer.  He was definitely old school.  John Sutton.  He once fashioned the doorway, not the door, mind you, which was imported from Spain or Italy (from an old estate) with rolled archways & in his time & materials estimated the cost at about $250,000.00.  This was over 20 years ago.  It would have to be over a million now.

      We are staying far off topic, but thought you might like to know.

      On my first trip to Parchovany, SK, I was fascinated by the way the rain gutters appeared to be works of art the way they were ornamented or perforated at the tops w/ crosses, crests, or coats of arms, and the way the downspouts would have junctions to deviate away from the structural accents on the buildings.  And this was just in a simple peasant village.

      Chuck
      [Recovering from jetlag, albeit slowly]


      If you haven't already left.



      ________________________________
      From: Ron <amiak27@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, May 7, 2012 7:35 PM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Old Buildings in Slovakia


       
      The Germans were good at a lot of things and weaker in othres, as you might find in different parts of the USA. Central and southern Germans would hire north Germans to do finish brickwork.

      For the really fine custom decorations in plasterwork, the medallions and shields you see on walls and ceilings of palaces, they would import Polish workers who had the skills required. I know the topic intimately, I was engaged to a woman who took over the family specialty business, and once her dad retired even the superbly skilled workers she had could not do that work. It is sad the Poles had so much destruction in their lands that they had to keep those highly skilled tradesmen busy so long!

      Ahhh .. the materials and methods used... another difference in culture. Don't try to find an American who can plaster a wall or a German who can do a decent job on sheet rock! But we should enjoy the differences, as I told a young engineer who returned from Iraq and criticized their materials and methods, with no appreciation for the materials they have, their traditions, and the occasional inappropriateness of our methods and materials.
      You have been to Berlin, so Teufelsberg has meaning for you. I have some good stories of that and Lithuania someday.

      Ron
      PS. I know Pawian from another Polish forum, a very interesting fellow.

      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...> wrote:
      >
      > Ron:
      >  
      > Germans are fond of [re-]using the braces & supports of the Bavarian style buildings, but filling in the brick/stucco/straw portions of the outside walls w/ more modern insulated components.
      >  
      > Warsaw was rebuilt after what the Germans did to it after 'The Rising' & the approach of the Communists as they retreated.  The Russians 'killed two birds w/ one stone by allowing the Poles to slaughter themselves by attacking the Germans.  In so doing they made sure that the patriots & heroes who would oppose the Communist yolk of oppression which would soon replace the Fascist yolk.  But in Warsaw, the reconstruction was made possible by the virtual destruction of other Polish towns for the bricks to rebuild Warsaw.
      >  
      > http://www.warsawuprising.com/
      > http://www.polishforums.com/history-poland-34/restoration-polish-cities-ww-destruction-32836/
      >  
      > I actually forget which town(s) was destroyed to recreate Warsaw.  I was only there a few hours & took in what I could.
      >  
      > Chuck
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Ron <amiak27@...>
      > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 12:05 PM
      > Subject: [Slovak-World] Old Buildings in Slovakia
      >
      >
      >  
      > There is the age of the buildings, Vilo, and and also the methods of construction that are strange to Americans, and thus make it hard to tell if a building is old or simply built in a traditional way. Simply the use of stucco over brick and heavy timbers for roof framing make it difficult to judge. On the US embassy in Vilnius, one of the American workers was astounded to work on renovating a 16th century building - and was shocked when he was told it was built in 1936.
      >
      > Much of what passes for old buildings in Germany are new buildings build more-or-less after the old styles in the reconstruction following WW II. The Frankfurt Romer Platz (loosely town square) is one specific example.
      >
      > I have seen claims of log buildings dating from the 1200's existing in both the Carpathians and in Scandinavia. In the former, the one fellow used phrases "tradition has it" and "reputed to be", whereas some dendrochronological (tree ring) dating would seem to settle most questions about age. The problem to overcome with that exact science is what percentage of the building would count as the age? A log from 1250, or a renovation log from 1764?
      >
      > Periodic fires and natural rotting of wood over centuries have eliminated most of the ancient wooden buildings, and the better protected and often restored brick and plaster buildings are what we see today. They are still quite old by our standards.
      > Ron
      >
      > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Martin,
      > >
      > >
      > > Americans who have never traveled to Europe  Slovakia, can hardly believe the age of some of the buildings in the cities and towns.
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >




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