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26685Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak Immigrant Communities

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  • LongJohn Wayne
    Jul 31, 2009
      This interactive map may be of help.

      http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2009/03/10/us/20090310-immigration-explorer.html

      I learned about it here, S-W some time ago.  Passing it on to the 'newbies.'

      --- On Fri, 7/31/09, Ginger <sportster_76_1999@...> wrote:

      From: Ginger <sportster_76_1999@...>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak Immigrant Communities
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, July 31, 2009, 11:13 PM






       





      What about Duquesne, PA?  Was that at one time a popular destination for Slovaks coming to America?  I believe my great grandparents  came from Czechoslovakia & ended up in Duquesne. 

       

      Ginger



      ____________ _________ _________ __

      From: "BJLK@..." <BJLK@...>

      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com

      Sent: Friday, July 31, 2009 8:04:58 PM

      Subject: [Slovak-World] Slovak Immigrant Communities



       

      At one time (probably about 80 or some years ago, starting around the

      early 20s of the previous century), Shamrock, Texas, was a destination for

      Slovak immigrants who were part of a homesteading community led by a Lutheran

      pastor (whose name I don't know). My best friend's mother, uncle, and her

      cousin's mother arrived via this route. There are probably no remnants

      left of this early history, but it might be interesting to check out.



      Whiting, Indiana, was indeed a thriving Slovak community around the same

      time. My mother arrived there as a young Slovak teenager to join her father

      who preceded her, along with one of his brothers. St. Paul Slovak

      Lutheran Church continues to exist, and this past weekend the community celebrated

      its annual Pierogy Fest which continues to honor both its Slovak and

      Polish roots (even though they are probably now in the minority).



      I suspect that there might be even more forgotten Slovak enclaves scattered

      across the midwest. The Czech communities in Nebraska and Iowa were also

      the home of many Slovaks (like my father's cousins from the Quad Cities

      area) who, because they were in the minority, were not differentiated from

      their close ethnic relatives.



      This is an interesting subject, and I hope there may be other bits of

      information lingering in the memories of the remaining "first-generation kids"

      like me.



      ____________ _________ ____

      B. J. Licko-Keel (BJLK@...)



      In a message dated 7/31/2009 9:06:22 A.M. Central Daylight Time,

      trflynn@jtan. com writes:



      I think there are some settlements of Slovaks in Nebraska and Indiana, but

      I've not heard of any in Texas.



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