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Re: [SkyWires] Re: SWR & the Loop Skywire

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  • Chris Wilson
    ... 25/06/2012 00:38 I am a race car engineer, and I can say for sure that if the silicone sealant you used smelled of vinegar (acetic acid) it s terrible
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 24, 2012
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      >
      > Problem Solved!

      > Once the weather cleared & I had the time, I dropped the wire and
      > checked every foot. Then I disassembled the feed point.

      > BINGO!

      > One connection was corroded completely through! Looked fine coved
      > in the sealant, but somehow our tropical climate got to it despite
      > my efforts. Guess I'll have to set up semi-annual inspections!

      > Once repaired and hauled into position it ran like a top.

      > Thanks, guys!

      >


      25/06/2012 00:38

      I am a race car engineer, and I can say for sure that if the silicone
      sealant you used smelled of vinegar (acetic acid) it's terrible stuff
      around electronics. the acetic acid starts a corrosion process off
      like crazy from the moment it's applied. In automotive usage it has
      another further nasty side effect, and used in quantity it can "kill"
      O2 sensors. If you use a silicone type sealant be SURE it is suitable
      for use on bare electronic connections. VERY generally speaking if it
      does NOT smell of vinegar you are in with a chance. if it DOES smell
      of vinegar.... well you know what can happen perhaps? Good luck 2E0ILY
      England.

      --
      Best Regards,
      Chris Wilson.
    • siegfried jackstien
      Go in a pet shop and ask for aquarium sealant That is neutral (does not smell like vinegar) Dg9bfc Sigi Ps if you have a ladderline fed loop you can easy
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 25, 2012
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        Go in a "pet shop" and ask for aquarium sealant

        That is neutral (does not smell like vinegar)

        Dg9bfc

        Sigi

        Ps if you have a ladderline fed loop you can easy check weekly if everything
        is ok with an ohm-metre (dvm)


        > -----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
        > Von: SkyWires@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SkyWires@yahoogroups.com] Im Auftrag
        > von Chris Wilson
        > Gesendet: Sonntag, 24. Juni 2012 23:42
        > An: Mark
        > Betreff: Re: [SkyWires] Re: SWR & the Loop Skywire
        >
        >
        >
        > >
        > > Problem Solved!
        >
        > > Once the weather cleared & I had the time, I dropped the wire and
        > > checked every foot. Then I disassembled the feed point.
        >
        > > BINGO!
        >
        > > One connection was corroded completely through! Looked fine coved
        > > in the sealant, but somehow our tropical climate got to it despite
        > > my efforts. Guess I'll have to set up semi-annual inspections!
        >
        > > Once repaired and hauled into position it ran like a top.
        >
        > > Thanks, guys!
        >
        > >
        >
        >
        > 25/06/2012 00:38
        >
        > I am a race car engineer, and I can say for sure that if the silicone
        > sealant you used smelled of vinegar (acetic acid) it's terrible stuff
        > around electronics. the acetic acid starts a corrosion process off
        > like crazy from the moment it's applied. In automotive usage it has
        > another further nasty side effect, and used in quantity it can "kill"
        > O2 sensors. If you use a silicone type sealant be SURE it is suitable
        > for use on bare electronic connections. VERY generally speaking if it
        > does NOT smell of vinegar you are in with a chance. if it DOES smell
        > of vinegar.... well you know what can happen perhaps? Good luck 2E0ILY
        > England.
        >
        > --
        > Best Regards,
        > Chris Wilson.
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • eudamac3
        Silicone sealants don t belong around technology. For sealing outdoor connections, find some self-vulcanizing tape. This is offered in Big Box Home supply
        Message 3 of 15 , Jul 9, 2012
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          Silicone sealants don't belong around technology.

          For sealing outdoor connections, find some self-vulcanizing tape. This is offered in Big Box Home supply stores as "rubber splicing tape". Typically UL listed for 600 volts outdoors and underground.

          There's no adhesive to this tape. You stretch it out to about double its relaxed length, then wrap over and over. The stuff sticks to itself, and after a few days of hot/cold, it "melts" into itself, forming an amorphous, and VERY well sealed rubber mass. It is under a lot of tension, even once "set", so you want to protect it with ordinary vinyl electrical tape.

          To remove it, unwrap the vinyl electrical tape, then make just one knife cut on the rubber, and it snaps off, because it's still under tension.

          Friend of mine on the Georgia coast says his connections, 15 years later, looked like new when he exposed them.

          FM

          --- In SkyWires@yahoogroups.com, "siegfried jackstien" <siegfried.jackstien@...> wrote:
          >
          > Go in a "pet shop" and ask for aquarium sealant
          >
          > That is neutral (does not smell like vinegar)
          >
          > Dg9bfc
          >
          > Sigi
          >
          > Ps if you have a ladderline fed loop you can easy check weekly if everything
          > is ok with an ohm-metre (dvm)
          >
          >
          > > -----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
          > > Von: SkyWires@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SkyWires@yahoogroups.com] Im Auftrag
          > > von Chris Wilson
          > > Gesendet: Sonntag, 24. Juni 2012 23:42
          > > An: Mark
          > > Betreff: Re: [SkyWires] Re: SWR & the Loop Skywire
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > >
          > > > Problem Solved!
          > >
          > > > Once the weather cleared & I had the time, I dropped the wire and
          > > > checked every foot. Then I disassembled the feed point.
          > >
          > > > BINGO!
          > >
          > > > One connection was corroded completely through! Looked fine coved
          > > > in the sealant, but somehow our tropical climate got to it despite
          > > > my efforts. Guess I'll have to set up semi-annual inspections!
          > >
          > > > Once repaired and hauled into position it ran like a top.
          > >
          > > > Thanks, guys!
          > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > > 25/06/2012 00:38
          > >
          > > I am a race car engineer, and I can say for sure that if the silicone
          > > sealant you used smelled of vinegar (acetic acid) it's terrible stuff
          > > around electronics. the acetic acid starts a corrosion process off
          > > like crazy from the moment it's applied. In automotive usage it has
          > > another further nasty side effect, and used in quantity it can "kill"
          > > O2 sensors. If you use a silicone type sealant be SURE it is suitable
          > > for use on bare electronic connections. VERY generally speaking if it
          > > does NOT smell of vinegar you are in with a chance. if it DOES smell
          > > of vinegar.... well you know what can happen perhaps? Good luck 2E0ILY
          > > England.
          > >
          > > --
          > > Best Regards,
          > > Chris Wilson.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • Michael Weinstock
          Hi All, The self vulcanizing tape is by far preferable to silicone sealants. That said, if you have to use silicone, the ones to go for are marketed as
          Message 4 of 15 , Jul 10, 2012
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            Hi All,

             

            The self vulcanizing tape is by far preferable to silicone sealants.

             

            That said, if you have to use silicone, the ones to go for are marketed as “neutral cure” sealants and to not have the vinegar smell as they cure.

             

            73

             

            Michael

            VK3EMJ

             

             

            From: SkyWires@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SkyWires@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of eudamac3
            Sent: Tuesday, 10 July 2012 11:56 AM
            To: SkyWires@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [SkyWires] Re: SWR & the Loop Skywire

             

             

            Silicone sealants don't belong around technology.

            For sealing outdoor connections, find some self-vulcanizing tape. This is offered in Big Box Home supply stores as "rubber splicing tape". Typically UL listed for 600 volts outdoors and underground.

            There's no adhesive to this tape. You stretch it out to about double its relaxed length, then wrap over and over. The stuff sticks to itself, and after a few days of hot/cold, it "melts" into itself, forming an amorphous, and VERY well sealed rubber mass. It is under a lot of tension, even once "set", so you want to protect it with ordinary vinyl electrical tape.

            To remove it, unwrap the vinyl electrical tape, then make just one knife cut on the rubber, and it snaps off, because it's still under tension.

            Friend of mine on the Georgia coast says his connections, 15 years later, looked like new when he exposed them.

            FM

            --- In SkyWires@yahoogroups.com, "siegfried jackstien" <siegfried.jackstien@...> wrote:
            >
            > Go in a "pet shop" and ask for aquarium sealant
            >
            > That is neutral (does not smell like vinegar)
            >
            > Dg9bfc
            >
            > Sigi
            >
            > Ps if you have a ladderline fed loop you can easy check weekly if everything
            > is ok with an ohm-metre (dvm)
            >
            >
            > > -----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
            > > Von: SkyWires@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SkyWires@yahoogroups.com] Im Auftrag
            > > von Chris Wilson
            > > Gesendet: Sonntag, 24. Juni 2012 23:42
            > > An: Mark
            > > Betreff: Re: [SkyWires] Re: SWR & the Loop Skywire
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > >
            > > > Problem Solved!
            > >
            > > > Once the weather cleared & I had the time, I dropped the wire and
            > > > checked every foot. Then I disassembled the feed point.
            > >
            > > > BINGO!
            > >
            > > > One connection was corroded completely through! Looked fine coved
            > > > in the sealant, but somehow our tropical climate got to it despite
            > > > my efforts. Guess I'll have to set up semi-annual inspections!
            > >
            > > > Once repaired and hauled into position it ran like a top.
            > >
            > > > Thanks, guys!
            > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > > 25/06/2012 00:38
            > >
            > > I am a race car engineer, and I can say for sure that if the silicone
            > > sealant you used smelled of vinegar (acetic acid) it's terrible stuff
            > > around electronics. the acetic acid starts a corrosion process off
            > > like crazy from the moment it's applied. In automotive usage it has
            > > another further nasty side effect, and used in quantity it can "kill"
            > > O2 sensors. If you use a silicone type sealant be SURE it is suitable
            > > for use on bare electronic connections. VERY generally speaking if it
            > > does NOT smell of vinegar you are in with a chance. if it DOES smell
            > > of vinegar.... well you know what can happen perhaps? Good luck 2E0ILY
            > > England.
            > >
            > > --
            > > Best Regards,
            > > Chris Wilson.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >

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